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AgweekTV: Weather and prices, World Pork Expo, planting season wraps up, Ukrainian farmer visits North Dakota

This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.

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This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.

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On this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV, StormTRACKER meteorologist Jared Piepenburg said warmer temperatures will be moving into the region later this month, with some places likely to see the first 90-plus degree temperatures in the next two weeks.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV AND HAPPY FATHER'S DAY WEEKEND, I'M EMILY BEAL.

THE JUNE WASDE REPORT WAS GENERALLY NEUTRAL WHEAT, NEGATIVE CORN AND FRIENDLY TO SOYBEANS.

RANDY MARTINSON, OF MARTINSON AG RISK MANAGEMENT, SAYS RIGHT NOW, THE BIG FACTOR IS WEATHER.

ON THE AGWEEK MARKET WRAP, MARTINSON SAID WHEN USDA'S ACREAGE REPORT COMES OUT JUNE 30TH, WE'LL LIKELY SEE CHANGES IN PRODUCTION NUMBERS. SO HE SAYS IN THE MEANTIME, THE MARKET WILL REVOLVE AROUND THE WEATHER. AFTER A COOL, WET SPRING DELAYED PLANTING AROUND THE UPPER MIDWEST, FORECASTS ARE NOW CALLING FOR A HOT, DRY GROWING SEASON.

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Randy Martinson: IT'S GOING TO BECOME A WEATHER MARKET, YOU KNOW, WE ARE GOING TO SEE SOME WARMER, DRIER WEATHER, WHICH WILL LIKELY WRAP UP A LOT OF PLANTING PROGRESS HERE IN THE NEXT WEEK. AND SO YEAH, I THINK RIGHT NOW WEATHER AND GROWING CONDITIONS ARE GOING TO BE THE BIG DRIVER.

YOU CAN SEE OUR FULL MARKET WRAP ON AGWEEK.COM .

THIS HAS BEEN AN UNUSUAL YEAR FOR MANY FARMERS.

THAT'S ESPECIALLY TRUE FOR LARRY LINNEMAN, WHO FARMS IN NORTH EAST NORTH DAKOTA. THE WET SPRING PUT HIS PLANTING ABOUT THREE WEEKS BEHIND ON SOME CROPS. WET GROUND FORCED HIM TO USE TWO TRACTORS TO PULL HIS AIR SEEDER TO PLANT 500 ACRES OF WHEAT. LINNEMAN SAYS DESPITE IT BEING SO LATE, HE NEEDED TO GET THE WHEAT PLANTED TO KEEP HIS ROTATION FOR SUGARBEETS, AND HE HAD ALREADY FERTILIZED THE GROUND LAST FALL, SO HE THOUGHT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO GET IT PLANTED, DESPITE THE CHALLENGES.

Larry Linneman: IT JUST WAS MUSH UNDERNEATH, AND IT WAS, YOU KNOW, AN INCH OF DRY DIRT ON TOP IT JUST COULDN'T PULL IT, SO WE HAD TO PUT TRACTORS ON TO GET HER THROUGH.

LINNEMAN RAISES DRY EDIBLE BEANS, WHEAT, SUGARBEETS AND CORN ON ABOUT 84-HUNDRED ACRES NEAR REYNOLDS. HE SAYS THIS IS THE LATEST HE'S DONE THE MAJORITY OF HIS PLANTING, BUT HE WANTED TO AVOID PREVENTED PLANT. AND HE SAYS DESPITE THE LATE FINISH, HE'S STILL OPTIMISTIC THERE'S STILL ENOUGH GROWING SEASON LEFT.

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SEVERAL ISSUES TOOK CENTER STAGE AT THE WORLD PORK EXPO, HELD RECENTLY IN DES MOINES, IOWA. AMONG PRODUCERS CONCERNS ARE MORE ACCESS TO FOREIGN WORKERS, THE THREAT OF AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, AND A NEW CALIFORNIA LAW THAT COULD AFFECT ALL AMERICAN PRODUCERS.

Terry Wolters: WE HAVE THE ABILITY TO RAISE THE MOST EFFICIENT, AFFORDABLE PRODUCT ON THE GLOBE.

BUT TERRY WOLTERS, THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS, SAYS ONE THING THAT'S HOLDING THEM BACK IS A SHORTAGE OF WORKERS. HE SAYS THEY NEED REFORM IN THE H2A VISA PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN WORKERS.

