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AgweekTV Full Show: Proposition 12, barley for pet food, planting plans, vet camp

This week on AgweekTV, the Proposition 12 case moves to the Supreme Court, and we'll find out what it means for the entire ag industry. Barley growers look at the pet food market as a lucrative alternative. We'll find out what farmers intend to plant this spring with high commodity prices heating up the acreage battle. And the North Dakota State vet students give kids a chance to be a vet.

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This week on AgweekTV, the Proposition 12 case moves to the Supreme Court, and we'll find out what it means for the entire ag industry. Barley growers look at the pet food market as a lucrative alternative. We'll find out what farmers intend to plant this spring with high commodity prices heating up the acreage battle. And the North Dakota State vet students give kids a chance to be a vet.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE U.S. SUPREME COURT HAS DECIDED TO HEAR THE CASE AGAINST CALIFORNIA'S PROPOSITION 12, FILED BY THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU AND NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS COUNCIL.

IT PROHIBITS THE SALE OF PORK FROM HOGS BORN TO SOWS NOT RAISED UNDER THE STATE'S HIGHLY PRESCRIPTIVE HOUSING STANDARDS. MINNESOTA PORK CEO DAVE PREISLER SAYS NPPC HAS WAGED A LEGAL BATTLE AGAINST THE BALLOT INITIATIVE SINCE IS WAS APPROVED IN NOVEMBER 2018, ARGUING AT THE U.S. DISTRICT AND APPELLATE COURT LEVELS, THAT PROP 12 VIOLATES THE CONSTIUTION'S COMMERCE CLAUSE.

HE SAYS THIS IS AN IMPORTANT CASE FOR NOT ONLY PORK PRODUCERS, BUT ALL OF AGRICULTURE.

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Dave Preisler // MN Pork Producers Assn CEO: If you have a successful route for things like this to happen, we'll see other agricultural practices challenged too.

HE SAYS NPPC AND AFBF WILL FILE INITIAL BRIEFS IN THE COMING WEEKS, BUT THE HIGH COURT MAY NOT HAND DOWN A DECISION UNTIL THE END OF 2022.

SOME FARMERS IN THE REGION HAVE ALREADY STARTED EARLY SEEDING OF SMALL GRAINS INTO DRY SOILS.

THE LATEST DROUGHT MONITOR STILL SHOWS NEARLY TWO- THIRDS OF SOUTH DAKOTA IS SOME LEVEL OF DROUGHT. SDSU EXTENSION STATE CLIMATOLOGIST LAURA EDWARDS SAYS THE OUTLOOK FOR THE REST OF THE SPRING PLANTING SEASON ISN'T ENCOURAGING EITHER.

EDWARDS SAYS THAT'S A CONCERN BECAUSE 40-PERCENT OF THE MOISTURE FOR THE YEAR COMES IN THAT TIME PERIOD. AND BEYOND THAT THERE'S A HIGH PROBABILITY OF WARMER AND DRIER CONDITIONS ALL THE WAY THROUGH AUGUST. SHE SAYS LA NINA HAS CONTINUED TO HANG ON, WHICH IS UNUSUAL AS IT USUALLY STARTS TO FADE BY MARCH.

USDA'S PROSPECTIVE PLANTINGS REPORT WAS BULLISH FOR CORN WITH FARMERS INTENDING TO PLANT 3.87 MILLION FEWER ACRES THAN LAST YEAR. SOME OF THOSE ACRES SHIFTED INTO SOYBEANS WITH INTENSIONS UP 3.8 MILLION ACRES FROM 2021 AT A RECORD 91 MILLION ACRES. ALL WHEAT ACRES WERE ALSO UP 700,000, WITH A 2-PERCENT INCREASE IN WINTER WHEAT BUT A 2-PERCENT DECREASE IN SPRING WHEAT.

QUARTERLY STOCKS ON CORN WERE UP 16 MILLION BUSHELS OVER LAST YEAR, SOYBEANS WERE AROUND 370 MILLION BUSHELS HIGHER, WITH WHEAT STOCKS TIGHTER BY 290 MILLION BUSHELS.

JOINING US WITH ANALYSIS ARE FRAYNE OLSON AND RANDY MARTINSON. WELL, THE BIGGEST SURPRISE IN THE REPORT, 91 MILLION ACRES OF SOYBEANS, WHICH IS A RECORD, AND ONE OF THE FEW TIMES WE SEE SOYBEAN ACRES ABOVE CORN, RIGHT?

