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AgweekTV Full Show: Tax and environmental policies, February WASDE, H-2A, Tuttle Rural Innovation Center

This week on AgweekTV, some farm groups express concerns about possible changes in tax and environmental policies in the Biden administration. There are some surprises in the February WASDE report. We'll have analysis. There could be good news for farmers needing foreign workers under the H-2A visa program. And one small town turns its former school into a center for rural innovation.

This week on AgweekTV, some farm groups express concerns about possible changes in tax and environmental policies in the Biden administration. There are some surprises in the February WASDE report. We'll have analysis. There could be good news for farmers needing foreign workers under the H-2A visa program. And one small town turns its former school into a center for rural innovation.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

\u0009FARM GROUPS ARE EXPRESSING SOME CONCERN ABOUT POTENTIAL CHANGES FOR AGRICULTURE UNDER THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION, FROM TAXES TO ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS.

\u0009FARMERS FEAR A CHANGE IN TAX POLICY, WHICH THEY SAY WAS FAVORABLE UNDER THE PREVIOUS PRESIDENT. THEY POINT TO POSSIBLE REVISIONS IN THE ESTATE TAX PROVISIONS AND THE ELIMINATION OF THE STEPPED UP BASIS WHICH COULD MAKE IT NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO PASS DOWN THE FARM TO THE NEXT GENERATION.

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Bob Worth: I bought my farm a long long time ago and I don't have much of a basis in it and today's land has gotten very high. So it could really cost Sam a lot of money just to even inherit the farm.

\u0009WORTH SAYS RE-INSTITUTING VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS ROLLED BACK UNDER THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION COULD ALSO POTENTIALLY BURDEN AGRICULTURE AND THEY'RE KEEPING A CLOSE EYE ON THE WATERS OF THE U.S. RULE.

\u0009NORTH DAKOTA SENATORS KEVIN CRAMER AND JOHN HOEVEN AREN'T TAKING ANY CHANCES AND ISSUED A RESOLUTION TO UPHOLD THE NAVIGABLE WATERS PROTECTION RULE, WHICH REPLACES WOTUS.

\u0009FORMER HOUSE AG COMMITTEE CHAIR COLLIN PETERSON IS ALSO WARNING FARMERS ABOUT THE POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS THAT COULD RESULT FROM THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION'S CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY.

\u0009PETERSON SPOKE AT THE ANNUAL AMERICAN SUGARBEET GROWERS ASSOCIATION VIRTUAL MEETING. HE SAYS HE'S NOT SURE HOW THE SUGAR INDUSTRY WILL BE ABLE TO POSITION ITSELF TO HELP WITH CLIMATE CHANGE, BUT THEY NEED TO BE PROACTIVE TO ENSURE THEIR FUTURE. HE SAYS THE SUGAR INDUSTRY IS CURRENTLY IN A GOOD SPOT WITH CURRENT FARM BILL POLICY.

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Collin Peterson: I'm glad we've got the Moen increases locked in for sugar. We've got a program that's good. And I think that the attitude is just 'Keep what we got.' And don't let them undermine it.

\u0009PETERSON SAYS ANOTHER ISSUE TO LOOK OUT FOR IS A PUSH FOR PAYMENT LIMITS ON FARM PROGRAM PAYMENTS FOR CROPS.

\u0009FARM GROUPS ARE MIXED ON THE PROPOSED MERGER OF THE SOUTH DAKOTA DEPARTMENTS OF AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES.

\u0009GOVERNOR NOEM SUBMITTED AN EXECUTIVE ORDER OUTLINING THE MERGER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE 2021 SESSION.

SO FAR THE STATE'S PORK AND SOYBEAN FARMERS ARE NEUTRAL, FARMERS UNION IS IN OPPOSITION, BUT THE STATE FARM BUREAU, CATTLEMEN'S AND DAIRY PRODUCERS ASSOCIATIONS SUPPORT THE PROPOSAL.

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Steve Ollerich: It would save a lot of money, but it streamlines things too so we can go to just one office when you have to review your permit or you have to get paperwork done.

