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AgweekTV Full Show: Rural rescue program, help for farm families, avian influenza, Cows and Co. Creamery

This week on AgweekTV, we look at a strong rural rescue program, and an unusual rescue kit. A community comes together to help farm families during their time of need. New cases of avian influenza continue to be reported in the region. And we'll visit a North Dakota dairy that gives its customers a taste of the Netherlands.

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This week on AgweekTV, we look at a strong rural rescue program, and an unusual rescue kit. A community comes together to help farm families during their time of need. New cases of avian influenza continue to be reported in the region. And we'll visit a North Dakota dairy that gives its customers a taste of the Netherlands.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

NEIGHBORS CAME TOGETHER TO HARVEST THE CROP OF TWO MEN WHO DIED IN LATE AUGUST, IN WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY WAS A TRIPLE MURDER-SUICIDE. DOUGLAS DULMAGE, JUSTIN BRACKEN, AND RICHARD BRACKEN, ALL FROM LEEDS, NORTH DAKOTA AND ROBERT BRACKEN, OF CANDO, NORTH DAKOTA, DIED IN A FIELD WEST OF MAZA, NORTH DAKOTA.

DESPITE THE LOSS, NEIGHBORS ARE COMING TOGETHER TO FINISH THAT HARVEST.

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Brian Engstrom: I GUESS DOUG AND I, AND THE NEIGHBORHOOD, WE'RE ALL GREAT FRIENDS. NO MATTER WHAT, WE WANT TO COME TOGETHER AND HELP EACH OTHER.

BRIAN ENGSTROM HAS KNOWN DOUG DULMAGE SINCE CHILDHOOD, IN FACT, THEIR FAMILIES GO BACK A CENTURY.

Brian Engstrom: IT ISN'T JUST THAT DOUG AND I AND OUR GENERATION ARE FAMILY AND FRIENDS, WE'VE BEEN THAT WAY FOR GENERATIONS.

SO WHEN ENGSTROM HEARD THAT HELP WAS NEEDED FOR DULMAGE'S AND JUSTIN BRACKEN'S HARVEST, HE KNEW THE COMMUNITY WOULD WANT TO HELP FINISH.

Brian Engstrom: EVERYBODY'S TAKING THEIR TURN. THERE'LL BE SOYBEANS LATER, THERE'S GOING TO BE CORN, THERE'S FLAX TO DO. I KNOW THAT EVERYBODY THAT HAS TIME IS GOING TO DO THEIR PART.

Tyler Sears: THIS IS JUST WHAT YOU DO.

WHEN TYLER SEARS, HIS BROTHER AND DAD HEARD ABOUT THE TRAGEDY, THEY KNEW THEY NEEDED TO HELP, TOO.

Tyler Sears: ANYTIME YOU SEE SOMETHING LIKE THIS HAPPEN, YOU, I DON'T KNOW, IT'S NOT EVEN A QUESTION FOR ME ANYWAY, BECAUSE I'M A HELPER. ANY FARMER WOULD, YOU KNOW, COME AND HELP BECAUSE THIS KIND OF TRAGEDY, IT'S JUST LIKE AN AUTOMATIC THING, THAT YOU GO HELP IF HELP IS NEEDED

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LANNY MOORE MANAGES BRIAN EGSTROM'S FARM, NEAR DULMAGE'S. HE SAYS DULMAGE WAS KNOWN ACROSS THE STATE, AS HE WAS ACTIVE IN THE NORTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU, AND WAS A POPULAR SEED DEALER.

Lanny Moore HE WAS A PIONEER SEED SALESMAN FOR THE AREA, AND EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. REALLY A PERSONABLE INDIVIDUAL. I'VE HAD INTERACTIONS WITH DOUG ALL TWELVE YEARS THAT I'VE WORKED HERE WITH BRIAN, AND I DON'T KNOW THAT YOU COULD ASK FOR A NICER GUY.

AND THE FRIENDS SAY, THEY'LL KEEP COMING BACK UNTIL THE LAST FIELD IS HARVESTED.

Brian Engstrom: I DON'T THINK THERE WILL BE ANY TROUBLE FINDING PEOPLE TO HELP. PROBABLY MORE PEOPLE WILLING TO HELP THAN THERE ARE THINGS TO DO AT TIMES.

JUSTIN BRACKEN'S FIANCE PAIGE DYKSTRA, WHO IS EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD TOGETHER, SAYS SHE HASN'T BEEN ABLE TO THINK ABOUT LIFE WITHOUT HIM. BUT SHE SAYS SHE'S GRATEFUL FOR THE COMMUNITY'S HELP AND SUPPORT.

