ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Romania has wheat surplus to export, farm minister says as harvest nears end

Romania's wheat harvest is large enough to cover its domestic needs and ensure a surplus for exports, Agriculture Minister Petre Daea said on Wednesday, Aug. 3, with 96% of the crop reaped so far.

A close of up a head of wheat.
A close-up of a head of wheat.
Erin Ehnle Brown / Grand Vale Creative LLC
We are part of The Trust Project.

BUCHAREST, Aug 3 (Reuters) - Romania's wheat harvest is large enough to cover its domestic needs and ensure a surplus for exports, Agriculture Minister Petre Daea said on Wednesday, Aug. 3, with 96% of the crop reaped so far.

High temperatures and prolonged drought have affected crops, particularly maize and sunflower seeds, across the country and preliminary ministry data on Wednesday showed damage to 205,257 hectares out of roughly 7 million of grain and oil-producing crops.

Romania is among the largest grain sellers to the European Union and an active exporter to the Middle East.

It reaped a record grain crop in 2021, including 11.3 million tonnes of wheat. Its grain crop is generally two to three times the size of its domestic needs.

(Reporting by Luiza Ilie; editing by Jason Neely)

ADVERTISEMENT

______________________________________________________

This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

Read more market stories:
Weather will continue to be the market focus, at least until the end of August, as ideal conditions will be needed for the soybean crop to reach its potential, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management told Don Wick of Red River Farm Network on the Agweek Market Wrap.
The U.S. soybean harvest, already forecast as the biggest ever, will top previous expectations as prospects in major producing states like Illinois, Indiana and Ohio make up for shortfalls west of the Mississippi River, the government said on Friday.
Volatility is alive and well in the commodities. Technically the grains dropped to a very strong support level. If they break the support lines, we could be seeing an interesting August.
The first week of August started out low for the markets but rebounded by Friday, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management and Carah Hart of Red River Farm Network discussed on this week's Agweek Market Wrap. They talked changing weather forecasts, Ukraine grain shipments, U.S. export sales, yield potentials and more.
There was a combination of items that helped give the grains strength to close out the month of July. Early strength was due to weather forecasts calling for extreme heat for the Corn Belt for the first half of August. Concerns about grain movement out of Ukraine added strength.
Weather is a key in the short term, said speakers at the Ag Outlook forum at the 2022 Farmfest near Morgan, Minnesota.

What to read next