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Argentina soy sales lag previous year at 80.6% of harvest

Between Jan. 12-18, producers sold 42,000 metric tons of soy, one of the lowest weekly volumes reported in recent months.

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BUENOS AIRES, Jan 25 (Reuters) - Soybean sales from Argentina's 2021-22 harvest covered 80.6% of the 44 million metric ton harvest as of last week, below the 82.6% sold from the previous season at the same time, data from its agricultural ministry showed Wednesday, Jan. 25.

Between Jan. 12-18, producers sold 42,000 metric tons of soy, one of the lowest weekly volumes reported in recent months.

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Producers have sold 76.3% of Argentina's 2021-22 59 million metric ton corn harvest, the ministry said Tuesday, below the 78.5% sold from the previous season in the same period.

Producers have also sold 51.8% of Argentina's 2022-23 wheat campaign, which the government has projected at just 13.4 million metric tons due to drought.

(Reporting by Belen Liotti; Editing by Alexander Smith)

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Related Topics: MARKETSCROPSSOYBEANSCORN
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