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AgweekTV Full Show: The 40th annual Agweek Farm Show

This week on AgweekTV, we head to Rochester, Minnesota, for the 40th annual Agweek Farm Show. Agriculture looks for supply solutions with Black Sea exports shut down. A cutting-edge vet clinic is attracting new clients and new vets to the business. A Minnesota farm is rebuilding, with the help of some friends and neighbors, after a devastating fire. And with record high fertilizer prices, farm groups push for an investigation.

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This week on AgweekTV, we head to Rochester, Minnesota, for the 40th annual Agweek Farm Show. Agriculture looks for supply solutions with Black Sea exports shut down. A cutting-edge vet clinic is attracting new clients and new vets to the business. A Minnesota farm is rebuilding, with the help of some friends and neighbors, after a devastating fire. And with record high fertilizer prices, farm groups push for an investigation.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THIS WEEK WE'RE AT THE 40TH ANNUAL AGWEEK FARM SHOW HERE IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA.

THE SHOW FEATURES MORE THAN 50 LOCAL, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL VENDORS. IT'S A CAN'T MISS OPPORTUNITY FOR FARMERS AND AG LEADERS TO NETWORK AND CONNECT DIRECTLY WITH A VARIETY OF AG SUPPLIERS AND SERVICE PROVIDERS.

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A NEW ADDITION THIS YEAR WAS AGWEEK REPORTERS MODERATING EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS. JEFF BEACH DISCUSSED CARBON PIPELINES, NOAH FISH LED A PANEL ON FIGHTING FOOD INSECURITY WITH LOCAL FOODS, AND I TALKED ABOUT THE FUTURE OF LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION .

THE SHOW WAS HELD VIRTUALLY IN 2021.

WITH BLACK SEA GRAIN EXPORTS SHUT DOWN AND UNCERTAINTY ABOUT THE 2022 CROP, THE INDUSTRY IS FRANTICALLY EXPLORING SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS.

ONE IDEA IS TO RELEASE CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM ACRES FOR ONE YEAR. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AG ECONOMIST DR. SCOTT IRWIN SAYS HE ISN'T SURE IF USDA HAS THE POLITICAL WILL, BUT A HISTORICAL WAR IN A MAJOR AG PRODUCING COUNTRY MAY TAKE RADICAL ACTION TO REMEDY. HE THINKS THE MOVE COULD GENERATE SEVERAL MILLION ACRES OF THE 22 MILLION CURRENTLY IN CRP.

Dr. Scott Irwin: I was hopeful that maybe out of the 22 million acres in the CRP, that there might be 5 to 8 million that could be successfully converted in the short run.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY'S CHAD HART SAYS IT'S MORE LIKELY USDA WILL FALL BACK ON OTHER EMERGENCY MEASURES THEY'VE PREVIOUSLY USED WITH CRP.

Chad Hart: With the drought out here, we can already see emergency haying and grazing needed for that, and that would open up some land, not in CRP but is in hay production right now, that could move into row crop.

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THEY AGREE GETTING THOSE ACRES PLANTED IS DIFFICULT WITH THE SHORTAGE AND HIGH PRICE OF INPUTS LIKE FERTILIZER AND YIELD WOULD LIKELY BE BELOW AVERAGE. BUT IT WOULD STILL PROVIDE SOME RELIEF.

FERTILIZER PRICES WERE AT RECORD HIGHS BEFORE THE WAR, PROMPTING AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK AND SEVERAL STATE ATTORNEY'S GENERAL TO ASK FOR A JUSTICE DEPARTMENT INVESTIGATION INTO PRICE FIXING.

FARMERS ARE CONCERNED THE RECORD HIGH FERTILIZER PRICES ARE A RESULT OF POSSIBLE GOUGING WITH ONLY A HANDFUL OF COMPANIES PRODUCING AND CONTROLLING SUPPLIES IN THE U.S. NCGA LEADERSHIP TALKED TO THE COMPANIES TRYING TO AVOID THIS ACTION.

Tom Haag: We don't like to see the politicians have to get involved in it. Let's just work on the same page and see if we can't both work this out, you know, before we have to have legislation because then you have one side of the aisle that maybe doesn't like it one side of the aisle does so then it prolongs things down the road.