\u0009HUNTER ROBERTS WOULD BECOME SECRETARY OF THE NEW DEPARTMENT OF AG AND NATURAL RESOURCES. BUT WON'T WORK ALONE.

Marv Post: The Lieutenant Governor, in this case a rancher, will be the spokesperson for production ag and so who better to have the ear of the Governor than the Lieutenant Governor?

\u0009POST THINKS LEGISLATORS WILL APPROVE THE MERGER.

IF THEY DON'T PASS A RESOLUTION DISAPPROVING IT WITHIN 90 DAYS, IT AUTOMATICALLY GOES INTO EFFECT.

\u0009USDA PROVIDED A BEARISH SURPRISE FOR CORN IN THE FEBRUARY WASDE REPORT.

\u0009USDA ONLY LOWERED ENDING STOCKS 50 MILLION BUSHELS BY INCREASING EXPORTS THE SAME AMOUNT. BUT THAT WAS NEARLY 140 MILLION ABOVE ESTIMATES.

\u0009U.S. SOYBEAN ENDING STOCKS WERE CUT 20 MILLION BUSHELS, BY INCREASING EXPORTS. PUTTING THE STOCKS TO USE RATIO AT 2.65-PERCENT. SOUTH AMERICAN PRODUCTION WAS LEFT UNCHANGED.

\u0009AND U.S. WHEAT CARRYOUT WAS UNCHANGED, BUT WORLD STOCKS WERE LOWERED 9 MILLION METRIC TONS.

JOINING US WITH MARKET ANALYSIS IS BRYAN STROMMEN AND WHEN WE LOOK AT THE REPORT BRIAN, THE CORN MARKET, THAT'S WHERE WE SAW PROBABLY THE BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT IN THE REPORT.

Bryan Strommen: YOU KNOW WE REALLY DID, MICHELLE. I THINK YOU KNOW OUR EXPORTS WERE ONLY INCREASED 50 MILLION BUSHELS AND THE EXPECTATIONS WERE FOR THEM TO BE MAYBE 200 TO 250 MILLION. AND THEN THE WORLD NUMBERS TOO. EXPECTATIONS WERE FOR THOSE STOCKS TO BE LOWERED BUT YET THEY WERE INCREASED.

THE CONFUSING PART WAS USDA INCREASED CHINA IMPORTS OF CORN BY ABOUT 250 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT ONLY INCREASED U.S. EXPORTS BY 50 MILLION BUSHELS. OK THAT DOESN'T JIVE FOR ME.

Bryan Strommen: YEAH, THERE'S A LOT OF QUESTIONS WITH THAT. I THINK WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE DEMAND SIDE OF THE BALANCE SHEET, AND CHINA'S APPETITE A FEW WEEKS AGO, YOU KNOW THEY HAD A HUGE WEEK OF IMPORTS OF CORN HERE FROM THE U.S. WE ARE THE CHEAPEST PRICED CORN IN THE WORLD, AND WHEN YOU INCREASE THEIR IMPORT DEMAND BY 250 MILLION BUSHELS AND OUR EXPORTS ONLY BY 50 MILLION, WHERE'S THAT EXCESS CORN GOING TO COME FROM?

ABSOLUTELY. SO WE SCORED NEW CONTRACT HIGHS ON TUESDAY, AND THEN THE MARKET KIND OF SOLD OFF, SO DOES THAT KIND OF HOLD, AS FAR AS OUR HIGH HERE FOR THE TIME BEING YOU THINK?

SO TECHNICALLY YES, WE DID SEE SOME DAMAGE IN THE CHARTS FUNDAMENTALLY. AGAIN, OUR STOCKS ARE LOWER, AND WE'LL HAVE TO MONITOR THAT EXPORT DEMAND AS WE MOVE FORWARD.

SOYBEAN ENDING STOCKS CAME IN ABOUT WHERE WE THOUGHT, BUT AT 120 MILLION BUSHELS THERE'S STILL SOME SKEPTICS THAT THINK WE NEED TO COME DOWN MORE. DO YOU THINK USDA WILL DO THAT IN SUBSEQUENT REPORTS?