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Frayne Olson: YEAH, IT HAS. THERE WAS ONE OTHER YEAR WHERE WE DID HAVE AT LEAST IN THE INITIAL PROSPECTIVE PLANTINGS REPORT, WHERE SOYBEANS WERE ABOVE CORN, BUT BY THE TIME WE GOT TO ACTUALLY PUTTING SEED IN THE GROUND CORN IT HAD PUT BACK SO CORN WAS STILL THE DOMINANT CROP. AGAIN, REALLY BIG SURPRISE. WE WERE EXPECTING A SHIFT, THE SHIFT WAS MUCH LARGER THAN I THINK ANYBODY ANTICIPATED.

AND OUT OF CORN, ALMOST 3.8 MILLION ACRES, SO ALMOST A ONE TO ONE SHIFT HERE RANDY, AND OBVIOUSLY SOME OF THAT BECAUSE OF FERTILIZER PRICES?

Randy Martinson: YEAH, I THINK A LOT OF IT WAS THAT, AND THEN WHEN YOU LOOK AT IT, AS FAR AS THE CORN BELT'S CONCERNED, IT WAS ALMOST A ONE TO ONE SHIFT GOING OVER TO SOYBEANS, WHICH THEY'RE TAKING AWAY SOME OF THEIR DOUBLE, OR YOU KNOW CORN ON CORN ACRES, AND PUTTING IN SOYBEANS TO KIND OF LOWER THEIR INPUT COSTS. YOU KNOW, IT WAS A LITTLE BIT OF A SURPRISE. I DIDN'T EXPECT TO SEE CORN ACRES TAKE SUCH A HIT, OR SOYBEANS INCREASE AS MUCH. NOW IT'S GOING TO BE INTERESTING TO SEE HOW THINGS GO FROM HERE.

SO DO YOU GUYS THINK WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO BUY SOME CORN ACRES NOW?

Frayne Olson: YES I THINK THERE'S DEFINITELY GOING TO BE AN INCENTIVE TO TRY AND SHIFT SOME OF THOSE ACRES BACK, TO TRY AND REBALANCE. AND IF THESE NUMBERS HAD COME OUT BEFORE RUSSIA UKRAINE WAR, OR IF THAT HADN'T HAPPENED, I THINK THE NUMBERS WOULD PROBABLY STICK. BUT GIVEN THE DYNAMICS AND SHIFTS BECAUSE OF THE WAR, THE CORN ACRES ARE GOING TO BE AT A PREMIUM THIS YEAR. I THINK WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO REBALANCE, AND THE MARKET'S GOING TO WORK VERY HARD TO DO THAT.

WHAT'S IT GOING TO TAKE TO GET TO THAT? BECAUSE WE ALREADY HAVE TO CORN TO SOYBEAN RATIO FAVORING CORN.

Frayne Olson: IT'S GOING TO HAVE TO WORK PRETTY HARD. AS RANDY WAS SAYING, YOU KNOW, SOME OF THOSE ARE GOING TO BE CORN ON CORN ACRES, OR WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO TRY THEM AGAINST SOME OF THE SMALLER MARKET CROPS, AND THE SPECIALTY CROPS., WHICH HAVE ALREADY BEEN CONTRACTED. SO THE CORN MARKET'S GOING TO HAVE TO WORK PRETTY HARD TO MAKE SURE THAT WE GET THAT SHIFT OCCURRING.

SO WHEAT ACRES, ALL WHEAT ACRES, WERE UP ABOUT 700 THOUSAND ACRES. BUT WE WERE DOWN IN SPRING WHEAT, MUCH MORE THAN THE TRADE ANTICIPATED, AND RANDY I'VE TO GIVE YOU CREDIT, BECAUSE I KNOW YOU CALLED THAT ONE EARLY ON.

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Randy Martinson: WELL YOU KNOW, IT MADE SENSE. IT DIDN'T LOOK LIKE WHEAT WAS OUT THERE TRYING TO BUY ACRES AND WE HAD SUCH GOOD CONTRACTS ON A LOT OF THE SPECIALTY CROPS, BARLEY, YOU KNOW, SUNFLOWERS, CANOLA, PEAS. I ,MEAN, SO EVERYTHING WAS OUT THERE TRYING TO BUY ACRES. AND SPRING WHEAT, WITH THE HIGHER COST OF PUTTING IT IN, WITH THE FERTILIZER JUST DIDN'T ADD UP, SO IT MADE SENSE THAT WE WERE GOING TO SEE A LITTLE BIT OF A DOWNWARD TREND AS FAR AS SPRING WHEAT ACRES ARE CONCERNED. I WAS SURPRISED IT WAS AS BIG AS IT WAS, AND I WAS SURPRISED THAT DURUM ACRES GOT A LITTLE BIT MORE, BECAUSE IT REALLY WASN'T AN INCENTIVE TO PLANT DURUM.

