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AgweekTV Full Show: Sidney Sugars, National FFA Week, Agweek Livestock Tour, Nancy Jo Bateman

This week on AgweekTV, Sidney Sugars will close its doors. We kick off National FFA Week. We continue the Agweek Livestock Tour. And we visit Nancy Jo Bateman about joining the the ag hall of fame.

This week on AgweekTV, sugarbeets are big in the Red River Valley, but a beet factory in Montana is closing its doors. We're gonna kick off National FFA Week by visiting the North Valley CTC in Grafton, North Dakota. On the Agweek Livestock Tour, we'll visit a North Dakota ranch that's moved its bull sale to an online, timed auction. A fourth generation dairy in southeast Minnesota is going strong after more than three quarters of a century. And a longtime North Dakota beef industry exec finds out she's "hall of fame" material.

See more from AgweekTV
Meteorologist John Wheeler shares that the spring planting outlook is likely to be pressed back further with continued cold weather.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll also take a closer look at Case IH and New Holland Sign Right to Repair Memorandum, farm bill listening session, Sugarbeet Institute update, Soy Insight, sugar and sodium reduced in School Lunch
The coldest air appears to be on the way out, but it's still not going to be a quick warm up, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says. Snow also looks like to be lighter for the northern Plains.
This week on AgweekTV, we're coming to you from the Agweek Farm Show in Rochester. We also talk ag education teacher shortages and a new technology to help boost your yields.
AgweekTV's Emily Beal visits with Mychal Wilmes at the Agweek Farm Show about his background, his history in agriculture and with the annual farm show and how he writes his popular column.
Colder than normal temperatures and an active-weather pattern look to continue across the northern Plains for the next two weeks, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says on AgweekTV.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV. I'M

EMILY

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BEAL.

THE GROWTH OF THE BEEF INDUSTRY

OVER THE LAST 40-50 YEARS IS

NOTHING SHORT OF AMAZING. AND

IT'S BEEN LED BY RANCHERS, AND

HALL OF FAME WORTHY INDIVIDUALS,

LIKE NANCY JO BATEMAN.

BATEMAN WAS THE EMCEE FOR THIS

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WEEK'S NORTH DAKOTA LIVESTOCK

ALLIANCE SUMMIT. SHE RECENTLY

RETIRED AFTER A 38-YEAR CAREER

AS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE

NORTH DAKOTA BEEF COMMISSION. A

BIG PART OF HER JOB WAS

PROMOTING BEEF AND WORKING WITH

THE BEEF CHECKOFF. SHE WAS A

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PART OF THE VERY SUCCESSFUL

"BEEF. IT'S WHATS' FOR

DINNER"

CAMPAIGN, AND HELPED PROMOTE THE

STORY OF THE BEEF BELT....NORTH

DAKOTA TO TEXAS...WHERE

60-PERCENT OF THE NATION'S

CATTLE COME FROM.

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NANCY: I THINK OUR BEEF INDUSTRY HAS

EVOLVED AMAZINGLY AND HAS

ANSWERED THAT CHALLENGE TODAY.

BACK IN THE LATE EIGHTIES, WE

HAD, BY USDA DEFINITIONS AND

RESEARCH, SIX CUTS OF BEEF THAT

WE COULD CALL LEAN. OKAY. TODAY

WE'VE GOT CLOSE TO 40. AND

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THAT

HAS HAPPENED BECAUSE PRODUCERS

HAVE LOOKED AT THEIR GENETICS

AND THEY HAVE BRED CATTLE TO BE,

YOU KNOW, HIGH QUALITY, YOU

KNOW, CHOICE CATTLE, BUT ALSO

LESS EXTERNAL FAT.

BATEMAN, ALONG WITH RANCHER

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JERRY DOAN, WILL BE INDUCTED

INTO THE THE NORTH DAKOTA

AGRICULTURAL HALL OF FAME ON

MARCH 8TH.

IN 2016, DOAN'S BLACK LEG

RANCH

WAS HONORED WITH THE NATIONAL

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD

FROM THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S

BEEF ASSOCIATION.

SUGARBEET GROWERS ARE MAKING

THEIR VOICES HEARD IN THE 2023

FARM BILL.

