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AgweekTV Full Show: Summer sales of E15, soybean plant concerns, salvage yard, diversified beef operation

This week on AgweekTV, the Biden administration will allow summer sales of E15. Some residents of Casselton, North Dakota, are concerned about plans for a soybean processing plant. We'll look at how today's wild economics affect one of the region's important salvage part and scrap businesses. And we'll visit a diversified cattle operation in Minnesota.

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This week on AgweekTV, the Biden administration will allow summer sales of E15. Some residents of Casselton, North Dakota, are concerned about plans for a soybean processing plant. We'll look at how today's wild economics affect one of the region's important salvage part and scrap businesses. And we'll visit a diversified cattle operation in Minnesota.

See more from AgweekTV
This week on AgweekTV, a new technology could come sweeping through ranchers' pastures. A group of farmers "lawyer up" for proper pay for using their land for the Red River Water Supply pipeline. North Dakota potatoes will soon be under the Golden Arches of McDonald's. We'll visit a grain elevator house and check out updates made since we were first there four years ago. And we profile Harvest Hope Farm's camps, which allows kids to see what farm life is like.
It's "high summer" now, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says. And that means you can expect regular heat, thunderstorms and irregular rainfall. This week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast for the next two weeks holds true to that summer pattern.
Harvest Hope Farm hosts summer camps that allow youth to experience what life is like on the farm. While it is only for a few hours a day, the little ones get to be immersed in not only the great outdoors, but agriculture as well.
This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.
The heat wave in the northern Plains won't last much beyond this weekend, but it likely will stay warm, with thunderstorms likely scattered in the region, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says on this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

BIOFUELS GROUPS ARE WELCOMING A MOVE FROM THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION THAT WILL BOOST ETHANOL USE. AGWEEK'S MICHELLE ROOK HAS MORE ON THIS IMPORTANT DECISION.

ON TUESDAY PRESIDENT BIDEN ANNOUNCED EPA WOULD BE MAKING E15 AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER USE ACROSS THE UNITED STATES, TO HELP EASE GAS PRICES.

THE PRESIDENT MADE THE ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE POET ETHANOL PLANT IN MENLO, IOWA.

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EPA, FOR THE FIRST TIME, IS ISSUING A NATIONAL EMERGENCY WAIVER ALLOWING GAS TO BE BLENDED AT A HIGHER RATE OF 15-PERCENT ETHANOL FROM JUNE 1 TO SEPTEMBER 15.

BRIAN JENNINGS WITH THE AMERICAN COALITION FOR ETHANOL SAYS THE EMERGENCY USE WAIVER COVERS 20-DAY PERIODS AND WILL BE ISSUED CLOSER TO JUNE 1.

Brian Jennings: And this is going to require EPA officials to continually monitor the fuel supply situation, the fuel price situation and we hope to continue to invoke this waiver authority so we can indeed get through the 2022 summer driving season.

JENNINGS SAYS THIS IS A SHORT TERM FIX AND MEANS THE ETHANOL INDUSTRY MUST CONTINUE TO PUSH FOR A LEGISLATIVE OR ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO MAKE YEAR-ROUND E15 PERMANENT.

THE ADMINISTRATION IS ALSO SAID TO BE CONSIDERING A YEAR-ROUND WAIVER FOR E15 ETHANOL BLENDS.

THANKS MICHELLE.

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AN EARLY SPRING STORM DROPPED MORE THAN TWO FEET OF SNOW IN PARTS OF NORTH DAKOTA.

THE HEAVY, WET SNOW CLOSED MANY ROADS, INCLUDING STRETCHES OF BOTH INTERSTATES 29 AND 94.

BUT LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS MAY HAVE HAD IT THE WORST, AS MANY ARE IN THE MIDST OF CALVING.

THESE ARE PICTURES AND VIDEO FROM FARMERS IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA. THIS ONE WAS TAKEN 15 MILES NORTH OF I-94 AT RICHARDTON. RANCHER DUSTON HUESHKE STAYED IN HIS TRUCK, TO BE NEAR HIS CATTLE THROUGH THE BLIZZARD.

YOU CAN SEE MUCH MORE AT AGWEEK.COM .