SO WHAT PRICE WILL IT TAKE TO GET A FEW ACRES OF SPRING WHEAT? WE'RE GOING TO NEED MORE, SO WHAT'S THE FUNCTION OF THE MARKET NOW?

Randy Martinson: I THINK RIGHT NOW WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO TAKE THIS MARKET BACK UP TO THE CONTRACT HIGHS TO TRY TO GET ACRES.

SO QUARTERLY STOCKS NOT AS BIG OF A MARKET MOVER, JUST BECAUSE A LOT OF THESE NUMBERS CAME IN PRETTY CLOSE TO TRADE ESTIMATES. BUT WE STILL HAVE AN INCREASE IN SOYBEAN QUARTERLY STOCKS BY LIKE 370 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT FRAYNE IT'S BECAUSE OF WHEN WE TOOK THE SURVEYS?

Frayne Olson: SO SINCE THE SURVEY WAS TAKEN, THE INDUSTRY BASED SURVEY WAS TAKEN, WE HAVE SEEN A PRETTY NICE REBOUND OR RECOVERY IN SOYBEAN EXPORTS NOT ONLY TO CHINA, BUT ALSO TO MEXICO. AND THOSE NUMBERS FOR THESE KIND OF OFF-SEASON SALES, THE SALES WE NORMALLY DON'T GET AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, WILL REALLY BE REFLECTED THEN IN THAT JULY ONE REPORT.

AND WHEAT QUARTERLY STOCKS DOWN 290 MILLION BUSHELS, WHICH IS A LITTLE SURPRISING. I KNOW WE HAD A SMALLER CROP, BUT EXPORTS HAVE NOT BEEN THAT GOOD, HAVE THEY RANDY?

Randy Martinson: NOT IN WHEAT THEY HAVEN'T, NO. AND WE NEED, IT'S LIKELY U.S.A.'S GOING TO HAVE TO DECREASE WHEAT EXPORTS AND SO YEAH I THINK IT'S MAINLY, PRIMARILY DUE TO MAYBE A LITTLE BIT OF WHEAT GOING INTO THE FEED RATION MORE THAN WE ANTICIPATED AND ALSO BECAUSE OF THE SMALLER CROP.

THANKS SO MUCH RANDY MARTINSON, FRAYNE OLSON WITH OUR AGWEEK MARKET ANALYSIS.>

EVERY ACRE WILL BE IMPORTANT THIS YEAR WITH THE LOSS OF ACRES IN THE BLACK SEA REGION DUE TO THE WAR.

AS A RESULT, FARM GROUPS, INCLUDING THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU AND THE NATIONAL FEED AND GRAIN ASSOCIATION, ARE PRESSURING USDA TO ALLOW FARMERS TO PLANT ON MORE THAN FOUR MILLION PRIME CRP ACRES WITHOUT PENALTY. THEY SAY IT WOULD RESULT IN ANOTHER 18.7 MILLION TONS OF GRAIN AND HELP TO FILL THE LIKELY LACK OF CORN, WHEAT, AND SUNFLOWER OIL COMING FROM UKRAINE. MEANWHILE THE EU IS ALLOWING ABOUT 5-PERCENT OF SET A SIDE TO BE PLANTED WITHOUT PENALTY.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, BARLEY IS THE KEY INGREDIENT IN BEER, BUT IT TURNS OUT IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR PETS, TOO. WE'LL EXPLAIN, AFTER THIS.

THE BEST BARLEY ISN'T JUST FOR BEER ANY MORE. YOUR PETS CAN ENJOY IT TOO. ROSE DUNN JOINS US NOW TO EXPLAIN, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

WHEN WE THINK OF BARLEY, WE THINK OF BEER, BUT THIS MAY SURPRISE YOU...

UP TO 30% OF THE BARLEY GROWN IN NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA IS SOLD TO PET FOOD COMPANIES.

THE USE OF BARLEY IN PET FOOD STARTED GROWING ABOUT SEVEN YEARS AGO, FOR SEVERAL REASONS. IT'S HIGH IN PROTEIN, HIGH IN FIBER, AND IT'S KNOWN AS A CARBOHYDRATE THAT DOESN'T MAKE PETS JITTERY LIKE SOME OTHER CARBS DO. THAT MAKES IT A PREFERRED INGREDIENT OVER CORN AND RICE.