MORE THAN TWO HUNDRED FIFTY FROM

AROUND THE NATION ATTENDED THE

RECENT AMERICAN SUGARBEET

GROWERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL

MEETING IN WASHINGTON DC.

NATE HULTGREN, ASGA BOARD

PRESIDENT AND A RAYMOND,

MINNESOTA, FARMER SAYS IT'S

IMPORTANT THAT THIS FARM BILL

DOESN'T TAKE ANYTHING AWAY

FROM

THE SUGAR PROGRAM ALREADY IN

PLACE. ANOTHER IMPORTANT STEP IS

TO PROVIDE MORE STABILITY MOVING

FORWARD AND ASKING FOR

RE-INVESTMENTS INTO THE

INDUSTRY, AS THE YOUNGEST

FACTORY IN AMERICA IS NOW 50

YEARS OLD. AMERICA HAS SEEN 24

SUGAR FACTORIES CLOSE DUE TO

INSTABILITY AND LACK OF PROFITS

OVER THE PAST 40 YEARS.

NATE: WE'RE ALWAYS GETTING

PRESSURED TO DO MORE THINGS

SUSTAINABLY WHICH ON OUR FARMS

WE'VE ALWAYS FELT WE'VE

DONE. ON

THE FACTORY IF THOSE THINGS

REQUIRE ENVIRONMENTAL OR ENERGY

CHANGES, WE'D BE ASKING OUR

GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE DOLLARS TO

DO THOSE CHANGES.

HULTGREN SAYS HE'S CONFIDENT

THE

USDA UNDERSTANDS THE STRUGGLES

THE SUGAR INDUSTRY IS CURRENTLY

FACING.

THE LATEST EXAMPLE OF THOSE

STRUGGLES? AMERICAN CRYSTAL

SUGAR WILL NO LONGER CONTRACT

WITH GROWERS WHO RAISE THE CROP

FOR SIDNEY SUGARS INC. IN

MONTANA, AND PLANS TO BEGIN

SHUTTERING THE FACTORY IN APRIL.

STEVE ROSENAU, AMERICAN CRYSTAL

VICE PRESIDENT, DECLINED TO

ANSWER AGWEEK'S QUESTIONS

ABOUT

THE CLOSURE, BUT SAID IN A NEWS

RELEASE "DUE TO AN ONGOING

INSUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF

SUGARBEETS FROM THE LOCAL

GROWERS, IT'S BECOME

FINANCIALLY

UNSUSTAINABLE TO CONTINUE

OPERATING THE NEARLY100-YEAR-OLD

BUSINESS."

THE MINNESOTA FERTILIZER FEE

COULD GO UP TWENTY FIVE CENTS ON

EVERY TON OF FERTILIZER SOLD, AS

PART OF THE BUDGET REQUEST FROM

GOVERNOR TIM WALZ.

SOME FARMERS ARE WONDERING WHY

THE FEE IS NEEDED WHEN MINNESOTA

IS PROJECTED TO HAVE A BUDGET

SURPLUS OF 17.6 BILLION DOLLARS,

ESPECIALLY WHEN FERTILIZER

PRICES ARE ALREADY VOLATILE.

IN A BUDGET PRESENTATION TO THE

MINNESOTA HOUSE COMMITTEE ON AG

FINANCE AND POLICY, MINNESOTA

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STAFF

SAID THE FEE INCREASE WILL

GENERATE ABOUT $750,000 A YEAR

TO GO INTO A FUND DEDICATED TO

INSPECTING AND PERMITTING

FERTILIZER STORAGE SITES. THE

CURRENT FEE IN MINNESOTA IS 39

CENTS PER TON, COLLECTED BY THE

RETAILER.

NATIONAL FFA WEEK IS LATER THIS

MONTH. KATIE PINKE TAKES US TO

GRAFTON, NORTH DAKOTA, TO GET A

LOOK AT HOW NORTH VALLEY CAREER

AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER IS GROWING

FFA. IT'S OUR AGWEEK COVER

STORY.

ON A MISSION TO GROW THE

TRADITION THAT'S THE MOTTO IN

MOLLY ZAHRADKA'S CLASSROOM AT

THE NORTH VALLEY CAREER AND

TECHNOLOGY CENTER IN GRAFTON,

NORTH DAKOTA WHERE TODAY THEY

ARE PREPARING TO INCUBATE CHICKS

FOR FFA WEEK..