Terry Wolters: THE JOBS IN OUR FARMS ARE VERY TECHNICAL, AND WITH THAT TECHNICAL TRAINING THAT IT TAKES TO GET THAT EMPLOYEE UP AND RUNNING AND BEING REALLY EFFICIENT IN THEIR JOB, THEN IT'S TIME TO GO HOME. AND SO WE NEED TO EXPAND THE NUMBERS THAT WE HAVE AVAILABLE TO US IN THE PROGRAM, BUT WE ALSO NEED TO EXTEND THE TIMELINE THAT WE'RE ALLOWED TO HAVE THOSE PEOPLE HERE.

ALTHOUGH PORK PRICES ARE GOOD, INPUT PRICES ARE HIGH AS WELL, ESPECIALLY FEED. IN ADDITION, PORK PRODUCERS FEAR AN AFRICAN SWINE FEVER OUTBREAK. INCOMING PORK PRODUCERS COUNCIL PRESIDENT SCOTT HAYS SAYS SINCE 30 PERCENT OF U.S. PORK OUTPUT GOES OVERSEAS, THEY ARE CONCERNED ABOUT ANY TRADE DISRUPTION.

Scott Hays: THERE'S ALWAYS SOME ISSUES THERE THAT WE'RE WORKING ON AND KEEPING THOSE DOORS OPEN. TRADE'S VERY IMPORTANT TO ALL PRODUCERS, IMPORTANT TO THE INDUSTRY, AND SO WE'RE EXCITED THAT THE PRODUCT IS STILL MOVING OUT OF THE COUNTRY.

ANOTHER LOOMING ISSUE AT THE EXPO IS CALIFORNIA'S PROPOSITION TWELVE, WHICH CALLS FOR STRICT RULES IN HOW PIGS ARE RAISED. IT WAS TO TAKE EFFECT IN JANUARY, BUT IS BEING APPEALED TO THE SUPREME COURT.

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AS THE SUMMER ROLLS AROUND, RANCHERS SHOULD MAKE SURE THEIR HERDS ARE PROTECTED AGAINST ANTHRAX.

THE BACTERIAL DISEASE IMPACTS MOSTLY CATTLE. ANTHRAX IS EXTREMELY RESISTANT, AND ONCE PRESENT, CAN BE EXPECTED TO BE IN SPORE FORM FOR MANY YEARS.

Russ Daly: When cattle are exposed to those spores and they ingest them or eat them basically then those bacteria can grow within the animal and cause the production of toxins, those toxins really create some fatal situations.

DALY ADVISES RANCHERS TO IMPLEMENT THE ANTHRAX VACCINE INTO THEIR MANAGEMENT PLAN, ESPECIALLY IN AREAS OF DROUGHT.

In dry drought conditions, we have animals that are grazing closer to the ground getting their forage and inhaling or ingesting more dirt basically and more of those spores.

ANTHRAX CAN BE DEADLY TO BOTH LIVESTOCK AND PEOPLE.

FARMERS IN WAR-TORN UKRAINE ARE IN DESPERATE NEED OF HELP. MANY ARE UNABLE TO HARVEST THEIR WINTER WHEAT CROPS, BECAUSE RUSSIAN TROOPS HAVE PUT MINES IN THEIR FIELDS. ONE UKRAINIAN FARMER HAS TRAVELED TO NORTH DAKOTA, TO ASK FOR HELP.

ROMAN GRYNSHYN IS ASKING FARMERS TO PLEDGE "A PENNY A BUSHEL" TO HELP UKRAINE'S FARMERS.

The tongue in cheek story in Ukraine right now is farmers have become one of the world's biggest military forces.... all because they keep finding and recovering tanks and missiles in their grain fields. But no one is laughing at the tragedy of farm life in Ukraine. Roads and farm fields have been mined. Farmers are pulling out Russian weapons from grain fields.

Roman Grynyshyn: That makes it difficult and dangerous. So to say Russian roulette whether to harvest or not. Because winter crops are about ready to be harvested but the farmers are considering whether to harvest it or not.

That's Roman Grynyshyn of Ukraine. Over the years, he has led countless Ukrainian ag trade missions here to NDSU and eastern North Dakota. Now he comes back, representing a new effort to rebuild Ukraine's farming community.. family by family.

Jon Bertch: To think that instead of rain falling down, that bombs are falling down from the sky and you literally have tanks in your field protecting you.

It's stories like this that has North Dakota ag leaders like Jon Bertch of Bertch farms near Hillsboro, who are stepping up to assist Roman and Ukrainian farmers.