IT'LL BE INTERESTING TO SEE WHAT HAPPENS. AND I THINK WE HAVE TO LOOK AT EXPORT DEMAND AS WE MOVE FORWARD. THERE'S A LOT OF TALK NOW THAT SINCE BRAZIL IS ONLINE AND HARVESTING THAT MAYBE SOME OF THAT CHINESE DEMAND MOVES OVER TO BRAZIL. WE'LL HAVE TO CONTINUE TO WATCH THAT AS WE MOVE FORWARD, BUT OUR STOCKS ARE AT A SEVEN YEAR LOW, SO WE'RE IN A TIGHT SITUATION AS FAR AS SOYBEANS GO.

SO BRIAN DO YOU THINK THE HIGH IS IN, IN SOYBEANS THAT WE HIT IN JANUARY?

Bryan Strommen: I THINK WE STILL HAVE TO SEE THOSE PRICES BE SUPPORTED AND BE HIGHER. WE ARE THE CHEAPEST PRICED SOYBEANS IN THE WORLD, AND LOWER PRICES AREN'T GOING TO CURB DEMAND, SO WE NEED TO AGAIN, HAVE SOME HIGHER PRICES TO SLOW DOWN THAT DEMAND.

SO THE U.S WHEAT STOCKS WERE LEFT UNCHANGED IN THE REPORT. THE BIG SURPRISE PROBABLY, OR THE BIG CHANGE, WASS THE WORLD PRODUCTION NUMBERS OR THE ENDING STOCKS NUMBERS, RIGHT?

Bryan Strommen: YOU'RE EXACTLY RIGHT. I THINK WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE WHEAT NUMBERS STOCKS WERE BASICALLY LEFT UNCHANGED, ESTIMATES WERE FOR THE STOCKS TO BE SLIGHTLY TIGHTER FOR THE WORLD PRODUCTION, BUT THEY WERE LOWERED NINE MILLION METRIC TONS, SO THAT WAS A BIG CUT AS FAR AS WORLD STOCKS GO ON THE WHEAT SIDE OF THE BALANCE SHEET.

AND WHEAT PRICES, THEY HAVE TO KIND OF KEEP UP WITH CORN AND BEANS HERE AS WE GET INTO THE ACREAGE BATTLE NOW, RIGHT?

WE DO. I MEAN RIGHT NOW WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE INPUTS THAT IT TAKES TO PRODUCE WHEAT, VERSUS POSSIBLY SOYBEANS, THERE'S NOT A LOT OF INCENTIVE TO PLANT WHEAT.

WELL THANKS FOR YOUR ANALYSIS TODAY BRIAN STROMMEN JOINING US WITH PROGRSSIVE AG.

\u0009THE U.S. CENSUS BUREAU RELEASED U.S. EXPORT TOTALS FOR 2020 AND IT LOOKS LIKE CHINA MISSED THE MARK ON THEIR PHASE ONE TRADE DEAL OBLIGATIONS.

\u0009TOTAL CHINA PURCHASES WERE ESTIMATED AT $28.75 BILLION, WHICH FALLS SHORT OF THE $36.5 BILLION THEY COMMITTED TO. SOYBEANS ACCOUNTED FOR THE LARGEST SHARE AT MORE THAN $14 BILLION, PORK EXPORTS TO CHINA CAME IN AT $2.28 BILLION, WITH COTTON AT $1.8 BILLION, AND CORN AT $1.21 BILLION, FOLLOWED BY WHEAT, BEEF AND DDGS.

Katie Pinke: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TAKE YOU TO A TOWN OF 58 PEOPLE. THEY'VE TURNED THEIR SCHOOL INTO A RURAL INNOVATION CENTER.

\u0009MANY FARMS RELY ON TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR SEASONAL HELP.

\u0009THE PANDEMIC HALTED THOSE PLANS FOR THE 2020 SEASON, LEAVING MANY FARMERS SCRAMBLING FOR HELP.