BUT MOLLY WASN'T ALWAYS

INVOLVED

IN FFA OR AG EDUCATION AT ALL

WHEN SHE STARTED COLLEGE FOR AG

BUSINESS AT NORTH DAKOTA STATE

UNIVERSITY, SHE REALIZED THERE

WAS SOMETHING DIFFERENT ABOUT

MANY OF HER CLASSMATES.

"THEY WERE COMING FROM ALL OVER

THE STATE AND THEY ALREADY KNEW

EACH OTHER THROUGH FFA, AND I

WAS JEALOUS OF THAT- BOTH THE

KNOWLEDGE AND THE OPPORTUNITIES

THAT THEY GOT THAT WERE NOT

NECESSARILY AFFORDED TO ME AS A

HIGH SCHOOLER.

GIVEN THAT SHE HAD GROWN UP IN

AG AND HAD WORKED IN AN

AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM, SHE SAID

THE SWITCH TO AG EDUCATION WAS

EASY FOR HER NOW, ZAHRADKA IS

ONE OF FOUR AGRICULTURE TEACHERS

AT THE NORTH VALLEY CTC.

"I STRATEGICALLY PICK CONTENT

THAT'S GOING TO APPLY TO THEM

WITHOUT HAVING TO BE A FARMER.

ONE OF THOSE STUDENTS HOWEVER,

DOES PLAN ON FARMING AND WILL BE

THE 6TH GENERATION FARMER WHEN

HE IS RUNNING IT.

FARMING IS IN MY BLOOD

BASICALLY IT STARTED WHEN I WAS

A LITTLE KID.

THE CTC OFFERS OTHER PROGRAMS

ALONG WITH AGRICULTURE EDUCATION

THAT CAN SET STUDENTS UP FOR

FULFILLING CAREERS WITHOUT THE

TIME AND EXPENSE OF A FOUR-YEAR

DEGREE, EXPLAINS CTC DIRECTOR

MIKE HANSON.

THAT'S KIND OF THE GOAL IS TO

MAKE SURE ALL THESE RURAL KIDS

HAVE THE SAME OPPORTUNITIES AS A

KID IN FARGO OR WAHPETON OR ANY

OF OUR LARGER DISTRICTS WE HAVE

PROGRAMS THAT WOULD NOT BE

AVAILABLE IN ST. THOMAS, FOR

EXAMPLE, WITHOUT HAVING AN AREA

CENTER AND HAVING ALL THE KIDS

BUILD THEIR ENROLLMENT.

A LOT OF TIMES THEY DON'T

THINK

ABOUT ALL OF THE STUFF BEFORE

AND AFTER THE PRODUCTION PART OF

AGRICULTURE I THINK SHOWING

THEM ALL OF THE DIFFERENT STEPS

AND KIND OF EXPOSING THEM TO A

BUNCH OF DIFFERENT INDUSTRIES

WILL HOPEFULLY HELP FILL THAT

VOID.

GREEN ALSO KNOWS THAT HE'S

GETTING MORE THAN JUST FARMING

KNOWLEDGE OUT OF HIS EXPERIENCE

IN THE CTC

I LEARNED HOW TO RUN A MEETING,

HOW TO TALK IN FRONT OF OTHERS,

HOW TO JUST BE A BETTER

LEADERSHIP PERSON

WITH THE SUCCESS OF THE PROGRAM

NORTH VALLEY IS ACTIVELY

SEARCHING FOR A FIFTH AG TEACHER

TO ADD TO THE CAVALIER SATELLITE

CENTER. AND STUDENTS LIKE GREEN

ARE ALWAYS LOOKING TO ADD TO

THEIR FFA TEAM.

DON'T BE WORRIED ABOUT WHAT

OTHER PEOPLE WILL THINK. JUST

TRY IT

WHAT AG AND FFA HAS TO OFFER

OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM IS REALLY

WHERE I CAN SEE KIDS DERIVING

MOST OF THE BENEFIT FROM

THERE WAS A WHOLE NOTHER PIECE

OF THESE KIDS THAT THEY CAN FIND

THEIR NICHE IN WHEN THEY GO TO

FFA.

