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AgweekTV Full Show: Starter flock, harvest outlook, corn drying, regenerative flax, sugarbeet harvest

This week on AgweekTV, we'll visit a pair of brothers turned shepherds through a starter flock program. USDA reduces corn and soybean harvest estimated from last month. We'll take a look at the corn drying outlook this harvest season. The foodie market catches up to regenerative principles. And we finish up one of our follow a farmer series with sugarbeet harvest.

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This week on AgweekTV, we'll visit a pair of brothers turned shepherds through a starter flock program. USDA reduces corn and soybean harvest estimated from last month. We'll take a look at the corn drying outlook this harvest season. The foodie market catches up to regenerative principles. And we finish up one of our follow a farmer series with sugarbeet harvest.

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StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says that after the first significant winter storm of the season, winter has arrived, with snow and cold sticking around. But at least right now, Thanksgiving looks likely to be dry.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

U.S. SOYBEAN AND CORN HARVESTS WILL BE SMALLER THAN LAST MONTH'S FORECAST, ACCORDING TO THE OCTOBER USDA CROP PRODUCTION REPORT.

THIS WEEK, SOYBEAN PRODUCTION WAS PEGGED AT 4.313 BILLION BUSHELS. WITH AVERAGE YIELDS OF 49.8. THAT'S DOWN SEVEN TENTHS OF A BUSHEL FROM LAST MONTH'S FORECAST.

CORN PRODUCTION IN NOW EXPECTED TO BE 13.895 BILLION BUSHELS, WITH AN AVERAGE YIELD OF 171.8 BUSHELS AN ACRE. THAT'S ALSO DOWN ABOUT A HALF BUSHEL FROM LAST MONTH'S USDA'S ESTIMATES.

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THESE LOWER EXPECTATIONS MAY INCREASE CONCERNS ABOUT TIGHT SUPPLIES, AS GLOBAL GRAIN INVENTORIES ARE NEAR THEIR LOWEST IN A DECADE.

THERE'S GROWING INTEREST IN SUSTAINABILITY. AND NOW AG POWERHOUSE ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND IS JOINING THE MOVEMENT. A NORTH DAKOTA FARMER IS AMONG A HANDFUL OF GROWERS IN THE DAKOTAS TO GROW FLAXSEED ``REGENERATIVELY" FOR ADM. MIKKEL PATES EXPLAINS WHAT THAT MEANS IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

*sound of harvesting*

Paul Overby: WE CHOSE TO GIVE UP OUR SUIT AND TIE CAREERS AND MOVE NORTH TO DAKOTA AND STARTED FARMING.

PAUL AND DIANE OVERBY TOOK OVER HIS FAMILY'S FARM NEAR WOLFORD, NORTH DAKOTA WHEN HIS DAD RETIRED IN 1993.

Paul Overby: WE JUST STARTED FARMING THE WAY DAD HAD BEEN FARMING.

THAT MEANT USING TRADITIONAL PRACTICES LIKE CHISEL PLOWING, CULTIVATING AND DISKING. BUT BY THE EARLY 2000S THEY WERE TRYING NO TILL FARMING, COVER CROPS, AND REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE. DIANE OVERBY ADMITS AT FIRST SHE WAS SKEPTICAL.

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Diane Overby: THE FIRST TIME HE DID NO-TILL I THOUGHT HE WAS A LUNATIC.

BUT OVER TIME SHE BECAME A BELIEVER.

Diane Overby: AND WE KEPT GETTING A CROP AND WE KEPT IMPROVING OUR YIELD A LITTLE BIT, AND I THOUGHT WELL MAYBE THERE'S SOMETHING TO THIS.

RECENTLY, THOSE REGENERATIVE PRACTICES LINED UP WITH SOME NEW PRIORITIES FOR ADM. THE OVERBYS ARE GROWING FLAX FOR THE AG GIANT'S NEW "NOBLE GROWN" PILOT PROGRAM. ADM PAYS A PREMIUM FOR FLAX GROWN IN ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY WAYS, TO BE SOLD FOR SPECIALTY FOOD PRODUCT MARKETS.

Jaime Goehner: IT MEANS PARTNERING WITH PEOPLE THAT HAVE A PLANET CONSCIOUS FOCUS, A PEOPLE CENTERED FOCUS AND A PURPOSE DRIVEN FOCUS. AND DEVELOP A PURPOSE-DRIVEN BRAND THAT IMPROVES THE OVERALL HEALTH OF OUR PLANET.