\u0009BUT ANOTHER YEAR OF INTERRUPTION MAY HAVE BEEN AVOIDED THROUGH THE H-2A VISA PROGRAM.

\u0009THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION HAS ANNOUNCED THAT H-2A VISITING EMPLOYEES FROM SOUTH AFRICA ARE CONSIDERED "ESSENTIAL WORKERS" AND WILL BE ALLOWED INTO THE U.S.

\u0009CHAD OLSEN USES ABOUT 65 WORKERS FROM SOUTH AFRICA ON HIS CUSTOM COMBINE OPERATION BASED IN SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA. HE SAYS THERE ARE A LOT OF UNKNOWNS RIGHT NOW, MAKING IT TOUGH TO PLAN THE SEASON, BUT HE'S FEELING MORE OPTIMISTIC. LAST YEAR HE HAD TO PUT TOGETHER A CREW USING FAMILY AND FRIENDS.

Chad Olsen: A MONTH DOWN THE ROAD WE'RE GOING TO KNOW MORE, AND IF IT'S LOOKING LIKE THESE GUYS AREN'T GOING TO BE AVAILABLE ON TIME, THEN I'M GOING TO START PUTTING ANOTHER CREW TOGETHER. ONE WAY OR ANOTHER WE'RE GOING TO FIGURE IT OUT.

\u0009ONE POSSIBLE HITCH IS SOUTH AFRICA IS CURRENTLY ON A LOCKDOWN, SO IT'S NOT KNOWN IF WORKERS WILL BE ABLE TO LEAVE.

\u0009A SMALL-TOWN SCHOOL IN CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA, THAT CLOSED MORE THAN A DECADE AGO, HAS NEW LIFE, AS A COMMUNITY CENTER.

\u0009IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, KATIE PINKE VISITS THE TUTTLE RURAL INNOVATION CENTER, TO SEE WHAT ONE SMALL TOWN HAS DONE TO PUT THEIR SCHOOL BUILDING BACK TO USE.

Burdell Johnson: WE DON'T JUST HAVE TOWN HERE, WE HAVE A COMMUNITY.

Katie Pinke: THE TUTTLE RURAL INNOVATION CENTER NOW FILLS THE HALLS OF THE TUTTLE SCHOOL. THE SPACE IS NOW GOING TO BE USED FOR COMMUNITY EVENTS, LOCAL FOODS, AND ALSO A MEETING SPACE FOR PEOPLE TO COME TO TUTTLE.

Burdell Johnson: WHEN THE SCHOOL CLOSED THE BUILDING WAS IN GREAT SHAPE, AND I DIDN'T WANT TO SEE IT TURN INTO AN EYESORE. BUT THE COMMUNITY, WE'VE HAD A LOT OF HELP FROM THE WHOLE COMMUNITY AND THE SURROUNDING AREA TO KEEP IT GOING.

TUTTLE, NORTH DAKOTA FARMER BURDELL JOHNSON BECAME ACTIVE WHEN THE SCHOOL CLOSED IN 2007, AFTER SERVING ON THE SCHOOL BOARD. HE WROTE GRANTS, AND ENCOURAGES OTHER FARMERS AND RANCHERS TO GET ACTIVE IN THEIR COMMUNITIES.

Burdell Johnson: THIS WAS KIND OF SET UP TO BE A DEMONSTRATION CENTER FOR WHAT OTHER COMMUNITIES COULD DO.

Katie Pinke: IT'S VOLUNTEERS LIKE SID LARSON THAT ALLOW THE TUTTLE RURAL INNOVATION CENTER TO WORK. HE BLOWS THE SNOW, AND THE COMMUNITY ROOM WAS JUST NAMED AFTER HIM.

Sid Larson: IF THIS COULD GET GOING I THINK IT COULD CREATE SOME MORE JOBS RIGHT AROUND HERE, AND HELP AND MAYBE DRAW SOME OF OUR YOUNGER GENERATION TO COME IN HERE AND GET THINGS GOING.

IT'S VOLUNTEERS LIKE LISA GOODMAN GETTING INVOLVED IN THE TUTTLE RURAL INNOVATION CENTER THAT MAKE IT A SUCCESS. SHE'S PLANNING A SUMMER QUILT SHOW.

