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AgweekTV: Iowa Crop Update

In the August crop report USDA pegged corn yields in Iowa at 202 bushels per acre, that's unchanged from last year, but they raised soybean yields to a record 59 bushels per acre, versus 56.5 last year. So is the record crop really there? We talk...

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In the August crop report USDA pegged corn yields in Iowa at 202 bushels per acre, that's unchanged from last year, but they raised soybean yields to a record 59 bushels per acre, versus 56.5 last year.  So is the record crop really there? We talked to farmers in northwest Iowa to find out.

 

Michelle: Despite some weather challenges, farmers are optimistic about yield potential in northwest Iowa.

  

Shane Susie: I think we're looking at probably in the top two or three corn crops that we've seen in the last few years and I think beans are going to surprise us in a positive way as well.

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Michelle: The question mark with corn is did the crop get pushed too fast with growing degree units well ahead of normal?

 

Nate Mayer: The last I checked we were around 300 ahead, so pretty far considering what we started out with.

 

Michelle: Roger Wilcox isn't concerned as a yield check on his farm shows no tip-back and good kernel depth.

 

Roger Wilcox: We got to pollination quickly but after pollination we really had ideal weather for fill.  

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Michelle: However, there are some pockets that have turned dry, shaving production.  

 

Bruce Willems: We're farming some bottom ground that looks really well this year it's going to be in that 250 range we're guessing.  We've got some hill ground that is missing some of those rains it's probably going to be 170-180.

 

Michelle: Soybeans yields are tougher to estimate with variability in fields tied to areas that were too wet to start the season.   

 

Nate Mayer: It's gonna vary from zeros where we've had hail and drowned out spots to we're going to see 80-bushel beans on the monitor for a while.

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Michelle: Yet, Susie says pod counts are above last year, so he's optimistic about higher yields.   

 

Susie: I think if you're typically in the 65 to 70 bushel range on your farm you could probably be looking at 75 bushel beans.

 

Michelle: So, the key now will be good August rains to finish up the crop.

 

Related Topics: AGWEEKTVSOYBEANSCORN
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