IN GRAFTON, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS

IS KATIE PINKE FOR AGWEEK.

FOR MORE ON THIS STORY, CHECK

OUT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR

AGWEEK.COM . NATIONAL FFA WEEK

BEGINS FEBRUARY 18TH.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV...

WE'LL VIST A NORTH DAKOTA

RANCH

THAT'S TAKING IT'S

PRODUCTION

SALE ONLINE...

THE AGWEEK LIVESTOCK TOUR IS

SPONSORED BY FARMERS MUTUAL OF

NEBRASKA, 701X AUTONOMOUS

RANCHER, AND STOCKMAN'S

LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

THIS WEEK OUR AGWEEK LIVESTOCK

TOUR TAKES US TO WESTERN NORTH

DAKOTA, WHERE WE VISIT A RANCH

THAT'S TAKING A NEW APPROACH

TO

THEIR ANNUAL SALE. JENNY

SCHLECHT HAS MORE FROM

RICHARDTON...

KENNY: WE KIND OF TRY TO RAISE

AN ALL AROUND PRODUCT WITH OUR

RED ANGUS

JENNY STANDUP: FORSTER RED ANGUS

RANCH HAS BEEN IN THE RED ANGUS

BUSINESS FOR OVER 55 YEARS. BUT

THIS YEAR, THEY'RE TRYING

SOMETHING DIFFERENT...AN ALL

ONLINE SALE.

KENNY: WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE

MORE CONVENIENT FOR THE BUYER

AND US, ACTUALLY, AS THE SELLER.

WE DON'T HAVE TO HAUL THE

BULLS

TO A SALE BARN AND BACK, BECAUSE

WE TEND TO INJURE SOME OF THEM

DOING THAT.

JENNY: UNPREDICTABLE WINTER

WEATHER ALSO PLAYED A FACTOR IN

GOING ONLINE FOR THE\R

AUCTION.

BUT FORSTER RED ANGUS HAS A LONG

HISTORY OF BEING WILLING TO

CHANGE. IN 2004, THEY MOVED TO A

LATE CALVING DATE, AFTER A TOUGH

SEASON HAD EVERY CALF GOING INTO

A WARMER BOX.

KENNY: WE HAVE WAY

LESS CALVING

ISSUES, HEALTHIER

CALVES JUST

FROM BEING OUT ON

THE

PASTURE...BASICALLY COME

FALL

TIME IT'S SURVIVAL OF THE

FITTEST, WHO COMES IN, IN THE

FALL. AND WE BELIEVE THAT'LL

GIVE A LOT TOUGHER, LONGER

LASTING BREEDING BULL FOR OUR

CLIENTS.

JENNY: FORSTER SAYS

REACTION TO

MOVING HIS SALE ONLINE HAS BEEN

WAY BETTER THAN EXPECTED, WITH

MANY CUSTOMERS EXCITED ABOUT THE

FLEXIBILITY IT OFFERS. THE

ONLINE SALE WILL RUN FOR SIX

DAYS, STARTING FEBRUARY 14TH.

ALL 85 COMING 2-YEAR OLD BULL

LOTS WILL CLOSE ON THE FINAL

DAY.

KENNY: AND SO THEY'LL BE ABLE

TO PICK THEIR TIME, WHERE IT WORKS

IN THEIR SCHEDULE, TO COME AND

LOOK AT THE BULLS. AND THEN THEY

CAN GO BACK HOME AND PLACE A BID

ON THEM.

JENNY STANDUP: SALE DAY CAN BE

STRESSFUL FOR BOTH BUYERS AND

SELLERS. FORSTER RED ANGUS IS

HOPING THAT'S ITS NEW ONLINE,

TIMED AUCTION WILL BE A WIN WIN

FOR BOTH SIDES.

JENNY: IN RICHARDTON, NORTH

DAKOTA, THIS IS JENNY SCHLECHT

FOR AGWEEK.