FARMERS GEARING UP FOR THE PLANTING SEASON RECENTLY GOT SOME GOOD NEWS. THE EPA HAS MADE A CHANGE TO RESTORE USE OF ENLIST AND ENLIST DUO IN 134 COUNTIES ACROSS THE U.S. FOR THE 2022 GROWING SEASON.

THE LABEL AMENDMENT WAS PROMPTED BY NEW DATA SUBMITTED TO EPA. IT LIFTS 'ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT' BANS ON THOSE HERBICIDES, IN ALL COUNTIES IN OUR REGION. SDSU'S PAUL JOHNSON SAYS THE CHANGE IS WELCOMED.

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Paul Johnson: This is a good deal to see this change back to a little bit more realistic than just a blanking off counties over a insect that may or may not be even be in them.

JOHNSON SAYS MANY FARMERS HAD ALREADY MADE THEIR PLANS FOR 2022 AND HAD BOUGHT SEED AND LINED UP HERBICIDE, SO MAKING THE SWITCH WOULD HAVE BEEN COSTLY TO GROWERS.

A PROPOSED SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANT NEAR CASSELTON, NORTH DAKOTA HAS DRAWN SOME CONTROVERSY IN THE COMMUNITY. SO THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS HELD MEETINGS THIS WEEK TO ANSWER QUESTIONS.

JEFF BEACH WAS AT ONE OF THEM, AND JOINS US NOW WITH MORE.

THE SOYBEAN PLANT IS EXPECTED TO CRUSH MORE THAN 42 MILLION BUSHELS OF SOYBEANS A YEAR.

THE PLANT IS A JOINT VENTURE BETWEEN THE MINNESOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS AND CGB ENTERPRISES OF LOUISIANA. TOGETHER, THEY OWN NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS.

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE PLANT SAY A NUMBER OF MEASURES ARE BEING PUT IN PLACE TO MAKE THE PLANT A GOOD NEIGHBOR, AND IT WILL BE A BIG ECONOMIC BOOST TO THE AREA.

Eric Kresin: WE HAVE A TRACK RECORD OF BEING GOOD NEIGHBORS AND WORKING WITH OUR COMMUNITIES, AND WE LOOK FORWARD TO WORKING WITH THIS COMMUNITY AS WE GO THROUGH THIS PROCESS.

BILL HEJL IS A RETIRED FARMER WHO SERVES ON THE CASSELTON JOB DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY. HE INITIALLY HAD SOME CONCERNS ABOUT POTENTIAL NOISE AND ODOR FROM THE PLANT, AND INCREASED TRUCK TRAFFIC. BUT HE SAYS HIS QUESTIONS WERE ANSWERED WITH A VISIT TO A SIMILAR PLANT IN BREWSTER, MINNESOTA.

Bill Hejl: I WAS FAIRLY IMPRESSED WITH HOW THERE REALLY WASN'T ANY ODOR, IT WASN'T LOUD, AND IT WASN'T CAUSING A LOT OF TRUCK TRAFFIC IN TOWN. THAT IMPRESSED ME A LOT.

A CITIZENS GROUP HAS FORMED TO EXPRESS THEIR CONCERNS ABOUT THE PLANT.

CASSELTON'S PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION WILL DECIDE ON PERMITTING LATER THIS MONTH.

THEN THE CITY COUNCIL WILL MAKE A FINAL DECISION.

THANKS JEFF.

THE RISING COST OF FARM EQUIPMENT AND PARTS, COUPLED WITH SUPPLY CHAIN PROBLEMS, HAS FARMERS DOING MORE REPAIRS.

THAT'S BEEN A BOON FOR AG EQUIPMENT RECYCLERS.

MIKKEL PATES VISITED ONE OF THE REGION'S BIGGEST, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mikkel Pates: MEYERS TRACTOR SALVAGE HAS BEEN MAKING THINGS WORK AT ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA, FOR DECADES.

Paul Meyers: I WAS JUST GOING TO BUY FARM MACHINERY FOR SCRAP, AND IT JUST EVOLVED FROM THE SCRAP BUSINESS UP.