Lisa Goodman: JUST HAVING A COMMUNITY THAT YOU FEEL YOU'RE A PART OF IS VERY IMPORTANT.

THIS REMOTE COMMUNITY AND REVITALIZED SCHOOL BUILDING, SETS AN EXAMPLE FOR WHAT RURAL COMMUNITIES CAN BE. IN TUTTLE, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS KATIE PINKE FOR AGWEEK.

\u0009THE CENTER HAS RECEIVED MORE THAN $400,000 IN GRANTS. THEY PLAN TO PLANT A HOMESTEAD BERRY GARDEN AND ORCHARD THIS SUMMER.

\u0009YOU CAN READ ALL ABOUT IT IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

\u0009MANY PRODUCERS HAVE BOOKED THEIR SEED FOR 2021 BUT SHOULD BE AWARE OF PROPER LABELING.

\u0009BY LAW, ALL SEED SOLD HAS TO BE LABELLED, REGARDLESS OF WHAT ITS USED FOR.

\u0009NORTH DAKOTA'S STATE SEED DEPARTMENT REGULATORY MANAGER SAYS NEVER BUY SEED WITHOUT A LABEL, AND BE SURE TO GET IT AT THE SAME TIME YOU GET THE SEED.

\u0009JASON GOLTZ SAYS THE LABELS PROVE THE SEED HAS BEEN TESTED FOR PURITY AND GERMINATION. THAT HELPS GROWERS DETERMINE IF ITS THE RIGHT VARIETY FOR THEIR OPERATION.

Jason Goltz: IT'S MAINLY A CONSUMER PROTECTION ISSUE, ALTHOUGH IT DOES PROTECT THE LABELER AS WELL. SO ALL SEED SOLD, REGARDLESS OF PLANTING PURPOSES HAS TO BE LABELED. / SO THE CONSUMER, WHO'S SPENDING QUITE A LOT OF MONEY, SHOULD HAVE SOME ASSURANCE OF WHAT THEY'RE PURCHASING.

\u0009GOLTZ SAYS THE LABEL SHOULD CONTAIN THE SEED ORIGIN, THE SELLER'S CONTACT INFORMATION AND A LOT NUMBER.

\u0009

AHEAD ON THE SHOW, WE'LL TAKE YOU TO A PREMIERE CATTLE BREEDING OPERATION, AS OUR AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR CONTINUES.

\u0009AND LATER, HOW ONE FARMERS MARKET IS FARING IN THIS SUBZERO COLD.

THIS WEEK'S ARCTIC BLAST WAS STRESSFUL FOR PRODUCERS AND LIVESTOCK. HOW LONG WILL IT LAST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

THE AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR IS SPONSORED BY TRANS OVA AND STOCKMENS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE.

\u0009WEBER BROTHERS CATTLE COMPANY IS STEPPING INTO THE FUTURE, SELLING ANGUS AND SIM-ANGUS BREEDING STOCK.

\u0009ON THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR, MIKKEL PATES VISITED THE LAKE BENTON, MINNESOTA OPERATION TO SEE HOW THEY'RE TAKING IT INTO THE NEXT GENERATION.

THE WEBER FAMILY STARTED FARMING AND RAISING LIVESTOCK HERE IN SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA IN THE 1940'S. TODAY THAT BUSINESS HAS EVOLVED FROM DAIRY CATTLE TO BEEF. THEY FOCUS ON SELLING HIGH QUALITY BREEDING BULLS AND HEIFERS.

JT Weber: WE THOUGHT, LONG TERM, WHERE WE BELONG, MORE WITH THE ANGUS SEED STOCK AND THE SIM-ANGUS SEED STOCK. CATTLE THAT WE THOUGHT WERE MORE SUSTAINABLE, AND CATTLE THAT JUST HAD MORE OF A LONG TERM FUTURE TO THEM. JUST GOOD SOLID CATTLE THAT WE COULD STAND BEHIND AND FEEL REALLY COMFORTABLE ABOUT WHEN WE SOLD EITHER BREEDING BULLS OR HEIFERS.