BARLEY ACREAGE HAD DROPPED STEADILY IN THE PAST FEW DECADES, AS CORN AND SOYBEANS HAVE GROWN. WHILE BARLEY PRODUCTION IS DOWN ABOUT 90 PERCENT OFF A RECORD 184 MILLION BUSHLS SET IN 1984, STEVE EDWARDSON OF THE NORTH DAKOTA BARLEY COUNCIL SAYS THE PET FOOD BOOST IS GOOD FOR THE BARLEY INDUSTRY.

TWO GRAIN TRADERS ARE FACING FINES IN SOUTH DAKOTA FOR OPERATING IN THE STATE WITHOUT A LICENSE.

THE SOUTH DAKOTA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION SAYS CROSSROADS COOPERATIVE OF SIDNEY, NEBRASKA MADE MORE THAN 700 ILLEGAL GRAIN PURCHASES OVER 2-PLUS YEARS. SOUTH DAKOTA ALLOWS A FINE OF A THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR EACH VIOLATION. BUT THE PENALTY IS CAPPED AT 20-THOUSAND, PENDING PUC APPROVAL

ATLANTIC GRAIN AND TRADE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, WITH OFFICES IN CHASKA, MINNESOTA , WAS FINED 10-THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR BUYING ABOUT 70 TRAINCAR LOADS OF GRAIN WITHOUT A LICENSE.

MINNESOTA HAS CONFIRMED ITS FIRST CASES OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN FLU, ACTIVATING A FEDERAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM.

A TEAM OF USDA EMERGENCY RESPONDERS WILL WORK WITH MINNESOTA'S AGRICULTURAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM, TO QUARANTINE INFECTED FLOCKS IN AFFECTED COUNTIES, AND WATCH FOR MORE DISEASE. THE HEAD OF MINNESOTA'S BOARD OF ANIMAL HEALTH SAYS THE VIRUS IS DIFFERENT THAN IN 2015 AS ITS COMING EARLIER, EVEN BEFORE THE MAIN BIRD MIGRATION TAKES PLACE. SHE SAYS THIS IS A VERY HOT VIRUS.

HOWEVER, THOMPSON'S HOPEFUL, WITH THE STRONG BIOSECURITY MEASURES ADOPTED IN 2015, THEY'LL BE ABLE TO KEEP THE DISEASE CONTAINED. MINNESOTA IS THE NATION'S TOP TURKEY STATE, PRODUCING 40 MILLION BIRDS EACH YEAR. ON WEDNESDAY NORTH DAKOTA ALSO REPORTED ITS FIRST CASES IN WILD AND DOMESTIC BIRDS IN KIDDER COUNTY.

THERE'S SOME GOOD NEWS ON THE TRADE FRONT FOR CATTLE PRODUCERS.

THE U.S. AND JAPAN HAVE REACHED AN AGREEMENT TO INCREASE THE BEEF SAFEGUARD TRIGGER ON JAPAN'S IMPORTS OF U.S. BEEF. IT INCLUDES A NEW THREE-TRIGGER MECHANISM THAT MAKES IT LESS LIKELY U.S. EXPORTS WILL REACH LEVELS TO TRIGGER THE HIGHER TARIFF. IT ALSO PUTS U.S. BEEF ON A LEVEL TARIFF PLAYING FIELD WITH MAJOR COMPETITORS IN THE COMPREHENSIVE AND PROGRESSIVE AGREEMENT FOR TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP.

THIS WEEK'S QUARTERLY HOGS AND PIGS REPORT WAS BULLISH AND CONTINUES TO CONFIRM CONTRACTION IN THE U.S. HERD WITH ALL CATEGORIES BELOW 2021..

THE MARCH 1 HOG INVENTORY, KEPT FOR BREEDING AN KEPT FOR MARKETING NUMBERS WERE ALL AT 98-PERCENT OF A YEAR AGO, AND BELOW TRADE EXPECTATIONS.

THE FARROWING INTENSIONS WERE ALSO DOWN FROM 2021 BY ONE TO TWO PERCENT WITH THE WEIGHT BREAKDOWNS ON HOGS 120 POUNDS AND ABOVE COMING IN 4-PERCENT BELOW 2021.

DISEASES LIKE PRRS AND PEDV, PLUS HIGH FEED COSTS HAVE CONTINUED TO STIFLE EXPANSION IN THE PORK SECTOR.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV...A BRAND NEW CAMP GIVES KIDS THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE IF VET LIFE IS UP THEIR ALLEY..

