ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Midwest Dairy works to bring dairy to life

These are challenging times for the U.S. dairy industry. Now, Midwest Dairy -- formerly known as the Midwest Dairy Association -- has made some changes that the organization thinks will help struggling producers.

4156784+1xw39Mb8Z1CXK2MC7eikL8nQFjDoBKJTF.jpg

These are challenging times for the U.S. dairy industry. Now, Midwest Dairy - formerly known as the Midwest Dairy Association - has made some changes that the organization thinks will help struggling producers.

"Our goal is better connecting with consumers," says Lucas Lentsch, Midwest Dairy's CEO.

The changes - made after a year-long planning process with input from Midwest Dairy farmers, staff and partners, including retailers, cooperatives and others - include:

• A new "vision and mission" to work with, and listen more carefully to, consumers to better communicate the nutritiousness of dairy products.

• The new name, which for the first time represents Midwest Dairy as a single entity, and doesn't include "Association" or "Council."

ADVERTISEMENT

• A new logo that conveys "the timeliness of dairy farmers and reminds consumers that dairy is, and always will be, wholesome and enjoyable," Midwest Dairy says.

• Plunging milk prices have stressed dairy farmers nationwide. Midwest Dairy is optimistic that its changes will help producers in both the short- and long-term, Lentsch says.

The organization, which has offices in St. Paul and Buffalo, Minn., Ankeny, Iowa, and Overland Park, Kan., represents 7,000 dairy farm families and promotes dairy sales, fosters innovation and inspires consumer confidence in dairy products and practices. It's funded by checkoff money from dairy farmers in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma.

Some of those states, particularly South Dakota, have worked to expand their respective dairy industries, in part by attracting California dairy operations affected by environmental and regulatory concerns there.

Lentsch said he's confident the Midwest dairy industry will continue to grow, and that the changes at Midwest Dairy will contribute to that growth.

To see a Midwest Dairy video on the changes, go to www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARYx1gwZFgg .

Lucas Lentsch, CEO of Midwest Dairy (Submitted photo)
Lucas Lentsch, CEO of Midwest Dairy (Submitted photo)

What To Read Next
David Karki of SDSU underlined that planting cover crops like rye is not so much about big yield increases, but it will make the land more tolerant of fluctuations in weather.
Navigator CO2 Ventures is hoping to streamline the application process in Illinois as they add an additional pipeline to the mix.
Rod Burkard now has the opportunity to compete in August at the national event in Pennsylvania.
Benson and Turner Foods will process cattle and hogs at Waubun, Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation with the help of a USDA grant.