Grain fields, ready for harvest, are even targets. Roman says that farmers who are trying to combine are sometimes facing a field burned.

Our soldiers, they are literally running through the fields with these blankets and trying to take down the fires.

GRYNSHYN'S GROUP, CALLED "WORLD TO REBUILD RURAL UKRAINE" IS ALSO ACCEPTING CASH DONATIONS.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL SEE WHAT ONE UNIVERSITY IS DOING TO HELP EASE THE SHORTAGE OF VETERINARIANS.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

LATE PLANTING MEANS EXTRA CHALLENGES FOR WEED CONTROL THIS SEASON. IN THIS MONTH'S SOY INSIGHT, WE HAVE SOME ADVICE ABOUT SPRAYING.

ROSE: WE'RE HERE IN A NDSU EXTENSION SOYBEAN RESEARCH TEST PLOT WITH EXTENSION WEED SPECIALIST JOE IKLEY. NOW YOU'VE TOLD ME SOME OF THESE ARE UNTREATED, AND SOME ARE TREATED WITH A PRE-EMERGE, WHICH IS REALLY IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR GROWERS THIS YEAR GIVEN OUR CRAZY SPRING WEATHER, ISN'T IT?

Joe Ikley: THIS TRIAL BEHIND ME IS ONE OF THE PERFECT BACKDROPS FOR SOME OF THE QUESTIONS I'M GETTING AT THE MOMENT. SEVERAL OF THESE CHECKERBOARD PATTERN LOOKING AREAS HAVE A LOT OF GREEN, AND THOSE DID NOT GET A PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE. BASICALLY ALL THE GREEN, EXCEPT FOUR THREE OR FOUR ROWS THAT YOU'RE SEEING ARE WEEDS COMING IN BETWEEN THE SOYBEAN ROWS.

SO WE'RE GETTING UP AGAINST SOME DEADLINES NOW.

Joe Ikley:

FOR THOSE WHO HAVE EXTEND OR EXTEND FLEX SOYBEAN SYSTEMS AND WISH TO APPLY DICAMBA ON THOSE FIELDS, WE KNOW WE HAVE A JUNE 30TH CUTOFF DATE. FOR OTHERS, WHEN WE LOOK AT THINGS LIKE THE ENLIST SOYBEAN TECHNOLOGY, ANY OF THE LIBERTY LINK SOYBEAN TECHNOLOGY, WE HAVE GROWTH STAGE CUTOFFS.

SO IF A FARMER DIDN'T GET TO PRE-EMERGENCE, WHAT TO DO NOW?

Joe Ikley: THIS YEAR WITH SATURATED SOILS, THE WEEDS ARE ALL COMING, THEY'RE ALL COMING AT ONCE. AND NOW THAT WE'RE INTO THE HEAT OF SUMMER, THEY'RE GOING TO BE GROWING VERY RAPIDLY. SO THIS MEANS THAT IF YOU DID NOT GET A PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE ONTO THAT FIELD TO HOLD THOSE WEEDS BACK, YOU MAY HAVE TO SPRAY FIELDS SOONER THAN YOU EVEN ANTICIPATE. AND SO WE'VE GOT SOME PLOTS OUT HERE I THINK THAT SHOW THAT, THAT WE HAVE SOME SOYBEANS AT THE UNIFOLIATE STAGE, ABOUT TWO AND A HALF WEEKS OLD, AND WE HAVE WEEDS TALLER THAN THOSE SOYBEANS ALREADY.

SO THEN WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS OF LATE SPRAYING ON NEXT YEAR'S PLANTING?

Joe Ikley: THERE'S REALLY ONLY ONE PRODUCT THAT COMES TO MY MIND IN SOYBEAN, THAT IF WE APPLY IT LATE MIGHT INFLUENCE NEXT YEAR, AND THAT WOULD BE FOMESAFINE. SO MAIN BRAND NAMES ARE REFLEX OR FLEX STAR THAT WE USE IN SOYBEAN, PLENTY OF GENERICS ON THE MARKET. AND THE MAIN THING THAT COMES TO MY MIND IS AS A TEN MONTH CROP ROTATION TO CORN. SO LET'S SAY WE APPLY THAT ON JULY FIFTEENTH, THAT MEANS YOU WON'T BE ABLE TO PLANT CORN UNTIL MAY FIFTEENTH AT THE EARLIEST NEXT YEAR.

ROSE: THANKS JOE. NDSU EXTENSION WEED SPECIALIST JOE IKLEY.