HAAG SAYS THEY MET WITH NITROGEN SUPPLIER C-F INDUSTRIES, PLUS PHOSPHATE PRODUCER MOSAIC, WHO THEY ASKED TO DROP THEIR ACTION ON IMPORT TARIFFS ON PHOSPHATE.

We filed an amicus brief with them, they did not like that. We asked them to take the tariffs away and they say no we're not going to do that. And we say well that directly hurts the farmer coming back.

HE SAYS MOSAIC CONTROLS 75-PERCENT OF THE MARKET WHICH IS A MONOPOLY AND IT MAY WARRANT ANTI-TRUST ACTION.

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THE MARCH WASDE REPORT WAS RELEASED ON WEDNESDAY.

USDA SURPRISINGLY LOWERED BLACK SEA CORN EXPORTS, SUBSEQUENTLY INCREASING U.S. EXPORTS BY 75 MILLION BUSHELS AND LOWERING CARRYOUT 100 MILLION. THE SOUTH AMERICAN CROP WAS LOWERED SLIGHTLY.

USDA ALSO CUT BLACK SEA WHEAT EXPORTS BUT GLOBAL ENDING STOCKS WERE STILL RAISED BY 3.3 MILLION METRIC TONS.

AND USDA CUT THE SOUTH AMERICAN SOYBEAN CROP BY 8.5 MILLION METRIC TONS AND AS A RESULT RAISED U.S. EXPORTS, WHICH DROPPED U.S. ENDING STOCKS 40 MILLION BUSHELS.

HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA CONTINUES TO SPREAD THROUGH POULTRY OPERATIONS IN OUR REGION.

SOUTH DAKOTA REPORTED ITS FIRST CASE IN A COMMERCIAL MIXED SPECIES FLOCK IN CHARLES MIX COUNTY IN THE SOUTHEASTERN CORNER OF THE STATE.

ON MONDAY, THE IOWA DEPARTMENT OF AG ALSO CONFIRMED A SECOND INFECTION, BUT THIS WAS THE FIRST CASE IN A COMMERCIAL FLOCK OF 50,000 TURKEYS. IT WAS LOCATED IN BUENA VISTA COUNTY, WHICH IS IN THE NORTHWEST.

IN BOTH CASES THE FLOCKS WERE DEPOPULATED AND A 10 KILOMETER CONTROL ZONE WAS ESTABLISHED AROUND THE AREA WITH NEARBY FLOCKS QUARANTINED FOR TESTING.

NEBRASKA ALSO REPORTED ITS FIRST CASE OF BIRD FLU, BUT IN A WILD GOOSE IN LINCOLN.

WITH THE GROWING INTEREST IN CARBON CAPTURE PIPELINES, AGWEEK'S JEFF BEACH LED A PANEL DISCUSSION TO LOOK AT THE SOME OF THE CONCERNS HERE AT THE AGWEEK FARM SHOW.

DAN WAHL WAS ONE OF THREE PEOPLE ON THE PIPELINE PANEL.

HE'S A FARMER IN NORTHWEST IOWA, WHERE SUMMIT CARBON SOLUTIONS WANTS TO RUN A PIPELINE. BUT HE'S AGAINST IT COMING THROUGH HIS PROPERTY. AND HE ENCOURAGES LANDOWNERS TO DO THEIR HOMEWORK ON THE MANY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH CARBON PIPELINES.

Dan Wahl: AT THIS MOMENT IN TIME, WE'RE SORELY HIT IN THE FACE WITH HOW LITTLE PROPERTY RIGHTS OF EMINENT DOMAIN THAT WE DO HAVE IN OUR STATE OF IOWA. EMINENT DOMAIN THING IS THE HUGE THING IN OUR LAND BECAUSE SO MANY OF US ARE PATTERN TILED. MY PERSONAL REASON WAS, YOU CAN'T COME ON MY LAND UNLESS I GIVE YOU PERMISSION.

PIPELINE COMPANIES WILL NEED TO SECURE PERMITS BEFORE CONSTRUCTION CAN BEGIN. MICHELLE.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV,

A NEW, CUTTING EDGE VET CLINIC OPENS IN NORTH DAKOTA, WITH HOPES OF ATTRACTING MORE VETS TO THE REGION.

A VETERINARY CLINIC IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA IS EXPANDING.

ROSE DUNN JOINS US WITH MORE, IN OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY.

DR. NATHAN KJELLAND SAYS THE GOLDEN VALLEY VETERINARY CLINIC IS DEDICATED TO GIVING QUALITY CARE TO ALMOST ANY ANIMAL, AND IT ATTRACTS CLIENTS FROM ALL OVER THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE STATE, AND NORTHWEST MINNESOTA.

Dr. Nathan Kjelland: IT'S ONE OF MY FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT BEING A VETERINARIAN, IS NOT KNOWING EXACTLY WHAT I'M GOING TO GET TO DO EVERY DAY.

DR. NATHAN KJELLAND HAS BEEN PRACTICING SINCE 2009.

There are aspects of every clinic that I've worked at in this one.

HE AND HIS WIFE BRITT JACOBSON HAVE BUILT THEIR NEW ANIMAL HOSPITAL AROUND A COMMITMENT TO GIVING ANIMALS QUALITY CARE.

I think there are a lot of places that are disqualified by people looking for jobs, because they're not keeping up with the times.

THE NEW LOCATION IS 11,000 SQUARE FEET OF STATE OF THE ART EQUIPMENT.

We control the head with this, and then we've got a sweep.

SET UP FOR LARGE AND SMALL ANIMALS.

Dr. Nathan Kjelland: I REALLY LOVE THE FACT THAT I GET TO WORK ON A CAT, AND THEN I GET TO WORK ON A DOG, AND THEN I GET TO WORK ON A HORSE AND THEN I GET TO WORK ON A COW, AND THERE MIGHT BE SOMETHING WEIRD THROWN IN THERE. and EVERY DAY IS JUST A LITTLE DIFFERENT.

THE NEW LOCATION IS ABOUT FIVE TIMES BIGGER THAN THEIR OLD ONE, ALLOWING THEM TO OFFER ALMOST EVERY CARE AN ANIMAL NEEDS. THEY ALSO HAVE A SQUEEZE SHOOT FOR LARGE ANIMALS, ALLOWING FOR MORE COMFORT FOR THE ANIMAL, AND SAFETY FOR THE EMPLOYEES.

I want to make sure that the people who work for me are safe.

THE BUILDING HAS SEVERAL OTHER FEATURES FOR THEIR SAFETY AND COMFORT AS WELL.

Dr. Nathan Kjelland: YOU'RE ENCOUNTERING A LOT OF THEM IN TIMES WHEN THEY'RE STRESSED OR THEY'RE INJURED OR THEY'RE WORRIED ABOUT SOMETHING, AND BEING ABLE TO DO THAT SAFELY IS CRITICAL.

THEY ALSO HAVE AN OBSTETRICS CHUTE AND PLENTY OF SPACE FOR INDOOR BIRTHS.

Dr. Nathan Kjelland: IT BENEFITS THE PRODUCER, IT BENEFITS THE ANIMAL AND IT BENEFITS THE VETERINARIANS.

THEY'RE HOPING ALL THESE FEATURES WILL ATTRACT MORE VETERINARIANS, TECHNICIANS AND OTHER SUPPORT STAFF TO PARK RIVER.

Britt Jacobson: THRIVING BUSINESSES IN SMALL RURAL COMMUNITIES IS CRITICAL FOR OUR SMALL RURAL COMMUNITIES. AND WE'RE VERY COMMITTED TO BEING HERE, AND YOU KNOW, WE'RE PROVIDING JOBS AS WELL AS CARE, AND I THINK THOSE ARE IMPORTANT PARTS FOR A RURAL COMMUNITY.

DR. KJELLAND SAYS THEY ARE WORKING TO RECRUIT MORE VETERINARIANS TO THE CLINIC.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

A NORTH DAKOTA FARMER ACCUSED OF FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE FRAUD IS SET FOR TRIAL NEXT MONTH.

KENT PFAFF HAS A LARGE FARM NEAR WASHBURN, IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

IN FEDERAL COURT IN BISMARCK, PFAFF PLEADED NOT GUILTY TO THE CHARGES THAT HE SHIFTED PRODUCTION AND GAVE FALSE INFORMATION TO USDA'S RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY. THE GOVERNMENT CLAIMS THE FRAUD HAPPENED FROM 2017 TO 2020.

IF CONVICTED, PFAFF FACES UP TO 30 YEARS IN PRISON AND UP TO A $1 MILLION FINE.

HERE AT THE AGWEEK FARM SHOW, WE HELD A PANEL DISCUSSION ON THE CURRENT AND FUTURE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION.

Panelists noted that Minnesota consumers are generally supportive of livestock production and pork producer Dave Mensink says that's growing as they adopt more sustainable practices.

Mensink: We're tracking the amount of LP we're using on a per pig basis, the gallons of water, what are we doing with our nutrient management plan, as far as, so we're not over applying nitrogen.

And he sees an opportunity to turn those climate smart ag practices into a win win for farmers and consumers.

Mensink: We want to protect their water, our kids and grandkids drink from that same water source.

Paul Brietzke with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says he gets very few complaints about livestock operations which reflects on the responsible job they're doing.

Paul: If farmers are operating in compliance and they take the neighborhood into consideration those two things really can go a long way.

And he thinks communication and transparency also help the public better understand how regulated operations really are.

Paul: The majority of the feedlot rules are designed to protect surface and ground water.

Shelly DePestel says there's room for growth in the livestock industry in Minnesota even though expansion on her own dairy is tied up in court.

DePestel: Worked through the state, got our permits but now it's more of a local thing and activist group, so we're working on that.

She says its frustrating since dairies have continued to lower their carbon footprint.

Plus she says the livestock industry is good for the economy.

DePestel: It's really important for the guys in the other room you know selling dairy equipment and machinery and those types of things that you know all the dairies in our area are successful.

FRIENDS AND FAMILY TURN OUT TO HELP A MINNESOTA DAIRY FARMER REBUILD AFTER A FIRE. THE STORY'S AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV.

THE DROUGHT MONITOR SHOWS LINGERING DROUGHT IN THE WESTERN PART OF OUR REGION. SO WHAT IS THE OUTLOOK FOR THE PLANTING SEASON?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

ABOUT SIX WEEKS AFTER FIRE DESTROYED HIS DAIRY BARN, A CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARMER'S NEW BARN IS NEARLY READY FOR COWS.

AS JEFF BEACH REPORTS, PAUL ZIMMERMAN'S FRIENDS AND FAMILY SWUNG INTO ACTION TO HELP HIM REBUILD.

Paul Zimmerman: I SAW THE GLOW OUT THE BACK OF THE HOUSE, AND I KNEW RIGHT AWAY IT MUST BE THE BARN.

ON A JANUARY NIGHT ABOUT SIX WEEKS AGO, PAUL ZIMMERMAN WAS WORKING IN HIS DAIRY BARN, WHICH WAS HEATED WITH A WOOD-BURNING STOVE. AFTER HE'D GONE TO BED, HE GOT A CALL FROM HIS DAUGHTER, WHO WAS ABOUT TWO MILES AWAY, ASKING WHAT WAS ON FIRE. THE FIRE HAD SPREAD FROM THE STOVE, ENGULFING THE BARN.

Paul Zimmerman: SO I WENT RUNNING OUT AND WHEN I STEPPED OUTSIDE THE MAIN ROOF OF THE BARN HAD ALREADY FALLEN IN, AND THAT WAS AN HOUR AFTER I CHECKED IT.

ZIMMERMAN AND HIS SON GOT BUSY TRYING TO GET THE 85 COWS OUT OF THE BURNING BARN.

Paul Zimmerman: OF COURSE THE BARN WAS JUST TOTALLY FILLED WITH SMOKE, BUT WE WERE ABLE TO GET THEM ALL OUT, ALL BUT ONE, THAT WE GOT OUT. PUT THOSE OUT BACK IN ANOTHER PEN AND IN THE MORNING WE WENT BACK AND THEY WERE ALL IN PRETTY BAD SHAPE. THEY HAD BURN MARKS ON THEM AND SINGED HAIR.

BECAUSE OF THEIR INJURIES, ZIMMERMAN HAD TO SEND ALL BUT TEN TO A PACKING PLANT. AND NOW, WITH THE HELP OF NEIGHBORS, AND FRIENDS FROM HIS MENNONITE CHURCH, HIS NEW BARN IS ALMOST READY.

Jeff Beach: THE ZIMMERMANS HOPE TO HAVE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED HEAD OF CATTLE BACK AT THE FARM IN JUST A MATTER OF WEEKS.

Paul Zimmerman: THAT'S BEEN A REAL BLESSING FOR US, THE PEOPLE THAT DROPPED EVERYTHING AND CAME TO HELP.

NEAR BROOTEN, MINNESOTA, THIS IS JEFF BEACH FOR AGWEEK.

ZIMMERMAN DOESN'T THINK HE'LL BE ABLE TO REPLACE THE DAIRY EQUIPMENT THAT BURNED, SO HE PLANS TO SWITCH TO BEEF CATTLE.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV,

A MINNESOTA WOMAN IS RAISING A UNIQUE BREED OF HORSES, WE'LL TELL YOU ABOUT GYPSY VANNERS.

THE AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR IS SPONSORED BY 701x,TRANS OVA AND FARMERS MUTUAL OF NEBRASKA.

A NORTHWEST MINNESOTA WOMAN IS BREEDING AN UNUSUAL TYPE OF HORSE. AND KATIE DOLAN HAS BIG PLANS FOR HER GYPSY VANNERS. IT'S THE LATEST STOP ON OUR AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR.

Katie Dolan: I KNEW I JUST REALLY WANTED TO GET IN AND FIGURE OUT HOW TO GET ONE OF THESE MAGICAL HORSES.

IT ALL STARTED WHEN KATIE DOLAN SAW A PICTURE OF A GYPSY VANNER HORSE ONLINE. SHE TRACKED ONE DOWN IN 2014. SHE LOVES BREEDING THESE SPECIAL HORSES. THEY'RE DRAFT HORSES LIKE CLYDESDALES, BUT SMALLER, WITH THE FLASHINESS OF ARABIANS, AND A GENTLE DEMEANOR.

Katie Dolan: THEY'RE LIKE MAGNIFICENT. THEY'RE SO AWESOME, SO I LOVE THAT I AM KIND OF PART OF THE ORIGINAL GROUND FORCE. YOU KNOW, I CAME IN FAIRLY EARLY, THERE ARE SOME BREEDERS THAT HAVE BEEN IN IT LONGER THAN ME, AND I LEARN MORE EVERY YEAR. I WANT TO BE PART OF PRESERVING THIS BREED FOR EVERYBODY.

GYPSY VANNERS ORIGINATED IN ENGLAND AND IRELAND. THE NAME STEMS FROM THE JOB THEY DID THERE.

Katie Dolan: THE ROMANY PEOPLE, THE GYPSY PEOPLE, USED THEM FOR PULLING CARAVANS. SO THAT'S WHERE, WHEN THEY CAME TO AMERICA THEY WERE CALLED THE GYPSY VANNER.

HER FIRST HORSE, PRESLEY, WON THE GYPSY VANNER HORSE SOCIETY'S ALL AROUND HORSE OF THE YEAR IN 2019, AND DOLAN HOPES HE'LL HAVE ENOUGH POINTS BY THIS SUMMER TO GO INTO THE GROUP'S HALL OF FAME.

DOLAN SAYS GYPSY VANNERS ARE GREAT FOR RIDING. HER ULTIMATE GOAL IS TO BUILD A HEATED ARENA, FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES TO COME OUT AND RIDE IN THE WINTER, AND ADD CARRIAGE RIDES AND OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS IN THE SUMMER.

Katie Dolan: I THINK WHATEVER YOU CAN THINK UP TO DO WITH THEM, THEY'RE GAME. THEY'RE LIKE BRING IT ON, LET'S DO IT!

DOLAN NAMED HER NEWEST FILLY "HOPE" AS A TRIBUTE TO THE PLIGHT OF UKRAINE.

SHE ALSO OWNS A DOG BOARDING BUSINESS.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

SUGARBEET COMPANIES IN THE REGION ARE MAKING GOOD PROGRESS ON SLICING AND PROCESSING.

AND WE PROFILE A DISTILLING COMPANY THAT USES ONLY ORGANIC, LOCALLY SOURCED PRODUCTS TO PRODUCE ITS VARIOUS SPIRITS

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV FROM THE AGWEEK FARM SHOW IN ROCHESTER.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , OR FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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