SOME AREAS OF THE REGION RECEIVED SOME WELCOME PRECIP THIS WEEK WHICH WILL BE NEEDED WITH A DRIER LONG TERM OUTLOOK FOR ALOT OF OUR REGION.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

LOTS OF KIDS SAY THEY WANT TO BE A VETERINARIAN WHEN THEY GROW UP, AND NOW NDSU IS GIVING THEM THE CHANCE TO CHECK IT OUT.

THE UNIVERSITY'S PRE-VET CLUB HELD ITS FIRST "I WANNA BE A VET" KID CAMP RECENTLY.

OUR EMILY BEAL WAS THERE AND HAS MORE...

MICHELLE, THIS WAS DEFINITELY A DAY FOR CHILDREN WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN ANIMAL HEALTH AND LEARNING ABOUT BEING A VETERINARIAN.

Faith: BECAUSE I LOVE ANIMALS.

SHE THINKS THIS CAMP CAN GIVE HER A HEAD START IN A CAREER WORKING WITH ANIMALS, AND HER MOM AGREES.

Becky Schwab: MY DAUGHTER LOVES ANIMALS. SHE LOVES EVERY TYPE OF ANIMAL THERE IS.

SO SHE ARRANGED FOR HER DAUGHTER AND SOME OF HER 4-H FRIENDS TO ATTEND THE CAMP AS A BIRTHDAY SURPRISE.

Becky Schwab: SHE WANTS TO GROW UP AND BE A VET, SO THIS SEEMED LIKE THE PERFECT START TO DO WHAT SHE LOVES, AND SEE IF SHE WANTS TO STILL MOVE THAT DIRECTION.THE CAMP WAS GEARED FOR CHILDREN FROM SEVEN TO TWELVE. KIDS LEARNED A LITTLE ABOUT A BROAD RANGE OF ANIMAL CARES. ORGANIZERS FROM NDSU'S PRE-VET CLUB SAY IT'S A GREAT WAY FOR KIDS TO GET A TASTE OF VET LIFE,

Do you wamt to come over here and get a loook at his hooves?

ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE WHO DON'T GROW UP AROUND ANIMALS.

Mikayla Hjelden: I KNOW EVERY KID IS LIKE, I WANT TO BE A VET WHEN I'M OLDER. BUT I THINK IT'S IMPORTANT FOR THEM TO LEARN KIND OF WHAT ELSE KIND OF GOES INTO IT, SO THAT THEY KNOW IT'S NOT JUST PETTING AND SEEING ANIMALS ALL DAY. SO THEY'RE LEARNING INJECTIONS AND HOW TO LIKE MEDICATE AND LEARN TO WRAP AND X-RAY AND STUFF LIKE THAT.AURORA HOPES TO BE A LARGE ANIMAL VET SOMEDAY. THAT 'S SOMETHING THAT'S IN VERY SHORT SUPPLY RIGHT NOW.

Aurora: BECAUSE MY AUNTIE'S A VET, AND BECAUSE I LIKE HELPING ANIMALS.

THIS WAS THE CAMP'S FIRST YEAR, AND MORE THAN SIXTY KIDS ATTENDED. THANKS EMILY.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WHERE THEY'RE LEARNING ABOUT THE REGION'S TOP INDUSTRY...

CONSUMERS LEARNED ABOUT REGION'S NUMBER ONE INDUSTRY AT AG DAY AT THE PAVILION IN SIOUX FALLS.

THE ANNUAL EVENT FEATURES SOUTH DAKOTA FARM GROUPS HIGHLIGHTING VARIOUS COMMODITIES. KIDS COULD PET A PIG OR BABY CHICKS AND LEARN ABOUT THE CORN AND SOYBEAN MEAL THEY EAT AS FEED. THEY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN OTHER FAMILY FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES TO BRING THE FARM TO THE CITY, LIKE PLANTING SOYBEANS.

AG DAY AT THE PAVILION WAS ALSO A CELEBRATION OF NATIONAL AG WEEK.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

ADMITTING IT HAD OUTDATED INFORMATION, THE EPA HAS LIFTED RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF ENLIST HERBICIDES IN 134 COUNTIES, INCLUDING SIX IN MINNESOTA.

AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA IS PLANNING A 220 MILLION DOLLAR AG AND FOOD SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND INNOVATION COMPLEX NEAR AUSTIN.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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