THERE'S A SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF VETERINARIANS, BUT THE PRE-VET PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-CROOKSTON IS HELPING EASE THAT.

IN OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY, WE MEET A GRADUATE OF THE PROGRAM WHO'S NOW PRACTICING IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

Dr. Samantha Zuck-Roscoe: I HAVE WANTED TO BE A VET SINCE I WAS ABOUT FOUR, AND IT'S NEVER CHANGED.

DOCTOR SAMANTHA ZUCK-ROSCOE FULFILLED THAT CHILDHOOD DREAM WITH HELP, IN PART, FROM A PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-CROOKSTON.

Dr. Samantha Zuck-Roscoe: IT'S THE SMALL CLASS SIZES AND THE HANDS ON EXPERIENCE WAS WHAT SOLD ME. AND IT WAS A FAMILY.

ZUCK-ROSCOE GRADUATED FROM THE PRE-VETERINARY PROGRAM AT UM-C, WITH A MAJOR IN ANIMAL SCIENCE PRE-VET, AND A MINOR IN EQUINE SCIENCE. CROOKSTON'S PROGRAM IS PART OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA'S VETERINARY FOOD ANIMAL SCHOLARS, OR 'VET FAST' PROGRAM. STUDENTS CAN APPLY WHILE ATTENDING UM-C.

Dr. Samantha Zuck-Roscoe: MOST EVERY CLASS HAD HANDS-ON LABS. IT JUST EXPOSED YOU TO ALL SORTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS.

STUDENTS IN THE 'VET FAST' PROGRAM HAVE PRIORITY FOR GETTING INTO THE U OF M'S VET SCHOOL, AND A MUCH HIGHER RATE OF ACCEPTANCE TO OTHER VET SCHOOLS. THEY'RE ALSO ABLE TO CUT THE EIGHT-YEAR VET EDUCATION PROGRAM DOWN TO SEVEN. ZUCK-ROSCOE GRADUATED FROM WASHINGTON STATE IN 2017, AND A COUPLE OF YEARS LATER, RETURNED TO WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA TO PRACTICE.

Dr. Samantha Zuck-Roscoe: I SEE MOSTLY SMALL ANIMALS, BUT I DO THE OCCASIONAL LARGE ANIMAL AS WELL. WE SEE MOSTLY CATTLE AND HORSES HERE. LARGE ANIMAL IS UNPREDICTABLE. GOTTA DO EVERYTHING SAFELY.

WE MIGHT BE A NORMAL DAY OF APPOINTMENTS WITH NO EMERGENCIES OR URGENT CARES, VERSUS THE NEXT DAY WHERE WE HAVE TWENTY URGENT CARES AND A FULL SCHEDULE OF APPOINTMENTS. AND THEN HAVE TO WORK IN A CALVING IN THE MIDDLE OF IT. SOMETHING DIFFERENT EVERY DAY.

YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, AND AT AGWEEK.COM .

THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA IS ALSO TEAMING UP WITH A HIGH SCHOOL TO ADVANCE RESEARCH INTO KERNZA.

ALEXANDRIA HIGH SCHOOL AG STUDENTS ARE WORKING WITH THE U OF M TO GROW TEST PLOTS. KERNZA IS A PERENNIAL GRAIN THAT'S BEEN GETTING BUZZ IN RECENT YEARS FOR ITS MULTIPLE USES AS A FORAGE, A HEALTHY FOOD FOR PEOPLE, AND A PLANT THAT'S GOOD FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

Jeff Pokorney: THIS IS REALLY TALKED ABOUT AS A PERENNIAL GRASS THAT CAN HELP CLEAN UP OUR WATERWAYS, ELIMINATE PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN LEACHING INTO OUR WATER SYSTEMS. AND THIS IS ONE REASON WHY WE WANT TO BE PROACTIVE, AS WELL AS HELPING WITH OUR BUFFER STRIPS AND OUR WATERWAYS IN MINNESOTA.

THE U OF M IS WORKING WITH THE LAND INSTITUTE IN KANSAS, WHICH IS WORKING ON INCREASING KERNZA YIELDS, AND WAYS TO USE IT IN FOOD PRODUCTION. LARS DROPIK IS ONE OF THE STUDENTS DOING THE RESEARCH. HE SAYS IT WOULD BE GREAT FOR THEIR LIVESTOCK, AS YOU CAN GRAZE IT AND IT WILL GROW BACK BY HARVEST TIME.