THAT WAS IN THE MID-SEVENTIES. PAUL MEYERS WAS FARMING WITH HIS DAD, AND WORKING WITH HIS BROTHER'S AUTO SALVAGE NEXT DOOR.THEN PAUL STARTED BUYING USED TRACTORS.

Paul Meyers: WE WERE ALREADY DOING SOME MECHANICAL WORK ON THE SIDE AND IT JUST EVOLVED AND EVOLVED. IT KIND OF TOOK OFF ON ITS OWN.

BY THE EIGHTIES, PAUL HAD MOSTLY QUIT FARMING, AND WAS IN THE USED EQUIPMENT AND PARTS BUSINESS FULL TIME. TODAY HE RUNS THE COMPANY WITH HIS WIFE WENDY AND SONS JAMES AND DAVID AND ABOUT 20 EMPLOYEES.

*sounds of combine being torn apart*

THEY'VE GROWN TO BE ONE OF THE UPPER MIDWEST'S MAJOR RECYCLERS OF TRACTORS, COMBINES AND OTHER EQUIPMENT. THE INVENTORY LOT HAS GROWN TO MORE THAN 1O0 ACRES, AND SON DAVID MEYERS SEES A SOLID FUTURE AHEAD.

David Meyers: IT'S NOT GOING AWAY. THERE'S ALWAYS GOING TO BE MACHINES, MACHINES ARE ALWAYS GOING TO GET WRECKED, THEY'RE ALWAYS GOING TO GET BROKEN. AS LONG AS THE WORLD STILL NEEDS FOOD, PEOPLE ARE STILL GOING TO NEED EQUIPMENT TO GROW IT.

THE BUSINESS IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT IN THESE DAYS OF SUPPLY CHAIN PROBLEMS AND PARTS SHORTAGES.

Paul Meyers: LIKE ONE DEALER TOLD ME A WHILE BACK, WE GOT THE PARTS FOR OUR CUSTOMERS, BUT THEY'RE OUT IN THE OCEAN IN A CONTAINER RIGHT NOW. THEY MIGHT NOT GET HERE FOR ANOTHER MONTH.

*sounds of metal crunching/falling*

SIGNIFICANTLY, THE MEYERS SELL ABOUT 15,000 TONS OF SCRAP IRON EACH YEAR TO SMELTERS, MILLS AND FOUNDRIES NATIONWIDE. AND THEY SELL RECYCLED PARTS FROM TRACTORS AND COMBINES ACROSS THE COUNTRY AND BEYOND.

Paul Meyers: WE'RE JUST A BACKWARDS FACTORY.

*sound of crunching metal*

Mikkel Pates: SO AS CERTAIN FARM EQUIPMENT PART PRICES RISE OR BECOME UNAVAILABLE, THE SALVAGE BUSINESS HAS ITS DAY. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT ABERDEEN, SOUTH DAKOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

AHEAD ON OUR SHOW, TWO MINNESOTA CATTLE PRODUCERS ARE MAKING EXTRA MONEY BY SELLING THEIR HIGH QUALITY BEEF DIRECT TO CONSUMERS.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

EMILY: THIS TIME OF THE YEAR, MANY IN THE AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY ARE THINKING ABOUT THE UPCOMING PLANTING SEASON. TO TALK WITH ME MORE ABOUT THIS TOPIC IS DR. HANS KANDEL, AN NDSU EXTENSION AGRONOMIST. SO AS PRODUCERS ARE HEADING INTO THE UPCOMING PLANTING SEASON, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS THEY SHOULD TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION?

HANS: WELL THE FIRST THING OF COURSE IS THINKING ABOUT THE VARIETY THAT YOU'RE GOING TO PLANT, BECAUSE THAT IS A MAJOR DECISION. AND YOU KNOW TWO THINGS THAT FARMERS SOMETIMES NEED TO CONSIDER IF THEY HAVE AN ISSUE IS CYST NEMATODE. FARMERS NEED TO PICK A VARIETY THAT IS TOLERANT TO CYST NEMATODE. THE SECOND MAJOR ONE IS IRON CHLOROSIS TOLERANCE. THE MOST TOLERANCE IN THE FIELD THAT HAS THE HIGHEST I.D.C. NORMALLY.

AND IN TERMS OF SEEDING RATE, WHY IS THAT SUCH AN IMPORTANT THING FOR PRODUCERS TO THINK ABOUT?

