ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

It's begun! Upper Midwest harvest underway

The Upper Midwest harvest has begun. Area farmers have started combining what appears to be good overall crops of oats, barley and wheat, according to the weekly crop report released Monday, July 30, by the National Agricultural Statistics Servic...

Erin Brown/Grand Vale Creative
Erin Brown/Grand Vale Creative

The Upper Midwest harvest has begun.

Area farmers have started combining what appears to be good overall crops of oats, barley and wheat, according to the weekly crop report released Monday, July 30, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The report reflects conditions as of July 29.

The oats' harvest is most advanced.

In South Dakota, 54 percent of oats were harvested on July 29. Seventy-four percent of the crop was rated as good or excellent, with 24 percent fair and 2 percent poor or very poor.

ADVERTISEMENT

In North Dakota, 5 percent of oats were harvested on July 29. Eighty-seven percent of the crop was rated good or excellent, with 10 percent fair and 3 percent poor or very poor.

In Minnesota, 15 percent of oats were harvested on July 29. Seventy-seven percent of the crop was rated good or excellent, 19 percent fair and 4 percent poor or very poor.

The barley harvest is just beginning.

In North Dakota, 1 percent of barley was harvested on July 29. Eighty-seven percent of the crop was in good or excellent condition, 11 percent fair and 2 percent poor or very poor.

In Minnesota, 5 percent of barley was harvested on July 29. Eighty-five percent of the crop was rated good or excellent, 14 percent fair and 1 percent poor.

In Montana, 1 percent of barley was harvested on July 29. Sixty-seven percent of the crop was in good or excellent shape, 27 percent fair and 6 percent poor or very poor.

The spring wheat harvest is just beginning, too, in most of the region, though considerable progress has been made in South Dakota.

Farmers in South Dakota had harvested 35 percent of their spring wheat on July 29. Fifty-two percent was rated good or excellent, 38 percent fair and 10 percent poor or very poor.

ADVERTISEMENT

In North Dakota, 1 percent of spring wheat was harvested on July 29. Eighty-seven percent was in good or excellent condition, 11 percent fair and 2 percent poor or very poor.

In Minnesota, 1 percent of spring of spring wheat was harvested on July 29 Eighty-four percent was rated good or excellent, 15 percent fair and 1 percent very poor.

In Montana, no spring wheat had been harvested on July 29, according to the July 30 report. Sixty-four percent was in good or excellent condition, 26 percent fair and 10 percent poor or very poor.

Corn and soybeans, which along with wheat are the region's three major crops, are still developing and remain weeks away from harvest. Here's a closer look at conditions on July 29:

Corn:

Minnesota - Seventy-nine percent was rated good or excellent, 15 percent fair and 6 percent poor or very poor.

South Dakota - Seventy-five percent was in good or excellent condition, 19 percent fair and 6 percent fair.

North Dakota - Ninety percent was rated good or excellent, 9 percent fair and 1 percent poor.

ADVERTISEMENT

Soybeans

South Dakota - Sixty-nine percent was in good or excellent condition, 24 percent fair and 6 percent poor or very poor.

North Dakota - Eighty-two percent was rated good or excellent, 15 percent fair and 3 percent poor or very poor.

Minnesota - Seventy-five percent was in good or excellent shape, 19 percent fair and 6 percent poor or very poor.

What To Read Next
This week on AgweekTV, we hear about North Dakota corporate farming legislation and about WOTUS challenges. Our livestock tour visits a seedstock operation and a rabbit farm. And we hear about new uses for drones.
Kevin and Lynette Thompson brought TNT Simmental Ranch to life in 1985. Now, their daughter, Shanon Erbele, and her husband, Gabriel, are taking over the reins, and their sale is for Feb. 10.
Gevo will be making sustainable aviation fuel in Lake Preston, South Dakota. Summit Carbon Solutions plans to capture carbon emissions from the facility.
Even if it's not a lucrative venture, the hobby of raising rabbits continues at this farm near Sebeka, Minnesota.