Paige Dykstra: I MEAN, YOU LOOK OUT INTO THE FIELD AND YOU SEE THE COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER, COMBINING THE WHEAT FOR DOUG AND JUSTIN. YOU KNOW, YOU CAN'T THANK THEM ENOUGH FOR THE HELP THAT THEY'VE PROVIDED, AND WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE.

THE TOWNER COUNTY SHERIFF ISN'T YET RELEASING THE EXACT CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE DEATHS.

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THE FALL BIRD MIGRATION IS UNDERWAY, AND NEW CASES OF AVIAN FLU ARE BEING REPORTED. SO THE POULTRY INDUSTRY NEEDS TO PROTECT AGAINST DEVASTATING LOSSES.

VETERINARIAN SHAUNA VOSS, WITH THE MINNESOTA BOARD OF ANIMAL HEALTH, SAYS THE RETURN OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA IN AUGUST WAS A LITTLE SOONER THAN EXPECTED. THE STATE SAW SOME CASES IN MAY. VOSS SAYS NOW, THEY'RE ALSO SEEING IT IN THE WILD BIRD POPULATION, WHICH MIGHT MAKE IT HARDER TO CONTROL. SHE SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT TO BE VIGILANT ABOUT BIOSECURITY MEASURES.

Dr. Shauna Voss: EVEN THOUGH IT'S EARLIER THAN WE HAD ANTICIPATED, NOW IS THE TIME TO START REVIEWING THOSE BIOSECURITY PLANS, MAKING SURE THAT EVERYBODY'S FOLLOWING THOSE PLANS.

MINNESOTA HAS A HOTLINE TO REPORT SICK BIRDS, OR ANSWER QUESTIONS. IT'S ON YOUR SCREEN, AS IS THE NUMBER FOR AFTER HOURS OR WEEKENDS.

A NORTH DAKOTA CREAMERY IS BRINGING A TASTE OF EUROPE TO THE PRAIRIE. I VISITED COWS AND CO. CREAMERY IN CARRINGTON, AND GOT A TASTE OF THE NETHERLANDS. IT'S THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Maartje: So we're originally from the Netherlands.

MAARTJE MURPHY AND HER FAMILY MOVED TO CANADA FROM THE NETHERLANDS WHEN SHE WAS SEVEN YEARS OLD. HER PARENTS WERE DAIRY FARMERS WHO WANTED TO GROW THEIR OPERATION, BUT IT WAS HARD TO EXPAND THEIR FARM IN EUROPE.

Conny: We relocated because we saw that Europe was going to be difficult with all the regulations.

AFTER SPENDING EIGHT YEARS IN ALBERTA, CANADA, CONNY VAN BEDAF AND HER HUSBAND CORNE MOVED THEIR THREE CHILDREN ONE FINAL TIME TO CARRINGTON, NORTH DAKOTA. VAN BEDAF SAYS SHE ALWAYS HAD CHEESE MAKING IN THE BACK OF HER MIND, BUT NEVER PURSUED IT. HER DAUGHTER HAD ALSO WANTED TO MAKE GELATO AND BECOME A CHEESE MAKER. SO THE PAIR WENT TO GELATO UNIVERSITY IN ITALY.

Maartje: We went for a week and fell in love with the gelato making process, so we came back and thought how can we make this possible?

THEY TRANSFORMED THEIR GARAGE INTO A GELATO MAKING FACILITY. BUT MURPHY WANTED TO EXPAND. SHE AND HER HUSBAND CASEY BOUGHT A HOMESTEAD IN CARRINGTON A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO, AND NOW THEY MAKE THEIR PRODUCTS RIGHT ON THE FARM.

Casey: It's a really fun, unique on farm experience where we like to bring the consumer in to share our slice of heaven with them.

COWS AND CO. USES THE MILK FROM THEIR DAIRY FARM FOR THEIR PRODUCTS, WHICH THEY THINK GIVES THEM AN EDGE. THEY HOUSE 15-HUNDRED DAIRY COWS AND SEND THE MILK THEY DON'T USE TO CASS-CLAY CREAMERY IN FARGO.

Conny: The quality of our milk was the number one priority at our farm

COWS AND CO. CREAMERY SELLS GELATO, GOUDA AND FRESH CHEDDAR CHEESE CURDS. MURPHY WANTED TO INCORPORATE A EUROPEAN EXPERIENCE INTO COWS AND CO, SO THEY BUILT AN ON-FARM CAFE, WHERE CUSTOMERS CAN SIT AND ENJOY THEIR PRODUCTS. ON-FARM CAFES ARE COMMON IN THE NETHERLANDS.