Hans Kandel: IN OUR SHORT SEASON, WE NEED TO HAVE ENOUGH PLANTS IN THE FIELD TO MAXIMIZE OUR YIELD, SO BASED ON ALL THE TRIALS THAT WE HAVE DONE FOR A LONG TIME, WE NEED TO PLANT AROUND 155 THOUSAND TO 160 THOUSAND SEEDS TO GET ABOUT 150 PLANTS IN THE FIELD, AND THAT MAXIMIZES OUR YIELD. THE KEY POINT IS TO GET THOSE SEEDS EVENLY DISTRIBUTED. THAT MEANS ALSO THAT WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT THE ROW SPACING, THEY GO TOGETHER. SO IF YOU HAVE A NARROW ROW SPACING, THEN WE WILL OPTIMIZE OUR YIELDS COMPARED WITH WIDER ROW SPACING.

AND THEN ANOTHER VERY IMPORTANT THING FOR PRODUCERS TO CONSIDER IS THE ACTUAL PLANTING DATE.

Hans Kandel: IF WE CAN OPTIMIZE OUR PLANTING FROM THAT FROST DATE UNTIL THE FIRST FROST IN THE FALL, WE MAXIMIZE THE SEASON. NOW WE CAN PLANT A LITTLE BIT BEFORE THAT TYPICAL FROST DATE, BECAUSE IT TAKES ABOUT TEN DAYS BEFORE THE CROP IS OUT. SO WE HAVE FOUND THAT YOU CAN GAIN ABOUT A THIRD OF A BUSHEL PER DAY, THAT YOU CAN PLANT EARLIER IN THAT IDEAL TIME FRAME IN MAY. SO EVERY DAY THAT YOU DELAY IN MAY YOU LOSE ABOUT A THIRD OF A BUSHEL, SO IT'S VERY CRITICAL THAT YOU TRY TO PLANT AS EARLY AS YOU CAN.

EMILY: DR. HANS KANDEL, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR INSIGHT TODAY.

MORE AND MORE FARMERS AND RANCHERS ARE DIVERSIFYING THEIR OPERATIONS, TO INCREASE CASH FLOW.

I VISITED FOUR HILL FARMS IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA, WHERE THEY INCORPORATED A VITAL ADDITION TO THEIR FARM ABOUT A DECADE AGO.

Jake Thompson: FARMING IS LIFE, IT'S A WAY OF LIFE, NOT JUST AN OCCUPATION.

JAKE THOMPSON AND HIS BROTHER NATHAN ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT FARMING, AND RAISING CATTLE.

"come here buddy"

THEY OPERATE FOUR HILL FARMS NEAR BARNESVILLE, MINNESOTA. THEY FARM ABOUT 2500 ACRES, AND THEY CALVE OUT ABOUT 200 COW-CALF PAIRS, AS PART OF THEIR REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BUSINESS.

You're not going to do very well out there, bud,

TO SUPPLEMENT THEIR INCOME, THEY SELL THE MEAT FROM ABOUT FIFTY ANIMALS A YEAR FROM THEIR FREEZER TRAILER. MEAT SUPPLY ISSUES DURING COVID HELPED BOOST THEIR BUSINESS.

Jake Thompson: WELL WE'VE PROBABLY BEEN DOING THAT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS. WITH COVID THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS IT'S REALLY TAKEN OFF AGAIN, SO WE'VE REALLY KIND OF FOCUSED MORE IN ON IT. I THINK IT'S BECOME VERY IMPORTANT BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE MORE AWARE NOW, THEY REALLY LIKE TO KNOW WHERE THEIR MEAT IS COMING FROM.

JAKE SAYS THEY'VE ALSO DEVELOPED A NETWORK OF BUTCHERS TO HELP THEM MEET DEMAND FOR THEIR BEEF. HE SAYS THE DIVERSIFICATION HELPS THEM HANG ON AS PRICES RISE AND FALL.

Jake Thompson: A LOT OF BEEF PRODUCERS IN THE STATE OF MINNESOTA, THE MAJORITY OF THEM HAVE A JOB TO SUPPLEMENT INCOME TO THEIR JOB. WHY NOT DIVERSIFY WITHIN THE BUSINESS ITSELF?