OVERBY SAYS HE'S HAPPY ABOUT THE PREMIUM, BUT HE'S EVEN MORE EXCITED THAT ONE OF AMERICA'S MAJOR AG PLAYERS IS CONNECTING CONSUMERS WITH BUILDING SOIL HEALTH.

Paul Overby: MY MAIN MOTIVATION IS THIS CONNECTION BETWEEN FOOD THAT FARMERS RAISE AND THE CONSUMERS THAT BUY IT, AND BRINGING THOSE TWO THINGS TOGETHER. AND THEY WANT TO KNOW THAT IT WAS RAISED IN AN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY WAY THAT'S BUILDING SOIL, SO THAT THEIR CHILDREN AND THEIR GRANDCHILDREN CAN ALSO GET FOOD OFF OF THESE SAME ACRES.

Mikkel Pates: WHILE THIS STYLE OF FARMING MAY BE RELATIVELY NEW, THESE REGENERATIVE FARMERS ARE HOPING THEIR FLAX PRODUCTION WILL BE GOOD FOR THEMSELVES, FOR THE CONSUMERS, AND THE ENVIRONMENT. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT WOLFORD, NORTH DAKOTA.

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*sound of harvesting*

YOU CAN READ MORE ON THIS IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, AND AT AGWEEK.COM .

LILY BERGMAN IS CALLING HER FIRST HARVEST SEASON AS A FULL-TIME FARMER A GOOD ONE.

SHE'S ONE OF THE FARMERS WE'VE BEEN FOLLOWING THIS SEASON. BERGMAN IS 23 YEARS OLD, AND GRADUATED FROM NDSU IN THE SPRING. SHE FARMED PART-TIME WITH HER DAD IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA FOR SEVERAL YEARS WHILE SHE WAS IN SCHOOL. NOW, THEY HAVE SEPARATE FARMING OPERATIONS BUT WORK TOGETHER TO RAISE WHEAT, PINTO BEANS, SOYBEANS AND SUGARBEETS. BERGMAN SAYS DESPITE THE COOL, WET WEATHER THAT DELAYED PLANTING, HER FIRST SEASON WENT WELL.

Lily: YEAH, I'VE ENJOYED IT. YUP, IT STILL HASN'T EVEN REALLY HIT ME THAT I HAVEN'T GONE BACK TO SCHOOL. I FEEL LIKE SUMMER JUST HASN'T ENDED YET. I DON'T KNOW WHEN THAT WILL KICK IN BUT IT'S BEEN GOOD. I'M GLAD THIS IS WHERE I'M AT.

LILY SAYS THEY HAD ALMOST IDEAL CONDITIONS ALL SUMMER AND SHE'S PLEASED WITH THE YIELDS. AND NOW, THEY COULD USE SOME RAIN.

Lily Bergman: WE'RE PRETTY DRY, WHICH IT'S HARD TO COMPLAIN ABOUT THAT DURING HARVEST, BUT YEAH, GETTING SOME RAIN MAYBE RIGHT BEFORE FREEZE UP OR A GOOD SNOW ACCUMULATION THIS WINTER WOULD BE ALL RIGHT.

LILY TOLD US SHE'S ALREADY EXCITED FOR NEXT SPRING'S PLANTING.

WITH A CHALLENGING PLANTING SEASON, CORN IN THE REGION IS IN A VARIETY OF GROWING STAGES, WITH MOISTURE CONTENT ALL OVER THE BOARD.

KEN HELL-A-VANG, NDSU EXTENSION AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER, SAYS HE'S HEARING REPORTS OF ANYWHERE FORM THIRTEEN PERCENT MOISTURE TO THE MID-TWENTIES, AND THE WINDOW FOR FIELD DRYING CORN IS QUICKLY CLOSING.

Ken Hellevang: One of the things people need to keep in mind this year is that the first part of October has been very warm, been great for drying. You look at the next couple weeks and we're gonna get back to more normal temperatures, so the amount of field drying that's going to be occurring is going to become less and less. Again, as we get into November, the drying ability of that air is pretty much gone.

HELLEVANG ADVISES FARMERS WEAR AN N-95 MASK WHEN WORKING IN A DUSTY GRAIN ENVIRONMENT TO AVOID RESPIRATORY ISSUES.

GRAZING MANAGEMENT IS AN IMPORTANT TOPIC FOR RANCHERS TO KEEP IN MIND AS THE REGION HEADS INTO FALL.

