ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Markets

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Tuesday, Nov. 29, he is seeking a deal with Washington after the United States threatened legal action over Mexico's plan to ban genetically modified (GMO) corn in 2024.
Volatility continues in the markets, with headline news leading the way, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management and Randy Koenen of Red River Farm Network discussed on the Agweek Market Wrap. They talk war news, export sales, Mississippi River levels, drought, cattle herd reduction and more on this week's episode.
The back-and-forth in the market this week on news coming out of Ukraine and Russia is a good example on just how jumpy traders are and how sensitive the market is to any sort of disruption in the grains. Stocks of grains around the world are tight and any issue that could result in the disruption of production will result in the grains to rally.
The volume included almost 6 million metric tons of wheat, 8.3 million metric tons of corn and 1.3 million metric tons of barley.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The USDA had some surprising numbers this week in the Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates reports. Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management and Don Wick of Red River Farm Network discuss that, as well as exports, what a railroad strike would mean for markets, the Black Sea grain deal, an uneventful week in livestock and more on this week's Agweek Market Wrap.
Weather, Russia and Ukraine, USDA reports and more are impacting the markets, but the search continues for real direction, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management writes.
Mexico's government cannot make purchases of yellow corn from the United States because it does not want genetically modified (GM) corn, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Wednesday, amid pressure from its top trade partner over the future of the imports.
U.S. corn and soybean inventories will be bigger than previously thought as yields of both crops increased from earlier estimates, the government said on Wednesday, Nov. 9.
The flow of grain is facing setbacks both domestically and on the international scene.
Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management and Don Wick of Red River Farm Network discussed Russia's back-and-forth on the Black Sea grain shipping pact, weather, interest rates, supply and demand and more on the Agweek Market Wrap.

ADVERTISEMENT

Russia's back and forth on the Black Sea grain deal had a big impact on this week's markets, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management says.
The rise in agricultural exports will bolster Canada's economic growth in the third quarter and likely into the fourth, Andrew Grantham, senior economist at CIBC Capital Markets, said in a note.
Grain was flowing out of Ukraine at a record pace on Monday, Oct. 31, under an initiative led by the United Nations aimed at easing global food shortages despite Russia's decision to suspend its participation in the scheme.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT