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AgweekTV Full Show: Tharaldson Ethanol deals with big loss, Lida Farm, labor shortage hits South Dakota co-op

This week on AgweekTV, the Casselton ethanol plant suffered a big loss with the death of its COO. We talk with owner Gary Tharaldson. This is the best time of year for people who like their produce straight from the farm. And, a South Dakota elevator takes a drastic measure to fill a serious labor shortage.

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This week on AgweekTV, the Casselton ethanol plant suffered a big loss with the death of its COO. We talk with owner Gary Tharaldson. This is the best time of year for people who like their produce straight from the farm. And, a South Dakota elevator takes a drastic measure to fill a serious labor shortage.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

AROUND 30 THOUSAND FARMERS AND PRODUCERS ATTEND MINNESOTA'S LARGEST FARM SHOW EACH YEAR.

FARMFEST TOOK PLACE AGAIN THIS WEEK IN CENTRAL MINNESOTA. NEW PRODUCTS, DEMONSTRATIONS AND TIMELY AG ISSUES WERE ALL ON THE DOCKET.

OUR JEFF BEACH WAS THERE AND HAS MORE...

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< Jeff: The Farm Bill is something that affects all commodity groups, and many of those groups are represented at a Farm Fest panel discussion on the Farm Bill and the upcoming negotiations. The panelists were in agreement that commodity groups need to work together to make the farm bill as successful as it can be for all of agriculture.

Don Schiefelbein: The Farm Bill can't be about picking winners and losers. It's got to be just about doing the right thing by everybody that you're not saying I am going to favor this group or that group. We're just going to do right by everybody.

American Soybean Association board member George Goblish is concerned about diversifying soybean export markets.

George Goblish: The MAP and FMD programs are truly the the gateway into new countries and right now it's just short funded. We're asking to double those two programs.

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Terry Wolters of the National Pork Producers wants this farm bill to do a better job of being ready for disease outbreaks among livestock.

Terry Wolters: African swine fever is in the Dominican, and that's the closest it's been in the western Hemisphere since the seventies. So we really are counting on USDA to support us.

American Farm Bureau Scott VanderWal says one issue is a clear priority.

Scott VanderWal: The thing we here I remember saying more than anything else is protect crop insurance and make sure that that's preserved. Crop insurance is a federal program that works. It's efficient and it does its job by keeping people in business when they really need it.>

Jeff: REDUCING RISK AND VOLATILITY IN THE AG MARKETS WAS THE TOPIC OF ANOTHER DISCUSSION AT FARMFEST.KENT BEADLE OF CHS HEDGING TALKED ABOUT THE INVASION OF UKRAINE AND SAYS IT'S GOING TO TAKE A LOT MORE THAN A PIECE OF PAPER TO GET GRAIN SHIPPED OUT. BEADLE CALLS THE RECENT AGREEMENT WITH RUSSIA VERY DIFFICULT TO EXECUTE, AND HE DOESN'T THINK SHIPMENTS IN AND OUT OF BLACK SEA PORTS WILL HAPPEN.

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KENT: THERE'S ALSO RISK FROM THE INSURER'S STANDPOINT THAT ARE GOING TO MAKE COSTS TO GET GRAIN OUT OF UKRAINE VERY EXPENSIVE. SO IT'S PROBABLY NOT GOING TO BE THE KIND OF QUANTITY OF GRAIN THE U.N. WAS HOPING FOR.

JEFF: WHAT ABOUT THE QUALITY OF GRAIN COMING OUT OF UKRAINE?

KENT: RIGHT NOW THERE'S A LOT OF GRAIN THAT WAS ESSENTIALLY IN SHIP HOLDS AND IT'S BEEN THERE FOR ABOUT FIVE MONTHS. MOST OF THAT WAS CORN. WE THINK THAT IT'S LIKELY GOING OUT OF CONDITION, WHICH MEANS IT'S GOING OFF GRADE AND NEEDS TO FIND A HOME IN SOME NON TRADITIONAL SPOTS, ALSO MAKING IT A LITTLE MORE DIFFICULT AND A LITTLE TIMELY AND COSTLY TO GET THAT GRAIN MOVED.

JEFF ON CAM: AGWEEK WILL HAVE MORE FROM FARMFEST, NEAR REDWOOD FALLS MINNESOTA, LATER IN OUR SHOW.>

THANKS JEFF.

THE FARM AND AGRI-BUSINESS LABOR SHORTAGE FORCED THE FARMERS CO-OP ELEVATOR IN ROSHOLT, SOUTH DAKOTA TO HIRE OUTSIDE CONTRACTORS TO FILL THEIR SUMMER LABOR NEEDS.

(VO)

{CG: Ag Labor Shortage // Rosholt Elevator Hired Trucking Co. }

IT'S A TOWN OF ABOUT 430 PEOPLE IN NORTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA. THE ELEVATOR HANDLES AROUND TEN MILLION BUSHELS OF GRAIN A YEAR. IN ADDITION THEY OFFER FULL SERVICE AGRONOMY. THEY HAVE TWENTY FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, AND ABOUT TEN SEASONAL. IN THE PAST, THEY HAVE PAID ABOUT TWENTY DOLLARS AN HOUR FOR SEASONAL DRIVERS. BUT WITH DIFFICULTY FINDING EMPLOYEES THIS SPRING,THEY RAISED IT TO THIRTY. THEY STILL HAD NO RESPONSE, SO THEY HIRED OUTSIDE TRUCKING FIRMS TO FILL THE GAPS. IT WAS EXPENSIVE, BUT BUT ELEVATOR MANAGER BRAD TANGEN THINKS THE AG LABOR PROBLEM IS ONLY GOING TO GET WORSE.

(SOT)

[16]

{CG: Brad Tangen // Farmers Coop Elevator - Rosholt, SD }

<2723 :52 Brad Tangen: IN THESE SMALL TOWNS YOU DON'T GET A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT STICK AROUND, AND WANT TO WORK HERE. THEY MOVE ON TO BIGGER CITIES, AND WITH THE AGING POPULATION IN THIS AREA, IT'S JUST REALLY BECOME A CHALLENGE.>

(CONT. VO)

ALTHOUGH HIRING TRUCKING FIRMS ADDED TO THE COST, TANGEN SAYS HE'S GRATEFUL THEY WERE ABLE TO STEP UP TO HELP THE CO-OP AND COMMUNITY THROUGH A TIGHT SEASONAL SCHEDULE.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA'S 'FOREVER GREEN' INITIATIVE IS AN EFFORT TO DEVELOP MORE CROPS THAT CAN STAY IN THE GROUND YEAR-ROUND, AND CONVINCE FARMERS TO PLANT THEM.

(VO)

{CG: Forever Green Initiative // Perennial Crops in Annual Systems }

THE IDEA IS TO HELP MAKE FARMERS MORE PROFITABLE, WHILE PROTECTING THE SOIL AND WATER BY PUTTING PERENNIAL CROPS INTO ANNUAL CROPPING SYSTEMS.

DON WYSE IS AN AGRONOMY PROFESSOR AT THE U OF M, AND CO-DIRECTOR OF THE 'FOREVER GREEN' INITIATIVE. IT'S A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN LAWMAKERS, COMPANIES, AND PRODUCERS. SO FAR, RESEARCHERS HAVE DEVELOPED 16 CROPS CAPABLE OF THRIVING IN THE UPPER MIDWEST.

(SOT)

[17]

{CG: Don Wyse // Forever Green Initiative }

(CONT. VO)STATE SENATOR TORREY WESTROM CHAIRS THE SENATE AG COMMITTEE. HE SAYS THE PROJECT BRINGS GOOD VALUE FOR GROWERS AND TAXPAYERS(SOT)[10]{CG: Sen.Torrey Westrom // (R) Elbow Lake }(CONT. VO)THE FOREVER GREEN INITIATIVE WAS FOUNDED IN 2012.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, MIKKEL PATES TALKS WITH GARY THARALDSON ABOUT THE FUTURE OF HIS ETHANOL PLANT, AFTER THE DEATH OF COO RYAN THORPE.

THARALDSON COMPANIES FOUNDER GARY THARALDSON IS WELL KNOWN AS THE WEALTHIEST PERSON IN NORTH DAKOTA.

IN LIGHT OF THE RECENT PASSING OF THARALDSON ETHANOL C.O.O. RYAN THORPE, AGWEEK'S MIKKEL PATES SAT DOWN WITH THE WELL KNOWN ENTREPRENEUR TO GET HIS THOUGHTS ON THE TRAGEDY, THE FUTURE OF HIS PLANT, AND THE ETHANOL INDUSTRY.

(AS LIVE)

[2:29]

{CG: Mikkel Pates // mpates@agweek.com}

{CG: Gary Tharaldson // Founder - Tharaldson Companies}

{CG: Gary Tharaldson // Launched Tharaldson Ethanol Plant in '08 }

Gary Tharaldson: That's correct. He was he was the face of our company, really. And he's just a wonderful man. And it was a very tough loss. He had this personality that was a plus. And not only that, he was smart and he was fun to be around. You know, and it it's big change.Is there any particular piece of this that you'd say his fingerprint will always be on because of his involvement in it?Gary Tharaldson: I think where his fingerprint is on it is the relationship with all the other plants. Ryan was so proud of what we're doing out at the plant. And of course, Ryan's a big reason why that plant is what it is today.Was this a surprise?Gary Tharaldson: It was totally unexpected. The plant is going to, you know, continue to do really well because of his help in getting it done.Tell me how the ethanol thing came into being.Gary Tharaldson: What we did in the early days, all we did was make make ethanol and we sold the distillers grains. Then about five years ago, we started adding corn oil as a product that we would be selling. Now we're transforming the ethanol plant into a bio chemical plant. And what that means is we're not going to depend on ethanol per se, but we are more interested in how we can can create the byproduct which would make it more stable.So the thing is, we're just adding an addition to the plant, which where we'll take the distillers grains and extract the protein meal from it. And then so we'll be able to sell protein to feeder cattle, birds, fish, and of course, it should increase our profits by doing that. And the other thing you're probably hearing a lot about the CO2, the carbon capture.So that's in place. The pipeline from Iowa to North Dakota is is is being in progress. Hopefully start building sometime next year and will capture the CO2. We produce 570,000 tons of carbon a year. So but now instead of going into the air, it'll be captured and put it in a pipeline.Gary Tharaldson, North Dakota Businessman and ethanol man, thank you for taking the time with us.>(BACK ON CAM)THARALDSON WAS KNOWN FOR OWNING A CHAIN OF 140 HOTELS, BUT SOLD THEM FOR MORE THAN A BILLION DOLLARS. HE USED SOME OF THE PROCEEDS TO BUILD THE ETHANOL PLANT IN 2008.

IT'S THE TIME OF YEAR TO ENJOY FRESH PRODUCE FROM THE GARDEN, OR A FARMERS MARKET. IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, ROSE DUNN VISITED A SMALL FARM IN WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA THAT LOVES TO SHARE ITS BOUNTY.

(PKG)

[1:47]

{CG: Ryan Pesch // Lida Farm - Pelican Rapids, MN }

{CG: Maree Pesch // Manna Food Coop - Detroit Lakes, MN }

{CG: Rose Dunn // Lida Farm - Pelican Rapids, MN }

RYAN PESCH DIDN'T GROW UP ON A FARM, BUT IN COLLEGE HE BECAME INTERESTED IN THE LOCAL FOOD MOVEMENT.Ryan Pesch: I DON'T KNOW, I JUST HAD AN INTEREST IN FARMING. I GOT INTO LIKE KIND OF THE FOOD MOVEMENT THROUGH THE FOOD COOP IN SAINT PETER, AT GUSTAVUS. IT'S JUST SOMETHING I WANTED TO EXPLORE AFTER I GRADUATED.BUT AFTER COLLEGE RYAN TOOK A JOB AS AN EXTENSION EDUCATOR FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. THAT'S WHAT BROUGHT THE PESCHES TO THIS AREA, AND IN 2004 THEY THIS BOUGHT THIS 20 ACRE PARCEL OF ROLLING FARMLAND NEAR LAKE LIDA.But you know once they start going, they really start going.THAT FIRST YEAR THEY SOLD TWO SUBSCRIPTIONS TO SOMETHING NEW TO THE AREA, CSA BOXESRyan Pesch: AND THEN WE'VE JUST KIND OF GROWN IT EVER SINCE. SO TWO RANDOM CSA MEMBERS IN 2004, AND WE GOT UP TO, LAST YEAR WE HAD 124 MEMBERS.Ryan: People like them this size.IN ADDITION TO WORKING AT LIDA FARM, RYAN'S WIFE MAREE IS THE INTERIM MANAGER AT THE MANNA FOOD COOP IN DETROIT LAKES. IT'S ALSO WHERE THEY DROP OFF THE WEEKLY LIDA FARM CSA BOXES.Maree Pesch: RYAN AND I HAVE THE SALAD MIX, GREEN BEANS AND ZUCCHINI HERE FOR NOW.THE COOP RECENTLY MOVED TO A NEW, HIGH-VISIBILITY LOCATION IN DOWNTOWN DETROIT LAKES, AND THEY'RE WORKING TO BRING MORE FRESH, LOCAL, AND ORGANIC PRODUCTS TO THE COMMUNITY, INCLUDING SOME FROM LIDA FARM.Maree Pesch: IF WE HAVE A SOME GAPS, OR IF WE'RE LONG ON SOMETHING THAT WE KNOW WOULD SELL WELL WE BRING IT IN. BUT LIKE WE HAD A LOT OF BEANS THIS WEEK, SO I THOUGHT I'M JUST GOING TO PUT OUR BEANS OUT BECAUSE IT'S BETTER THAN WHAT I CAN GET RIGHT NOW.Rose Dunn: IN ADDITION TO THE CSA SUBSCRIPTIONS AND SELLING THEIR PRODUCE AT THE MANNA FOOD COOP, THE PESCHES SELL THEIR PRODUCE AT AREA FARMERS MARKETS, AND THEY KEEP THIS FARM STAND AT THE END OF THEIR DRIVEWAY STOCKED 24 HOURS A DAY, ON THE HONOR SYSTEM. Ryan Pesch: Ha ha I LIKE A WHOLE BUNCH OF DIFFERENT WAYS OF SELLING.NEAR PELICAN RAPIDS, MINNESOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.>(OTS: BACK ON CAM)THE PESCHES THREE KIDS ALSO HELP OUT AT LIDA FARM, WHEN THEY'RE NOT BUSY WITH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. THE FARM WILL BE HOSTING THE PUBLIC AT THE "DEEP ROOTS" AG FESTIVAL ON SEPTEMBER 10TH. YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW SOME GROWERS ARE INCREASING YIELDS, WHILE CUTTING COSTS.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

MANY PRODUCERS ARE LOOKING FOR WAYS TO DECREASE THEIR INPUT COSTS WITHOUT THEIR CROPS AND YIELDS TAKING A HIT. THE RISING COST OF FERTILIZER IS TAKING A TOLL ON FARMERS' WALLETS, BUT ONE WAY TO CUT THAT COST IS TO USE NANO-LIQUID TECHNOLOGY FOR A MORE EFFICIENT DELIVERY OF NUTRIENTS TO THE SOIL. I VISITED WITH A FARMER IN DAVENPORT, NORTH DAKOTA WHO USES THIS NANO LIQUID TECHNOLOGY ON HIS OWN ACRES.

(PKG)

[2:20]

{CG: Brad Kellerman // Davenport, ND}

{CG: Brad Kellerman // Davenport, ND}

Brad Kellerman: Approximately four years. Being interested in the biological side of farming, it seemed to fit in with what I was trying to do. The use rate is as, like four ounces an acre, which is a very low use rate. Being able to talk with the company, people that actually developed the product directly. I appreciate their time and their willingness to share that information.And what are some of those products that you've switched to from conventional to that nano liquid technology?Brad Kellerman: You know, there's there's different nano products. Nano K, Nano pack are a few that we've used. We've started using the Nano CS for infra starter fertilizer, which in soybeans is something fairly new for me. We've never used the starter fertilizer in soybeans before.And as you're looking at the results, how have they been and has that impacted your overall input costs?Brad Kellerman: I've been encouraged because it seems like I continue to learn more. So I consider it another tool in the toolbox that works very well in combination with many other things.And if you were to talk to a producer that's kind of on the fence about using this product, what would you say to them?Brad Kellerman: The flexibility and the ease of use of many different products I've used over the years, it seems to be, it just seems to fit really well and I just haven't had any mixing issues or anything like that. So we'll cut the use rate of, say like a standard starter it works out well.So how has this nano liquid technology impacted your yield?Brad Kellerman: Yield wise, what I look for is, I look for a return, not necessarily just a dollar per acre investment, but how much does it cost me per bushel to produce? And that's really what I'm looking for. It's an ongoing process. I'm definmtely on the road to use this and make it work, because it shows promise to me>(GRAPHIC)TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW AQUA YIELD WORKS, CONTACT JIM ERICKSON AT E.C.O. AT THE NUMBER OR EMAIL ON YOUR SCREEN.{CG: Graphic:Aqua-Yield Information //Erickson Custom Operations //701 371-7184 //email: erickson.customoperations@outlook.com //website: www.ericksoncustomoperations.com }

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, IT'S NOT ALL BUSINESS AT FARMFEST.. WE'LL SHOW YOU SOME OF THE FUN.

FARMFEST IN MINNESOTA WASN'T JUST ABOUT ISSUES, NEW PRODUCTS AND MAKING CONNECTIONS. IT WAS ALSO ABOUT FUN!

(VO)

{CG: Hay Bale Art Auction // Farmfest - Redwood Falls, MN}

4-H AND FFA GROUPS THROUGHOUT THE STATE WERE ENCOURAGED TO BUILD HAY BALE ART TO BENEFIT THEIR ORGANIZATIONS. THE TOP CREATIONS WERE AUCTIONED OFF AT FARMFEST, WITH THE PROCEEDS GOING TO THE GROUPS THAT CREATED THEM.

THERE WAS ALSO THE EVER-POPULAR KIDS PEDAL PULL RACES. KIDS AGES 4 TO 11 PEDALED THE WEIGHTED SLED AS FAR AS THEY COULD, WITH HOPES OF ADVANCING TO THE STATE FINALS IN FAIRMONT.

(GRAPHIC-start credits music now)

{CG: Graphic:

ONLY ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE //

UPCOMING STORIES THIS WEEK //

- Check in on progress of U.S. Sugarbeet crop //

//

- Red River Valley farm providing quality genetics for Show Goat scene //

// }

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

WE'LL CHECK ON THE PROGRESS OF THE U.S. SUGARBEET CROP.

AND WE'LL VISIT A RED RIVER VALLEY FARM THAT'S PROVIDING QUALITY GENETICS FOR THE AREA'S SHOW GOAT SCENE.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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