IN THE FALL, COOL SEASON GRASSES ARE PRODUCING THEIR TILLERS, WHICH ARE USED TO HELP THE GRASS GROW NEXT SPRING.

IF THE PASTURES AREN'T MANAGED, TILLERS CAN BE GRAZED PAST THEIR GROWING POINT. IF THAT HAPPENS, THEY COULD DIE AND THE PLANT HAS TO GROW A NEW TILLER THE FOLLOWING SPRING. DRY CONDITIONS CAN ALSO IMPACT TILLER GROWTH.

Miranda Meehan: Another factor that influences tiller growth is drought status, so that is another thing that can cause those tillers to die, is drought stress. Though we have favorable conditions this spring, right now 72% of the state is in some level of drought. So it's comparable to the fall of 2020.

NDSU EXTENSION OFFERS A GRAZING MEASUREMENT STICK RANCHERS CAN USE IN THEIR GRASSES TO MAKE SURE THEY'RE NOT OVERGRAZED.

SOUTH DAKOTA SENATOR MIKE ROUNDS HAS INTRODUCED LEGISLATION TO REFORM THE USDA'S NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE FOR FARMERS, RANCHERS AND LANDOWNERS.

NRCS IS THE AGENCY IN CHARGE OF MAKING WETLAND DETERMINATIONS. THE PROPOSAL IS IN RESPONSE TO FRUSTRATION FROM LANDOWNERS OVER PERMANENT EASEMENTS FOR WETLANDS.

AMONG OTHER THINGS, ROUNDS' LEGISLATION WOULD REFORM THE NRCS APPEALS PROCESS. ROUNDS SAYS INSTEAD OF PERMANENT EASEMENTS, HE'D LIKE TO PUT A TIME LIMIT ON THEM, SO LANDOWNERS HAVE SOME LEVERAGE FOR NEGOTIATIONS.

Sen. Mike Rounds: And what we've seen and have had folks come in and just frustrated as all heck, how about the attitude of the enforcement officers coming back in and saying, time after time, we're going to tell you how you're going to run your operation and what you can do and what you can't do.

CO-SPONSORS OF THE BILL INCLUDE NORTH DAKOTA SENATORS JOHN HOEVEN AND KEVIN CRAMER.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, A NEW PROGRAM IS BRINGING MORE SHEEP TO THE REGION.

THE REGION'S LIVESTOCK IS DOMINATED BY CATTLE, BUT NDSU EXTENSION AND THE NORTH DAKOTA LAMB AND WOOL PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION ARE LOOKING TO EVEN THE PLAYING FIELD. I VISITED A PAIR OF BROTHERS IN MEDINA, NORTH DAKOTA WHO GOT SHEEP THROUGH A STARTER FLOCK PROGRAM FOR KIDS UNDER EIGHTEEN.

Josh Moser: It was a really good way of starting off to have sheep.

*sound of sheep eating corn*

JOSH MOSER WAS A 2022 STARTER FLOCK RECIPIENT. HE TRAVELED TO HETTINGER RESEARCH CENTER TO PICK UP HIS 10 RAMBOUILLET EWES THAT CAME FROM WYOMING. WHILE THIS WAS HIS FIRST TIME RECEIVING HIS OWN SHEEP THROUGH THE PROGRAM, HE'S NO STRANGER TO IT. HIS BROTHER, JARED, WAS A STARTER FLOCK RECIPIENT LAST YEAR.

Jared Moser: I had a few friends who were in the sheep industry and the last year, it's been two years ago I guess since we got into it. The sheep market was pretty high and it seemed pretty good, it was something to make money off of.

THE BROTHERS NOW HAVE A FLOCK OF 28 RAMBOUILLET EWES WHICH THEY BREED TO THEIR COUSIN'S RAM. THE PAIR LAMB OUT THEIR FLOCK AND SELL SOME OF THEIR OFFSPRING THROUGH PRIVATE TREATY. THEY BOTH AGREE THEIR FLOCK WOULDN'T BE WHAT IT IS TODAY WITHOUT THE PROGRAM.

Travis Hoffman: So the foundation of our North Dakota Lamb and Wool producers Starter Flock is truthfully getting young people involved and inspired in our industry. And so first thing is that we are able to provide that chance with repayment back of 70% of the value of those animals over a three year period.

THE RECIPIENTS ARE GIVEN MENTORS TO HELP THEM WITH ANY QUESTIONS AND ISSUES THEY MAY HAVE WITH THEIR FLOCK. THEY'RE ALSO ABLE TO TAKE CLASSES OFFERED THROUGH THE PROGRAM.

Josh Moser: I say it's a really good opportunity for a young person to be able to get started at a pretty cheap price at this market and you really learn a lot in all the classes you take with them and they're always open for questions if you ever need to talk to them. So it's a pretty easy learning process and it's a great program to go through.

TEN KIDS GOT SHEEP FROM THE STARTER FLOCK PROGRAM THIS YEAR.

AN AGRIBUSINESS IN HAITI WITH STRONG TIES TO NORTH DAKOTA IS FACING SOME MAJOR CHALLENGES.

JOHN DRAXTON, ORIGINALLY FROM NORTHWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA, STARTED FARMER JOHN'S HAITI ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO. THE MEAT PROCESSING COMPANY PROVIDES SUSTAINABLE, SANITARY MEAT --AND JOBS-- TO THE STRUGGLING COUNTRY.

BUT RECENT POLITICAL UPHEAVAL, GANG VIOLENCE, AND FUEL SHORTAGES AND PRICE SPIKES ARE PUSHING FARMER JOHN'S TO MOVE TO SOLAR POWER.

IN A RECENT YOU TUBE VIDEO, DRAXTON SAID THE BUSINESS HAS GROWN TO THIRTY EMPLOYEES, AND BUYS ANIMALS FROM 200 FARMERS. IT'S A HUGE BOON TO THE ECONOMY, BUT DRAXTON SAYS THEY ARE ON THE VERGE OF CLOSING IF THEY CAN'T CONVERT TO RELIABLE SOLAR POWER.

John Draxton: WE NEED 24 HOUR POWER WITH OUR OWN GENERATORS. AS YOU CAN SEE, I HAVE ONE, TWO, THREE, I HAVE FOUR GENERATORS TO TRY TO KEEP RUNNING.

THE SOLAR PROJECT WILL COST 300 THOUSAND DOLLARS, AND THEY'VE RAISED 200 THOUSAND SO FAR. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SOLAR PROJECT, AND HOW TO DONATE, GO TO THE WEBSITE ON YOUR SCREEN.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WHY IT'S IMPORTANT FOR SOYBEAN GROWERS TO KEEP UP WITH SOIL TESTING.

IT'S CERTAINLY STARTING TO FEEL LIKE FALL. IS THAT WEATHER HERE TO STAY?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

WHAT FARMERS DO ONE YEAR CAN HAVE IMPLICATIONS ON THEIR OPERATION IN FUTURE YEARS. THAT'S WHY WE'RE TALKING THE IMPORTANCE OF SOIL SAMPLING, IN THIS MONTH'S SOY INSIGHT.

JOINING ME NOW IS NDSU SOIL SPECIALIST, DAVE FRANZEN. AND WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT SOIL TESTING TODAY. AND A LOT OF SOYBEAN GROWERS MIGHT NOT EVEN REALIZE HOW IMPORTANT THAT IS.

DAVE: WELL, THEY DO SOME SOME TEST AFTER SOYBEANS, BUT THEY DON'T REALLY TEST BEFORE SOYBEANS. ONE OF THE MAIN REASONS THAT PEOPLE SOIL SOIL SAMPLE IN NORTH DAKOTA FOR NITRATE AND SO THEY THINK, WELL, WHY DO THEY HAVE TO DO THAT FOR SOYBEANS? BUT IN THE EASTERN PART OF THE STATE WHERE IRON DEFICIENCY CHLOROSIS IS REALLY BAD. IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUR NITRATE VALUES ARE BEFORE YOU PUT THE CROP IN.

THIS YEAR WE HAVE ALL KINDS OF PREVENT PLANT ACRES THAT MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE COVER CROPS ON THEM, AND THEY PROBABLY HAVE SOME NITRATE BUILD UP UNDERNEATH THEM, ESPECIALLY ONES THAT DON'T HAVE COVER CROPS. AND THE HIGHER THE NITRATE IS, THE MORE PROBLEMS WITH IDC THEY'RE GOING TO HAVE. THE OTHER NUTRIENTS ARE IMPORTANT IF YOU'RE SAMPLING BEFORE SOYBEANS OR THE PHOSPHATE THE PHOSPHATE LEVELS AND ALSO SOIL PH PEOPLE DON'T THINK TOO MUCH ABOUT P.H., AT LEAST THEY HAVEN'T IN THE PAST.