OUR LIVESTOCK TOUR CONTINUES IN

SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA, IN THE

ROCHESTER AREA. KEVIN BORST, HIS

BROTHER, DAD AND UNCLE ARE ALL A

PART OF BORST FAMILY DAIRY,

WHICH HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE

1946. THEY MILK AROUND 230

HOLSTEINS AND ALSO HAVE A SMALL

FEEDLOT WHERE THEY FINISH

STEERS. THEY ALSO UTILIZE

ROBOTIC TECHNOLOGY, TO MAKES

THINGS EASIER.

KEVIN: WE HAVE A ROBOTIC FEED

PUSHER THAT PUSHES UP FEED. SO

THAT'S BEEN GOOD FOR THE COWS

BECAUSE OVERNIGHT, NOBODY'S

FROM

8PM TO 4 IN THE MORNING. THEN

THE ROBOT WILL PUSH UP FEED

EVERY HOUR SO IT'S ALWAYS

CLOSE

AND EASY FOR THEM TO GET AT.

BORST DAIRY ALSO BREEDS SOME OF

THEIR HOLSTEINS TO WAYGU. THEY THEN SELL QUARTERS,

HALVES AND CUTS DIRECTLY TO

CONSUMERS, AND HAVE GOTTEN GOOD

FEEDBACK ON THE TENDERNESS AND

MARBLING OF THE MEAT.

BEING AN ORGANIC OPERATION

DOESN'T ONLY MEAN DIFFERENT

PRACTICES WHEN RAISING CROPS AND

PLANTS. THERE ARE ALSO

CHALLENGES WHEN IT COMES TO

RAISING LIVESTOCK ORGANICALLY.

JILL SALMEN SPOKE ON THE TOPIC AT A RECENT

SUSTAINABLE AG CONFERENCE IN

FARGO. SALMEN AND HER HUSBAND MILK ABOUT 100

COWS ON AN ORGANIC DAIRY IN

MINNESOTA. THAT MEANS NO

ANTIBIOTICS OR MANY TREATMENTS

OTHER LIVESTOCK OPERATIONS WOULD

USE. SO SHE SAYS PREVENTION IS

OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE.

JILL: THE BIGGEST THING AS FAR

AS TREATING DISEASE AND ILLNESS

IS PREVENTION...SO INSTEAD OF

JUST BEING ABLE TO GIVE A SHOT,

THERE'S A LITTLE MORE EFFORT

ON

MY PART. SO PREVENTING IT SAVES

ME A LOT OF TIME, A LOT OF

HEADACHES, AND MAYBE EVEN A FEW

BRUISES (LAUGHS)

SALMEN SAYS OTHER BASICS OF PREVENTION

INCLUDE HIGH QUALITY FEED,

CLEANLINESS AND USING COMMON

SENSE.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV...

I SIT DOWN WITH THE NEW DIRECTOR

OF NDSU'S CENTER FOR AG POLICY

AND TRADE...

AGRIWEATHER OUTLOOK AGRIWEATHER

AGRIWEATHER OUTLOOK SPONSORED BY

EXCALIA FUNGICIDE FROM VALENT

U.S.A.

HOW LONG CAN THE REGION EXPECT

THIS WARMER WEATHER TO LAST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR

AGRI-

WEATHER OUTLOOK.

EMILY: AG POLICY AND

INTERNATIONAL MARKETS ARE ALWAYS

AN IMPORTANT TOPIC TO COVER.

JOINING ME NOW TO DISCUSS THOSE

IS SANDRO STEINBACH, DIRECTOR OF

THE CENTER OF AG POLICY AND

TRADE STUDIES AT NDSU. SO,

SANDRO, TELL ME ABOUT YOUR NEW

ROLE WITHIN NDSU.

SANDRO: AT THE CENTER FOR

AGRICULTURE POLICY AND TRADE

STUDIES. I'M RESPONSIBLE FOR

RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE

AREA OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE AS

WELL AS A POLICY AS IN FARM

BUSINESS ACTIVITIES AND

INTERESTS. ROLE. I'M WORKING

TOGETHER WITH COMMODITY BOARDS

AS WELL AS FARMERS AND

PRODUCERS, AS WELL AS RANCHERS

IN THE NORTHERN GREAT GREAT

PLAINS TO RESOLVE AND WORK ON

ISSUES RELATED TO AG POLICY AND

TRADE.

