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Dicamba survey activated in North Dakota

The North Dakota Department of Agriculture has activated an on-line dicamba injury survey. The survey can be found at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/dicamba-survey and was activated due to reports of possible plant damage resulting from the use of dicam...

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The North Dakota Department of Agriculture has activated an on-line dicamba injury survey.

The survey can be found at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/dicamba-survey  and was activated due to reports of possible plant damage resulting from the use of dicamba herbicide.

Information in the survey will not be used for pesticide enforcement against applicators and no penalties will be issued based on any survey. The intention of this survey is only to quantify the number of potential reports and acres impacted. 

The survey is voluntary and anonymous. The data collected will NOT be used in a complaint investigation. People who wish to submit a formal legal complaint should go here or call the NDDA at 701-328-2231.

Mikkel Pates will have more information on dicamba's impact in 2018 on AgweekTV this weekend and in Agweek Magazine and at www.agweek.com on Monday.

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