JAKE THOMPSON IS ALSO VICE PRESIDENT OF THE MINNESOTA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION.

COMING UP, WE'LL TELL YOU ABOUT A PRODUCT THAT BRINGS SALINE SOILS BACK TO PRODUCTIVITY.

WINTER STORMS PLAGUED THE REGION THIS WEEK. BUT HOW LONG CAN WE EXPECT THESE WINTERY CONDITIONS TO LINGER?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

SALINE CAN LEAVE PARTS OF A FIELD UNPRODUCTIVE, BUT NOW THERE'S A SOLUTION TO HELP BRING THOSE AREAS BACK TO LIFE.

AN ARIZONA-BASED COMPANY IS TAKING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR GOLF COURSES, AND USING IT TO TAKE SALTS OUT OF THE SOIL. ROSE DUNN HAS MORE ON HOW A PRODUCT CALLED 'CALCINE' IMPROVES THE SOIL, AND HELPS IT TO GROW CROPS AGAIN.

TOO MUCH CALCIUM LEAVES SOILS UNPRODUCTIVE, AND COSTS GROWERS MONEY. LAND CAN BECOME TOO SALINE FROM TOO WET OR DRY CONDITIONS, IRRIGATION, OR A NUMBER OF OTHER FACTORS. BUT A PRODUCT CALLED CALCINE CAN HELP SOLVE THAT.

Jim Erickson: WE SAW CALCINE BEGIN TO WORK IN DRIER AREAS, WE'VE BEEN IN REAL WET AREAS IN THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS TOO.

JIM ERICKSON, OF ERICKSON CUSTOM OPERATIONS, BROUGHT CALCINE TO THIS AREA ABOUT SIX YEARS AGO. IT ALLOWS THE CALCIUMS AND THE SOIL PROPERTIES TO DELINEATE THE SALTS OUT OF THE SOIL.

Jim Erickson: RELEASING THE NATURAL NUTRIENTS AND GETTING THE CROPS TO COME BACK TO LIFE, AND GETTING THE SOIL, FIRST OF ALL, TO COME BACK TO LIFE.

GARY WAGNER FARMS IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA. HIS SOIL VARIES FROM HEAVY CLAY TO SANDY SOIL, AND HE'S NOTICED THE SALTS HAVE GOTTEN WORSE OVER THE PAST TEN YEARS.

Gary Wagner: OUR EXPERIENCE IS NORMALLY ALONG ROADSIDES, WHETHER IT BE PUTTING SALT ON HIGHWAYS AND GETTING ON THE FIELDS. SATELLITE IMAGERY, WE LOOKED AT IT AND YOU CAN SEE EXACTLY WHERE THE CALCINE WAS, WE HAD MORE GROWTH IN THOSE AREAS. WE'RE BECOMING A BELIEVER.

CALCINE NOT ONLY BRINGS SALINE OR SODIC SOILS BACK TO LIFE, ERICKSON SAYS THEY'RE SEEING GROWERS SAVE MONEY IN THE FACE OF RISING INPUT COSTS, ESPECIALLY FERTILIZER.

Jim Erickson: CALCINE WAS DESIGNED TO OPEN UP THAT GROUND, AND IN THAT PROCESS OF OPENING UP THE GROUND, WE'RE ALSO LEARNING WHAT IT'S DOING TO RELEASE THE NATURAL NUTRIENTS THAT ARE IN THE SOILS, WHETHER IT'S NITROGEN, POTASSIUM.

AN ADDED BENEFIT IS THAT CALCINE WARMS THE GROUND, SO GROWERS CAN GET IN THE FIELD FASTER

Jim Erickson: YOU CAN PUT IT ON ANY TIME. WE HAVE PRODUCERS RIGHT NOW OUT ON FROZEN GROUND THAT ARE OUT SPRAYING IT BECAUSE IT WILL GO DOWN ON THE GROUND AND BE THERE AND BE READY FOR THEM WHEN THEY GO OUT TO PLANT. WE'VE SEEN GERMINATION TAKE PLACE QUICKER AS WELL BECAUSE IT DOES WARM UP THE GROUND.