Lars Dropik: I THINK IT WOULD BE GOOD FOR OUR FARM BECAUSE THEN WE COULD GRAZE IT RIGHT AWAY IN THE SPRING WHEN THE PASTURES MIGHT NOT BE READY, AND THEN WE COULD HARVEST IT LATER THAT YEAR AND USE IT FOR FEED.

THE HIGH SCHOOL PLANTED TWO ACRES OF KERNZA, AND WILL PLANT TWO MORE ACRES IN AUGUST.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A DELEGATION FROM ASIA VISITS FARGO TO LEARN ABOUT THE REGION'S SOYBEANS.

WHEN CAN THE REGION EXPECT A BREAK FROM THE HEAT?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

THE NORTHERN CROPS INSTITUTE ON THE NDSU CAMPUS HOSTS MANY GROUPS, BUT HAD TO PAUSE THAT DURING COVID. NCI RECENTLY HOSTED ITS FIRST INTERNATIONAL DELEGATION SINCE THE PANDEMIC BEGAN.

THE ATTENDEES CAME FROM AN ARRAY OF ASIAN COUNTRIES TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE REGION'S SOYBEAN INDUSTRY.

Brian Sorenson: We are extremely excited to be back giving the in-person programs. There's nothing like being able to be face to face in person with these customers

BRIAN SORENSON IS THE PROGRAM MANAGER FOR THE NORTHERN CROPS INSTITUTE. THIS WEEK THEY'RE HOSTING SOYBEAN BUYERS FROM SIX ASIAN COUNTRIES. THEY'LL LEARN ABOUT THE REGION'S SOYBEAN INDUSTRY AT THE FIVE DAY FOOD GRADE SOYBEAN PROCUREMENT COURSE.

So these ones, we're going to have these ones on this.

Alan Poock: The midwest produces a high volume of soybeans, it's very productive. And there's a surplus in this area when you think about it. We grow more than we consume with the animal feed markets or human food markets so we need to find customers for them internationally to help buy those extra soybeans. Whether it's for human foods, animal feed or used aquaculture.

ALAN POOCK IS THE ASIAN DIVISION DIRECTOR FOR WORLD INITIATIVE FOR SOY IN HUMAN HEALTH , OR "WISHH". POOCK BELIEVES THAT THE MIDWEST'S SOYBEAN INDUSTRY IS A VALUABLE RESOURCE FOR ASIAN COUNTRIES AND THE GROUP IS THANKFUL TO BE BACK IN THE REGION.

Phyu: We are really excited to learn about the food grade soybean and production>

PHYU ALSO WORKS WITH WISHH AND THE AMERICAN SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION.

ATTENTION, EVERYONE. AGWEEK WANTS TO SEE YOUR PATRIOTIC COLORS!

FOR THE FIFTH YEAR IN A ROW, MIKKEL PATES WILL BE HIGHLIGHTING FLAGS ON FARMS IN THE REGION FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY. AND THIS YEAR, WE WANT YOU TO BE PART OF THE STORY. SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND ANECDOTES ABOUT FLAGS ON YOUR FARM TO JSCHLECHT@AGWEEK.COM BY JUNE 24TH.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A BIG CELEBRATION IS COMING UP AT NORTH DAKOTA'S OLDEST FAMILY FARM.

NORTH DAKOTA'S OLDEST FAMILY-RUN FARM WILL CELEBRATE 150 YEARS NEXT WEEKEND.

340 DESCENDANTS OF ERICK AND KARI EVENSON WILL GATHER AT THE FARM NEAR MAYVILLE WHERE THEY MADE THEIR HOME WHEN THEY CAME TO THE U.S. FROM SCANDINAVIA IN 1872. WHEN THE EVENSONS ARRIVED, THEY LIVED IN A LOG HOME THEY DUG INTO A HILL. THEIR GREAT-GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER STILL LIVES IN THE FAMILY HOME THEY BUILT LATER.

Annette Struck: I grew up just down the road from here, and this is my home away from home. Grandma and grandpa lived here. I never in a million years as a child would have dreamt that this would be a place I would raise my own family someday. I am so grateful.

THE ORIGINAL PLOW USED ON THE FARM IS ON DISPLAY. THE FARM IS ALSO HOME TO THE STATE'S LARGEST OAK TREE, ESTIMATED TO BE 450 YEARS OLD.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A MINNESOTA DAIRY HAS BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR ITS SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES.

AND A NATIVE OF THE LARGEST PORK PRODUCING STATE IS LEADING THE NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS COUNCIL IN A NEW, ENERGIZED DIRECTION.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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