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Britain's supermarket price war intensifies with Co-op cuts

LONDON - Britain's Co-operative Group has added fuel to the country's supermarket price war with another wave of cuts. The company, which is the UK's fifth-largest supermarket chain by sales, said on Wednesday that the price reductions on more th...

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LONDON - Britain's Co-operative Group has added fuel to the country's supermarket price war with another wave of cuts.

The company, which is the UK's fifth-largest supermarket chain by sales, said on Wednesday that the price reductions on more than 200 of its own-brand British-sourced meat and poultryproducts would total 75 million pounds ($105 million).

The Co-op's move follows salvos already fired this year by Wal-Mart's Asda, Morrisons and discounter Aldi .

A supermarket price war is regularly cited in official data as a factor bearing down on UK inflation.

Asda and Morrisons, the third and fourth-largest groups among the so-called Big Four, have joined market leader Tesco and No.2 player Sainsbury's in cutting prices to try to narrow the gap with Aldi and fellow German discounter Lidl, who have been winning market share.

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Industry data published last month showed that Co-op was the fastest growing non-discounter for the first time since 2011. ($1 = 0.7115 pounds)

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