THAT CAN INCREASE YIELDS. AND YOU CAN APPLY IT THROUGHOUT THE SEASON.

Jim Erickson: FARMERS ARE PUTTING IT DOWN IN ROW WITH THEIR STARTER FERTILIZER, WHETHER IT'S BEANS OR CORN OR WHATEVER. IF IT'S WHEAT OR SMALL GRAINS THAT ARE GOING DOWN, THEY CAN GO OUT AND DO SPRAY APPLICATIONS WITH THE CALCINE ON TOP OF THE SOIL THROUGH THEIR POST OR PRE-EMERGE APPLICATIONS COMBINED.

ERICKSON WARNS CALCINE IS NOT AN OVERNIGHT MIRACLE. IT'S A THREE TO FIVE YEAR RECLAMATION PROCESS. BUT HE SAYS GROWERS CAN START TO SEE A RETURN ON INVESTMENT IN THEIR FIRST CROP YEAR, NOT TO MENTION A SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN THE VALUE OF RESTORING UNPRODUCTIVE LAND.

Jim Erickson: WE WANT YOU TO SEE THIS WORK.THIS ISN'T ABOUT SPENDING MONEY, IT'S ABOUT INVESTING SOME MONEY TO SEE WHAT YOU CAN GET TO COME BACK AGAIN.

THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW CALCINE WORKS, CONTACT JIM ERICKSON AT E.C.O. AT THE NUMBER OR EMAIL ON YOUR SCREEN.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL TRAVEL TO SOUTHERN MINNESOTA, TO LEARN THE SECRET TO BETTER SYRUP.

A FARM IN SOUTHERN MINNESOTA IS BUSY WITH AN UNUSUAL CROP THIS TIME OF YEAR. FOR JUST A COUPLE OF WEEKS IN THE SPRING, THE JIRIK FAMILY IS BUSY PRODUCING THEIR PURE, ORGANIC MAPLE SYRUP.

Jim Jirik: THE MAPLE SYRUP IS LIKE DRINKING SUNSHINE.

JIM JIRIK SAYS MORE SUN LAST SUMMER MEANS A HIGHER SUGAR CONTENT IN THE SAP NOW. HE SAYS LOTS OF SUN IS JUST ONE OF THE INGREDIENTS THAT MAKES THEIR MAPLE SYRUP SPECIAL. THE SECRET MAY BE IN THE HUNDRED-YEAR-OLD MAPLE TREES, THE RICH SOIL, OR THEIR PROCESS. THEY'RE ONE OF THE FEW WHO COOK IT AT HIGH HEAT OVER A WOOD FIRE. AND HE'S PROUD OF THE SYRUP THEY PRODUCE.

Jim Jirik: WE FEEL THAT OUR SYRUP HAS A DIFFERENT, UNIQUE TASTE TO IT. WE FEEL THERE'S SOME CARAMELIZATION THAT'S TAKING PLACE WITH THE SUGARS SO THAT GIVES IT A UNIQUE TASTE, AND WE'RE ACTUALLY MARKETING OUR SYRUP THAT IT'S DONE WITH A WOOD FIRED EVAPORATOR.

SYRUP ISN'T ALL THEY DO. JIRIK FAMILY FARMS PRODUCES CERTIFIED ORGANIC GRAIN, PASTURE RAISED FINISHED BEEF, RAW HONEY AND A VARIETY OF VEGETABLES. BUT TIME IN THE WOODS COLLECTING SAP TO MAKE HIGH QUALITY SYRUP MAY BE JIRIK'S FAVORITE PART OF FARMING. YOU CAN EVEN GO SEE IT BEING MADE, AND TASTE SYRUP FRESH FROM THE MACHINE.

Jim Jirik: I'VE TASTED A LOT OF SYRUP, AND A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE TRIED OURS, AND THEY ALL COMMENT THAT THIS IS THE BEST SYRUP THAT THEY'VE EVER HAD. YOU KNOW, AND IT MAKES US FEEL GOOD.

JIRIK FAMILY FARMS CAN BE FOUND AT FARMERS MARKETS THROUGHOUT MINNESOTA, AND IT'S AVAILABLE IN SOME STORES AROUND THE REGION.

THANKS FOR WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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