Maartje: Our main goal is for people to come to cows and co. and feel like they are in the Netherlands or in a country in Europe and sit on our patio and enjoy farm fresh products.

music up briefly.

MURPHY EARNED A SPOT ON THE FORBES 30 UNDER 30 LIST FOR HER GELATO. YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV...

THE AGTEGRA COOPERATIVE DOES REGULAR GRAIN BIN RESCUE TRAINING, AND UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA MEDICAL STUDENTS GET A FIRST HAND LOOK.

THE FARM CAN BE A VERY DANGEROUS PLACE. SO THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA MEDICAL SCHOOL AND AGTEGRA, A MAJOR GRAIN AND AGRONOMY COOPERATIVE IN THE DAKOTAS, ARE TEAMING UP TO PROVIDE TRAINING AND EQUIP PEOPLE IN HEALTH EMERGENCIES. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE ON THIS LIFE-SAVING PROGRAM.

Cody Bonn: WE'VE DONE A FAIR AMOUNT OF GRAIN BIN RESCUES...

CODY BONN LEADS THE CO-OP'S TECHNICAL RESCUE TEAM AND SAYS THERE'S OFTEN LITTLE TIME, AND TOO MUCH DISTANCE. IT'S GOOD TO KEEP THE TEAM SHARP AND TO SHARE THEIR KNOWLEDGE WITH THE FUTURE DOCTORS WHO WILL TEND TO RESCUED VICTIMS.

Cody Bonn: WE'RE DOING IT TO PREPARE OURSELVES FOR ANY SORT OF EMERGENCY THAT WE WOULD RESPOND TO AT AGTEGRA OR OUR SURROUNDING AREA.

Dr. Matthew P. Owens: I THINK THE WHOLE AG SECTOR'S GOING TO BENEFIT FROM THIS.

DOCTOR MATTHEW OWENS IS A RURAL PHYSICIAN AND A TRAINING PARTNER IN THE NEW DAKOTA RESPONDER PROGRAM THAT GIVES A THREE-HOUR TRAINING FOR IMMEDIATE TRAUMA CARE. HE'S SEEN THE NUMBER OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL PROVIDERS DROP DURING HIS MEDICAL CAREER IN SOUTH DAKOTA. HE HOPES PROGRAMS LIKE THIS ONE -- TRAINING AGTEGRA EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS, REGIONWIDE -- WILL HELP SAVE LIVES.

Dr. Matthew P. Owens: YOU KNOW FARMERS THINK ABOUT IT, WHAT IF I'M OUT IN A FIELD AND I HAVE A BAD LACERATION, OR I GET PULLED INTO A PIECE OF EQUIPMENT. AND SO WE'RE ALLOWING FOR THIS SORT OF TRAINING, SO AT LEAST THERE'S SOME EARLY INTERVENTION, REALLY IMPROVES OUTCOME.

OWENS ALSO TEACHES DISASTER TRAINING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA MEDICAL SCHOOL. HE BROUGHT SEVERAL USD MEDICAL STUDENTS DESIRING RURAL CAREERS, TO THE AGTEGRA RESCUE TRAINING.

WE USED OXYGEN IN OUR LAST GRAIN BIN ENGULFMENT.

Hannah Trierweiler: IT GIVES US AN IDEA OF WHAT'S GOING ON OUT HERE AND HOW THEY GET THE PATIENT TO US.

MIKKEL: AGTEGRA AND THE USD MEDICAL SCHOOL ARE ALSO INVOLVED IN GETTING A SPECIAL RESCUE KIT INTO THE COUNTRY.

THIS IS WHAT'S CALLED A 'DITCH KIT.' IT'S GOT PRETTY MUCH EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE FIELD.

Conrad Mohr-Eymer: WHEN ACCIDENTS OR THINGS LIKE THIS HAPPEN, EVERYBODY'S KIND OF, WHAT DO WE DO? SO IT'S NICE TO HAVE TRAINING LIKE THIS.

SO A CO-OP AND A MED SCHOOL HOPE THEIR EFFORTS WILL MAKE FARMERS, AND RURAL RESIDENTS, SAFER. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT WARNER, SOUTH DAKOTA.

AGTEGRA IS PAYING EMPLOYEES ACROSS SOUTH DAKOTA TO TAKE THE TRAINING COURSE.

IT'S SEPTEMBER, AND OUR FOLLOW-A-FARMER SERIES IS NEARING THE END OF ANOTHER GROWING SEASON.