IN THE PAST FEW YEARS, WEBER BROTHERS CATTLE COMPANY HAS BUILT A NEW BARN, WHICH IS PARTLY HEATED. THAT MAKES IT HANDY AND COMFORTABLE TO PREPARE BULLS FOR SALE, OR DO EMBRYO WORK. AND TOMORROW'S GENERATION OF WEBERS IS ON THE RISE.

Jake Weber: I'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO RUN COWS.

JT'S SON JAKE IS EXCITED TO TAKE THE BUSINESS INTO THE FUTURE. DESPITE OBSTACLES, LIKE CHALLENGES IN SOCIAL MEDIA, FAKE MEAT AND ENVIRONMENTAL OVERREGULATION, JAKE SAYS THAT THERE WILL ALWAYS BE A PLACE FOR BEEF.

Jake Weber: I KNOW WE'RE UP AGAINST A LOT OF CHALLENGES, BUT I BELIEVE AT THE END OF THE DAY, THAT PEOPLE STILL LIKE THE TASTE OF IT, AND WILL PAY A PREMIUM FOR IT. THE WORLD POPULATION KEEPS GROWING, AND WE'RE FINDING NEW WAYS TO FEED THEM.

AND, THE WEBERS SAY IN ADDITION TO RAISING GOOD CATTLE, THEY'RE TAKING GOOD CARE OF THE LAND FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS. AT LAKE BENTON , MINNESOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

\u0009SUBZERO TEMPERATURES AREN'T STOPPING VENDORS, SHOPPERS, OR EVEN THE MUSICIANS AT THE ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA FARMERS MARKET.

\u0009THE MARKET IS HELD IN THE GRAHAM PARK BUILDING. THE TEMPERATURE INSIDE WAS ONLY ABOUT 40 DEGREES THIS WEEK, WHICH STILL FELT MUCH WARMER THAN THE AIR OUTSIDE.

\u0009THE MARKET'S NEW MANAGER, ABBY SHEPLER, HAS ONLY BEEN ON THE JOB A COUPLE OF WEEKS, BUT SHE SAYS THEY HAVE A STRONG CUSTOMER BASE THAT COMES OUT IN ANY WEATHER.

\u0009AND SHE SAYS THEY'RE TAKING PRECAUTIONS TO KEEP VENDORS AND CUSTOMERS SAFE.

Abby Shepler: I THINK THAT THE BIGGEST ISSUE THAT WE FACE IS MAKING SURE THAT IT'S SAFE FOR EVERYONE TO GET INTO THE MARKET, SO MAKING SURE THAT EVERYTHING IS PLOWED, THAT THERE'S SALT DOWN, BECAUSE WE DON'T WANT ANY INJURIES.

\u0009SHEPLER SAYS ONE ADVANTAGE TO THE COLD IS THAT IT'S BETTER FOR FOOD STORAGE AT THE MARKET.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, THIS COLD WEATHER IS PERFECT FOR BAKING BREAD.

\u0009OUR SUBZERO SPELL IS A PERFECT TIME TO DO A LITTLE BAKING, AND WHAT BETTER THAN A COMFORT FOOD LIKE WARM HOMEMADE BREAD? THIS MONTH CRISTEN CLARK IS SHARING HER FAVORITE BEGINNER BREAD RECIPE .

\u0009 SHE'S THE IOWA FARMER WHO WRITES THE "FOOD AND SWINE" BLOG, AND IS A MONTHLY AGWEEK MAGAZINE COLUMNIST AS WELL.

\u0009CLARK ALSO SHARES A MONTHLY VIDEO RECIPE WITH READERS AND VIEWERS OF AGWEEK. THIS MONTH, YOU CAN GO TO AGWEEK.COM AND WATCH CLARK MAKE FOCACCIA BREAD, WHICH SHE SAYS IS PERFECT FOR BEGINNING BREADMAKERS, AND CAN BE USED FOR ANYTHING FROM SANDWICHES TO DIPPING.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , AND YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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