BUT SOYBEANS ARE GROWN ALL OVER NORTH DAKOTA NOW, AND ESPECIALLY WEST RIVER, BUT NOT COMPLETELY WEST RIVER. THERE ARE A LOT OF REALLY LOW ACID AREAS.

ROSE: AND HOW IMPORTANT IS THE DEPTH OF SAMPLING?

DAVE: WELL, THE DEPTH IS PRETTY, PRETTY IMPORTANT IF IF YOU SOIL SAMPLE IN ZONE AND YOU FIND OUT THE P-H'S ARE WELL ABOVE FIVE, THEN THEN YOU REALLY DON'T HAVE TO GO ANY TO ANY MORE DETAIL. BUT LET'S JUST SAY THAT YOU'RE A LONG TERM NO TILL FARMER. YOU TAKE A YOU HAVE YOUR SOIL SAMPLES IN THE LARGE PART OF THE FIELD HAS P-H'S MAYBE DOWN 5.1, 5.2, SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WHICH ARE PRETTY ACID. AND THEN THE NEXT STEP IS TO TRY TO FIND OUT WHERE THAT STRATIFICATION IS. ALSO, IF YOU'RE CHECKING FOR NITRATE, THE TWO FOOT SAMPLE IS NECESSARY.

ROSE: WITH THE CURRENT HIGH FERTILIZER PRICES, SOMETHING YOU DON'T WANT TO DO IS OVERLOOK THE SOIL TESTING.

DAVE: WELL, THAT'S ABSOLUTELY RIGHT. THE FERTILIZER PRICES CONTINUE TO BE HIGH. SO IT'S A MAJOR INPUT COST. MORE THAN CASH RENT IN MOST, MOST PLACES. SO NOT SOIL TESTING, JUST BLINDLY PUTTING ON FERTILIZER WHERE YOU MAY NOT NEED IT DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE TO ME. SO SOIL TESTING IS VERY CHEAP COMPARED TO THE PRICE OF FERTILIZER AND EVERYBODY SHOULD BE DOING IT.

ROSE: LOTS OF VERY IMPORTANT INFORMATION. THANKS A LOT. NDSU SOIL SPECIALIST DAVE FRANZEN.

FOR MORE RESEARCH AND INFORMATION ON SOIL SAMPLING AND TESTING, CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE ON YOUR SCREEN.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL SEE HOW ONE COMMUNITY IS MAKING MORE OPPORTUNITIES FOR SMALL PRODUCE GROWERS...

THE GROWING NUMBER OF FARMERS MARKETS IN THE ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA AREA IS GIVING VENDORS NEW OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE MONEY.

THE YANG FAMILY HAS BEEN SELLING THEIR PRODUCE AT THE ROCHESTER FARMERS MARKET FOR MORE THAN TEN YEARS. BUT TWO NEW MARKETS WERE ADDED IN 2021, SO THEY'RE ABLE TO SELL MORE, AND NOT HAVE AS MUCH LEFTOVER WASTE. NOU YANG AND HER SISTER, EMILY, RUN THEIR PRODUCE BUSINESS WITH THEIR PARENTS, WHO CAME TO THE U.S. FROM LAOS IN THE LATE '70S.

NOU SAYS HAVING THE TWO EXTRA FARMERS MARKETS EACH WEEK IS HARD WORK, BUT ALSO A LOT OF FUN.

Nou Yang:WE LOVE GETTING OUT THERE, GETTING TO KNOW OTHER VENDORS OUT THERE, SOCIALIZING WITH PEOPLE. SO WITH THAT BEING SAID, JUST COMING OUT TO THE VILLAGE AS WELL WHEN WE HEARD ABOUT IT. JUST GETTING TO KNOW A DIFFERENT GROUP OF VENDORS OUT HERE AS WELL. IT'S WHAT WE ENJOY DOING, IS SOCIALIZING.

THE VILLAGE AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE IS ONE OF THE NEW MARKETS IN ROCHESTER. IT WORKS WITH MORE THAN 200 FAMILIES, TO FARM ON ELEVEN ACRES.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

THE SUPREME COURT MAY BE SEEKING A NEW TEST FOR DETERMINING WHEN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HAS JURISDICTION OVER A WATERWAY.

AND THE MINNESOTA SOYBEAN RESEARCH AND PROMOTION COUNCIL JUST OPENED A NEW ROUND OF REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS ON RESEARCH PROJECTS THAT COUNCIL WILL HELP FUND IN 2023.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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