VANCE JOHNSON IS ONE OF THE FARMERS WE'VE BEEN FOLLOWING SINCE THIS SPRING. HE GROWS CORN, SOYBEANS, WHEAT AND SUGARBEETS NEAR BRECKENRIDGE, MINNESOTA. THE POOR SPRING WEATHER MEANT HIS WHEAT CROP WENT IN THE LATEST HE'S EVER PLANTED, BUT IT CAME OFF IN AUGUST, AND PRODUCED ABOUT 45 TO 50 BUSHELS AN ACRE OF GOOD QUALITY WHEAT.

NOW, HE SAYS HE'D LIKE TO SEE THE WARM WEATHER CONTINUE FOR HIS CORN AND SOYBEANS.

Vance Johnson: SOME OF THE SOYBEANS ARE JUST STARTING TO TURN HERE IT LOOKS NOW THIS WEEK, SO I'D SAY THEY'RE ON PAR FOR END OF THE MONTH HARVEST, END OF SEPTEMBER, SO WE'LL SEE. AND THE CORN LOOKS TO BE END OF SEPTEMBER, WE COULD PROBABLY GET MATURITY, WE JUST NEED SEPTEMBER TO BEHAVE FOR US.

BUT A BIG PROBLEM NOW IS HE'S STARTING TO SEE WATER HEMP IN HIS SUGARBEET CROP, AS THE LACK OF MOISTURE PREVENTED HIS PRE-EMERGE HERBICIDE FROM ACTIVATING, AND IT'S TOO LATE TO TRY SOMETHING ELSE.

FIVE FARMS IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA ARE INVOLVED IN A LAND STEWARDSHIP PROJECT RESEARCH PROJECT GEARED TO HELP FARMERS UNDERSTAND AND USE CUTTING-EDGE COMPOSTING SYSTEMS TO BUILD SOIL HEALTH NATURALLY. WE VISITED ONE NEAR LEWISTON, MINNESOTA.

Dale Pangrac: WE HAVE A DAIRY OPERATION HERE. WE'RE ORGANIC, WE MILK 150 COWS AND FARM 750 ACRES.

DALE PANGRAC AND HIS WIFE CARMENE WERE SCIENCE TEACHERS, BEFORE THEY BOUGHT THIS FARM IN 1979 AND SWITCHED CAREERS. BUT THAT INTEREST IN SCIENCE CONTINUES TO SERVE THEM ON THE FARM. LIKE LEARNING HOW TO DEVELOP BIODIVERSE COMPOST. THEY SAY IT HAS CUT DOWN ON THE AMOUNT OF FERTILIZER THEY HAVE TO BUY AND APPLY.

Dale Pangrac: WE'RE TRYING TO GET AWAY FROM THAT. WE'RE TRYING TO USE THE COMPOST AND LET THE SOIL BIOLOGY DO THE WORK NOW, INSTEAD OF SPOON FEEDING EVERYTHING. ALTHOUGH WE STILL DO BUY FERTILIZER, WE'RE NOT THERE YET. IT'S A PROCESS AND IT TAKES TIME.

THE PANGRAC'S IS ONE OF FIVE FARMS PARTICIPATING IN A COMPOSTING RESEARCH PROJECT LED BY THE LAND STEWARDSHIP PROJECT. IT'S DESIGNED TO HELP FARMERS USE CUTTING-EDGE COMPOSTING SYSTEMS, LIKE THE JOHNSON-SU BIOREACTOR SYSTEM. THE CREATORS WERE THERE TO DEMONSTRATE. AND ONE BENEFIT OF THIS SYSTEM IS IT'S LOW MAINTENANCE.

Hui-Chun Su Johnson: ONCE YOU BUILD IT, YOU JUST CHECK ON IT EVERY SO OFTEN, AND THEN A YEAR LATER YOU HAVE THIS BEAUTIFUL COMPOST THAT LOOKS LIKE A DECADENT CHOCOLATE CAKE.

David Johnson: THAT ONE BIOREACTOR CAN DO 350 ACRES OF LAND, AND THE IMPACT THAT IT HAS ON THE ABILITY TO GROW A PLANT IS SIGNIFICANT.

IN FACT, JOHNSON SAYS HE'S SEEN GROWERS DOUBLE THEIR OUTPUT. SHONNA LANGSETH, THE CO-DIRECTOR OF THE LAND STEWARDSHIP PROJECT, SAYS THEIR MAIN GOAL IS TO HELP FARMERS LOWER THEIR DEPENDANCE ON FERTILIZER, AND REDUCE INPUT COSTS.

