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Levos Farms offers premium genetics for North Dakota youth

Levos Farms brings high-quality genetics to the region, despite the difficulty.

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Levos Farms runs an intensive embryo transfer program with over 50 donor does and 60 recipient does. Photo taken Aug. 1, 2022, near Chaffee, North Dakota.
Emily Beal / Agweek
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CHAFFEE, N.D. — When driving around the area, chances are you’ll see a slew of cattle before setting your eyes on a herd of goats. Due to the species' rarity in the region compared to other livestock, it can be difficult to get cutting edge goat genetics into the upper Midwest.

But that didn’t stop Brett Levos from setting after high quality genetics and bringing them directly into his herd.

“To be honest with you we’re in North Dakota, we’re a long way from where all the major guys are,” Levos said. “It’s a long drive to get to some of these guys, and so they’re not always willing to lease bucks that far away.”

Brett Levos first found his passion for the goat industry during his years in 4-H. Photo taken August 1, 2022 near Chaffee, North Dakota.
Brett Levos first found his passion for the goat industry during his years in 4-H. Photo taken Aug. 1, 2022, near Chaffee, North Dakota.
Emily Beal / Agweek

Levos’s passion for the goat industry grew during his time in 4-H, where he showed the animal. He was also a 4-H ambassador and his love for 4-H has lasted long after his time in the arena ended.

When his time in 4-H came to a close, Levos wanted to take on a new challenge: raise kids of his very own.

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“I looked at my dad one day and said, 'You know, we’re going out and buying these, do you care if I raise a couple?’ At that time my sister was showing and I was like, ‘We can raise them and, let’s see what we can do, let’s have a little fun with this.’ It’s gone from 15 goats to, we have about 100 goats here now,” Levos said.

Levos Farms runs an intensive embryo transfer program which consists of in vitro fertilization and conventional flushing. They run about 55 boer donor does and about 60 recipient does. Levos Farms also raises sugarbeets, corn, soybeans, wheat, barley and alfalfa.

Levos now helps both local and state 4-H members with their show wethers and does his best to answer questions they may have. He also sells his offspring at a variety of sales around the country as well as having a sale off the farm to make sure local children get the chance to see and potentially purchase their stock.

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Levos Farms encompasses more than just goats. They also raise sugarbeets, corn, soybeans, wheat, barley and alfalfa. Photo taken Aug. 1, 2022, near Chaffee, North Dakota.
Emily Beal / Agweek

Goats offered Levos a unique opportunity to raise a substantial amount of stock on a smaller parcel of land, something that he finds extremely attractive about the species.

“We live here in the Red River Valley, and everybody knows about the farm ground, but there’s not a lot of grass. So we run the goats right here in the yard, make a little hay here and there. But they have such a small footprint, as far as what we need for acreage. We can run a lot of them in just a little spot,” he said.

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