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Barb Glenn announces her retirement from National Association of State Departments of Agriculture

Glenn was the first woman president for the American Society of Animal Science. She has been selected to serve on the USDA and USTR Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee through multiple presidential administrations, and she’s been an active National Coalition for Food and Agricultural Research board member since 2016.

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Barb Glenn will retire as CEO of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture in 2021. (Provided photo)

Dr. Barb Glenn, CEO of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture , has announced she will retire from her position in the fall of 2021.

“It has been an honor to serve state agriculture departments and amplify their united voice in Washington, D.C. NASDA members are uniquely positioned to lead agriculture toward a healthy and resilient world, and I am extremely proud of the member value NASDA’s team has created during my time,” Glenn said. “Over 40 years, I’ve been fortunate to work among some of the best and brightest in the industry, and nothing is more fulfilling than knowing that we will continue ‘onward and upward’ in our pursuit to serve American farmers, ranchers and communities.”

NASDA is a nonpartisan, nonprofit association which represents the elected and appointed commissioners, secretaries and directors of the departments of agriculture in all 50 states and four U.S. territories.

Glenn received her doctorate in ruminant nutrition from the University of Kentucky. She began her career as a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, discovering solutions for feeding dairy cattle in the laboratory for nearly 20 years. Moving from the lab to advocacy work in governmental relations, she joined the Biotechnology Innovation Organization as managing director of animal biotechnology, food and agriculture in Washington, D.C. Glenn later moved from BIO to CropLife America in 2010 and led its science and regulatory affairs as senior vice president for four years.

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Glenn was selected to serve as NASDA's CEO in 2014.

Glenn was the first woman president for the American Society of Animal Science. She has been selected to serve on the USDA and USTR Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee through multiple presidential administrations, and she’s been an active National Coalition for Food and Agricultural Research board member since 2016.

“After I retire as NASDA CEO, I plan to stay involved with agriculture and continue my volunteer work with the Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation Board, the Howard County Maryland 4-H Foundation Board and chairing the Maryland Farm Bureau Agriculture Education and Extension Committee," Glenn said. "Above all, I look forward to cherishing more time with family and life on Glenn Family Farm.”

“Dr. Glenn holds a wealth of professional expertise and experience in agricultural policy, regulatory challenges and agricultural research. She used her unique perspective to advocate for resources for state departments of agriculture and strengthen our national agriculture and food policy. Dr. Glenn has worked tirelessly for more than four decades, benefiting all who rely on agriculture and leaving a legacy for the industry to follow," said NASDA President Dr. Ryan Quarles.

Glenn will remain in her position as NASDA CEO through early fall 2021 and will assist with the transition.

Related Topics: AGRICULTUREPOLICY
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