ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

France bans Monsanto GM corn ahead of sowing season

PARIS -- France's agriculture ministry on March 15 banned the sale, use and cultivation of Monsanto's MON 810 genetically modified maize, the only variety currently authorized in the European Union.

PARIS -- France's agriculture ministry on March 15 banned the sale, use and cultivation of Monsanto's MON 810 genetically modified maize, the only variety currently authorized in the European Union.

The French government, which maintains that GM crops present environmental risks, has been trying to institute a new ban on GM corn after its highest court has twice previously struck down similar measures.

The decision is timed to avert any sowing of GM maize by farmers before a draft law is debated on April 10 aimed at banning planting of GMOs (genetically modified organisms).

"The sale, use and cultivation of varieties of maize seed from the line of genetically modified maize MON 810 (...) is banned in the country until the adoption, on the one hand, of a final decision, and secondly, of (EU) community action, " says a decree published on March 14.

Annual sowing of maize in France gets under way in the second half of March.

ADVERTISEMENT

The current Socialist government, like its conservative predecessor, has opposed the growing of GMO crops in light of public suspicion and widespread protests from environmentalists.

Longstanding differences between EU countries resurfaced in February when they failed to agree on whether or not to approve another GM maize variety, Pioneer 1507, developed by DuPont and Dow Chemical, leaving the way open to the EU Commission to clear it for cultivation.

France is trying to win support to overhaul the EU rules.

Related Topics: CROPS
What To Read Next
More people are turning to small, local egg producers as a sharp rise in conventionally farmed egg prices impacts the U.S. this winter.
This week on AgweekTV, we hear from Sen. John Hoeven on the farm bill. Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz puts ag in his budget. We reminisce with Mikkel Pates, and we learn about the origins of the skid-steer.
There's something about Red Angus that caught the eye of this Hitterdal, Minnesota, beef producer.
David Karki of SDSU underlined that planting cover crops like rye is not so much about big yield increases, but it will make the land more tolerant of fluctuations in weather.