EMILY: SO WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO

ACCOMPLISH DURING YOUR TIME AT

THE CENTER?

SANDRO: THE CENTER HADN'T BEEN

OPERATING FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS,

ACTUALLY. SO NOW IT'S A STAGE

ACTUALLY FOR US TO REVAMP THE

CENTER AND THINK ABOUT WHAT ARE

THE PRIORITIES ACTUALLY ARE,

PARTICULARLY AS IT COMES TO

NORTH DAKOTA. SO I'M ENGAGING

RIGHT NOW WITH DIFFERENT

STAKEHOLDERS, COMMODITY BOARDS

IN NORTH DAKOTA AND INDUSTRY

PARTNERS TO SEE WHAT IS A VISION

THAT THEY WANT US TO JOINTLY

IMPLEMENT, BECAUSE I THINK IT'S

IMPORTANT TO ACTUALLY ENGAGE

WITH STAKEHOLDERS AND CAREFULLY

DEFINE WHAT ARE THE PRIORITIES

OVER THE NEXT 5 TO 10 YEARS.

WHAT I ENVISION TO CENTER MYSELF

TO BE ACTUALLY, I WANT TO

PROVIDE SOUND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

ACTUALLY TO DIFFERENT

STAKEHOLDERS IN THE STATE WHEN

THEY WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT

QUESTIONS RELATED, FOR INSTANCE,

HOW IMPORTANT THE AG INDUSTRY

ACTUALLY IS, HOW WE UNDERSTAND

CHANGES TO FEDERAL, BUT ALSO

STATE POLICIES AND THE

IMPLICATIONS OF THOSE CHANGES,

ACTUALLY. AND THE GOAL HERE IS

OBVIOUSLY IS THAT WE HAVE THE

CENTER CONTRIBUTE TO TO A BETTER

UNDERSTANDING OF HOW POLICIES

ARE FUNCTIONING AND THEREBY

CONTRIBUTE TO INCREASING FARM

INCOMES ACTUALLY IN THE STATE.

EMILY: SANDRO STEINBACH, THANK

YOU FOR YOUR INSIGHT TODAY.

STILL AHEAD ON OUR SHOW...

WE'LL VISIT WITH THE LITTLE

"I" QUEEN, AS NDSU'S SADDLE AND

SIRLOIN CLUB HAS IT'S BIG

LIVESTOCK SHOW THIS WEEKEND.

NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY'S

SADDLE AND SIRLOIN CLUB IS

HOSTING ITS 97TH LITTLE

INTERNATIONAL THIS WEEKEND.

LITTLE I GIVES STUDENTS A CHANCE

TO PARTICIPATE IN SHOWMANSHIP

CLASSES WITH A VARIETY OF

ANIMALS. THIS YEAR'S LITTLE I

QUEEN IS KYLIE HILDRE. HILDRE

GREW UP ON A RANCH IN VELVA,

NORTH DAKOTA AND IS A SENIOR

STUDYING NURSING. HILDRE HAS

BEEN AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE

SADDLE IN SIRLOIN CLUB SINCE HER

FRESHMAN YEAR AND ALWAYS KNEW

SHE WANTED TO RUN FOR LITTLE I

QUEEN.

KYLIE: IT WAS SOMETHING THAT I KNEW I

COULD REALLY SHOW A PASSION FOR

AS WELL AS KEEPING THE YOUNGER

KIDS INVOLVED AND REALLY JUST

HELPING EVERYBODY BE THE BEST

THAT THEY CAN BE.

THIS IS THE FIRST YEAR THAT

LITTLE I WILL HAVE A CLASS OF

GOATS AS PART OF THEIR SHOW.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON

AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK

MAGAZINE THIS WEEK.

A MINNESOTA GENERAL STORE'S

NEW LIFE IS AN EXAMPLE OF PEOPLE

MOVING INTO RURAL AREAS.

AND...THE COURTS WANT THE

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

TO DO A BETTER JOB ON MATTERS

RELATED TO THE ENDANGERED

SPECIES ACT.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING

AGWEEK TV. REMEMBER TO CHECK US

OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER,

INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK,

TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS.

HAVE A WONDERFUL WEEK

EVERYONE...

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