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Cass County Weed Control plans spraying, offers assistance

FARGO, N.D. -- Cass County Weed Control is spraying for noxious weeds in the county, state and township road rights-of-way. The public is advised to be watchful of equipment working on the road shoulders and road ditches.

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Cass County Weed Control is spraying for noxious weeds in the county. (Minnesota Department of Ag photo)

FARGO, N.D. - Cass County Weed Control is spraying for noxious weeds in the county, state and township road rights-of-way. The public is advised to be watchful of equipment working on the road shoulders and road ditches.

Landowners wishing to mow their adjoining road ditches are asked to wait several days after the spray crews have sprayed in their area. If spray crews encounter a recently mown road ditch, that area will not be sprayed, but will be targeted for a later application.

Landowners are welcome to call the Weed Control Office to determine if spray activities have been completed in their area or to report weed infestations sites. For more information, call Stan Wolf, weed control officer at 701-298-2388 or email at  wolfs@casscountynd.gov . The department is also accepting applications for its Landowner Assistance Program. The program provides partial cash reimbursements for noxious weed control on pastures, rangelands and other non-crop and non-CRP lands. Up to $1,500 is available to each operator for controlling noxious weeds.

Landowners and operators need to provide a copy of the paid herbicide purchase receipt, an aerial picture or map of the sprayed area along with the application. Applications need to submitted to Cass County Weed Control by Wednesday, Oct. 31. Applications are available at  www.casscountynd.gov  under Weed Control, or by calling 701-298-2388.

Related Topics: CASS COUNTY
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