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Enrollment open for the SDSU Extension Calf Value Discovery Program

BROOKINGS, S.D. - Oct. 17 is the enrollment deadline for the SDSU Extension Calf Value Discovery Program. "The SDSU Extension Calf Value Discovery Program allows commercial cow/calf operators to obtain valuable feedback to assist in improving the...

Cows along road
Agweek file photo

BROOKINGS, S.D. - Oct. 17 is the enrollment deadline for the SDSU Extension Calf Value Discovery Program.

 "The SDSU Extension Calf Value Discovery Program allows commercial cow/calf operators to obtain valuable feedback to assist in improving their management decision that impact the financial bottom-line," said Julie Walker, Associate Professor & SDSU Extension Beef Specialist. Participants in the SDSU Calf Value Discovery program can consign five or more steer calves 500 to 800 pounds. Cattle will be fed in an accelerated finishing program at the Vander Wal Yards, Bruce. SDSU personnel will weigh cattle periodically and cattle owners will be provided with performance updates. Cattle will be sold in truckload lots beginning approximately May 15, 2017. All cattle will be sold on a grid price system. For specific details on the program, visit the SDSU Calf Value Discovery Program website ( http://www.sdstate.edu/ars/species/beef/calf-value/index.cfm ). The registration deadline is October 17, 2016. Calves can be delivered directly to Vander Wal Yards on November 1or 2 or to the SDSU Cottonwood Research Station on Monday, October 31. For additional information regarding the program please contact Walker at 605.688.5458  or Warren Rusche, SDSU Extension Beef Feedlot Management Associate at  605.688.5452 .

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