Shona Langseth: THIS IS A WAY OF THEM BUILDING THEIR OWN FERTILITY IN THE SOIL AND REALLY BEING RELIANT UPON THEMSELVES TO DO THAT. AND SAVING MONEY REALLY. THAT'S WHAT IT COMES DOWN TO. MAKING SURE OUR FARMS ARE VIABLE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

THE PROJECT IS FUNDED BY THE MINNESOTA AG DEPARTMENT.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, IT'S HARD TO GET INTO THE FARMING BUSINESS, BUT WE'LL MEET A TEENAGER WHO'S DETERMINED TO DO IT.

COULD THE REGION BE IN FOR CHILLIER TEMPS?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

DYLAN BAKKEN MAY ONLY BE 17, BUT HE'S SPENT YEARS ON WILKIN COUNTY, MINNESOTA FARMS, WORKING THE FIELDS FOR OTHERS. NOW, HE HOPES IT'S HIS TIME TO FARM.

Just days away from starting his senior year in high school, Dylan Bakken heads out on this John Deere 4230 to cut a third crop of alfalfa. Another farmer is letting Dylan use this tractor as he heads out to cut hay in a field he doesn't own. But don't worry. Dylan already has a lifetime of experience farming.

Right when I was born, basically, I knew I wanted to farm.

Since he was a toddler.

Dylan Bakken: One of my neighbors actually like a mile north of me, he has a farm, and I'd go out there after school. I'd have to really beg my parents to let me get out there in the tractor with him.

Dylan has been dreaming of being a farmer. HIs grandpa did it. And for the last several years, Dylan has been working for many local farmers while going to junior high and high school. And Lately,

I bought an 8-row planter last winter, that's a John Deere. I go all green.

Dylan has been buying up his own equipment.

I started when I was, I'd say 13, saving up from working with my neighbors and whatnot, and moving snow up in Fargo.

A tractor, planter and this combine. No farmland yet. But he's hoping.

Dylan Bakken: I can't put any money towards land right now because I am so young, so I figured put it towards equipment and go from there.

People have told Bakken he is crazy to think he can start farming on his own, but he's driven and won't give up until he has land to call his own. He's hoping someone out there hears his story and are willing to work with him in helping this all become a reality.

Dylan Bakken: It was always a dream. I like seeing the crop grow from nothing, and all your hard work come up to something in the fall.

DYLAN GOES TO SCHOOL IN BRECKENRIDGE, MINNESOTA.

STILL AHEAD, SHE MAY BE IN HER EIGHTIES, BUT SHE'S EXPANDING HER MEAT PROCESSING BUSINESS BECAUSE OF DEMAND...

THE BURT FAMILY HAS BEEN IN THE MEAT PROCESSING BUSINESS FOR SIXTY YEARS, AND RECENTLY THEY'VE BEEN EXPANDING TO KEEP UP WITH DEMAND.

BURT'S MEATS AND POULTRY IS A FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS IN EYOTA, IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA. WHEN THE BURT FAMILY MOVED INTO THE CURRENT SHOP DOWNTOWN IN 2001, IT WAS SET UP TO BE A STATE-INSPECTED FACILITY. THEY SET IT UP FOR FEDERAL USDA INSPECTION, IN ORDER TO SHIP MEAT ACROSS STATE LINES AND INTERNATIONALLY. JOANN BURT IS STILL IN CHARGE OF THE OPERATION, IN HER MID-EIGHTIES, AND HER SONS KYE AND KERMIT RUN THE DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS. BEEF PRICES ARE HIGH RIGHT NOW, BUT SO IS DEMAND. PRODUCTION HAS RAMPED UP RECENTLY, SO THEY'VE BEEN EXPANDING.

Joann Burt: WE HAD TO ADD A COUPLE MORE FREEZERS, SO WE'VE NOW GOT FOUR FREEZERS IN HERE AND TWO COOLERS, AND WE STARTED OUT WITH ONE OF EACH, SO WE'VE REALLY EXPANDED IN THAT PART.

JOANN SAYS SHE'S NOT READY TO RETIRE, BUT SHE HOPES HER SONS, AND THEN THEIR CHILDREN, WILL CONTINUE TO RUN THE BUSINESS.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

LANDOWNERS IN THE DAKOTAS ARE FACING LAWSUITS OVER THEIR REFUSAL TO ALLOW SURVEYING FOR THE PROPOSED SUMMIT CARBON PIPELINE.

AND THE AG INNOVATION CAMPUS IN CROOKSTON, MINNESOTA, IS CLOSING IN ON COMPLETION OF EXTERIOR CONSTRUCTION.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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