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AgweekTV Full Show: Prop 12 decision, South Dakota flower farm, Little Sprouts Learning Center, Red E

The U.S. Supreme Court makes a decision on Prop 12. We check out a South Dakota flower farm. Learn about one one community's solution to the child care shortage. Red E wins a big award.

This week on AgweekTV, the United States Supreme Court makes a big decision affecting pork producers who do business in California. We kick off our follow a farmer series for the season with a unique operation in South Dakota. The child care crunch continues to surge in rural communities — see one community's solution. And a North Dakota ag engineering business gets quite the award, all while meeting the president.

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StormTRACKER meterologist John Wheeler says above-average -- though not scorching -- temperatures are setting in to begin summer, and any moisture appears scattered and not particularly organized.
We're coming to you from Ag Spray Equipment for our planting show special. We'll check in on planting progress, on a serious shortage of FSA workers and on a new way to keep up on your soil's health.
AgweekTV's Emily Beal talks to Frayne Olson of NDSU about what growers can expect to see in the grain markets throughout the 2023 growing season.
StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says warm weather has finally set in. And while there may be some thunderstorms, he doesn't see any big precipitation systems over the next couple weeks.
South Dakota showcases ag with agritourism. Minnesota dairy royalty throws the first pitch for the St. Paul Saints. We address the rural day care shortage. And four-legged friends meet eager guests.
The second half of May looks likely to dry out and have some pleasant conditions, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says in this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL. THE U.S.SUPREME COURT IS SIDING WITH THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, TO UPHOLD A STATEWIDE BAN ON SELLING PORK THAT WAS RAISED IN TIGHT SPACES LIKE GESTATION CRATES. IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, WE TAKE A LOOK AT HOW PROPOSITION 12 WILL IMPACT PRODUCERS ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

By July first, pork farmers will have to make serious changes if they plan to market their hogs in California.

Producers here will have to comply. It's a little unknown how those regulations are going to be implemented as far as on the farm. These new regulations don't necessarily benefit the pigs either. I think it was maybe not understood by the public that the gestation stalls actually help protect the sow. Yes, they don't have the freedom of movement to turn around and they don't have as much space, but they are a social animal with a social hierarchy, and they sometimes can be hard on each other, so they can fight and that results in injury.

Implementing these practices is going to be expensive.

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If you look at the footprint of a sow farm today, for example, you're either going to have to add square footage to comply with the 24-square-feet requirement, or you're going to have less animals on that site.

And it is a cost that is going to be reflected at the meat counter.

It's disappointing for pig farmers, but I think let us not also forget the impact that it has on consumers. Because the ones that are going to really be impacted at the end of the day are going to be California consumers. And in an environment in which California consumers are already dealing with some of the highest food prices in the country, this decision will just compound that impact.

But the increased regulations could create a premium for producers looking to sell pork in California.

Pen gestation doesn't really cause a loss of productivity, it just increases the costs, so if there is a premium there that California consumers can pay, I think there will be some producers very interested in changing. It will be an economic point I think at the end of the day.

But despite the changes, pig producers look toward the future.

Pig farmers are resilient, and they're going to figure out how to move forward, and continue to provide great animal care to the animals that they're responsible for. While also ensuring that they can provide a wholesome, affordable product for consumers in California and elsewhere.

PROPOSITION 12 ALSO IMPACTS THE CONFINEMENT OF EGG-LAYING HENS AND VEAL CALVES. YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR AT AGWEEK.COM

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FINDING CHILDCARE IS A BIG CHALLENGE FOR MANY PARENTS, ESPECIALLY IN SMALL TOWNS AND RURAL AREAS. BUT ONE NORTHWEST MINNESOTA COMMUNITY IS PUTTING A LOT OF RESOURCES INTO A NEW AFFORDABLE DAYCARE CENTER.

AVAILABILITY OF AFFORDABLE DAYCARE IS HUGE, IT'S REALLY THE BASIC STEP FOR GROWING A COMMUNITY. THEY SAY IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO RAISE A CHILD, AND WHILE WARREN, MINNESOTA ISN'T EXACTLY A VILLAGE, THE TOWN IS RAISING MONEY TO HELP EASE THE CHILD CARE SHORTAGE THAT'S COSTING THE COMMUNITY YOUNG FAMILIES.

GETTING AWARENESS OUT THERE OF HOW BAD THE CHILDCARE ISSUE IS, AND HOW IT DOES AFFECT EVERY COMMUNITY MEMBER, NOT JUST YOUNG PARENTS.

LINDSEY BUEGLER IS ON THE BOARD OF THE LITTLE SPROUTS LEARNING CENTER. WHEN HER KIDS WERE AT THE CENTER EIGHT YEARS AGO, IT RAN INTO FINANCIAL TROUBLE, AND WAS CLOSING. SHE AND OTHERS CAME UP WITH A PLAN TO RUN IT AS A NON-PROFIT, WITH HELP FROM THE COMMUNITY.

I'VE BEEN FIGHTING THE GOOD FIGHT EVER SINCE, JUST TRYING TO KEEP IT OPEN AND HELP RUN DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS. WORKING WITH OTHER COMMUNITY MEMBERS, THEY WERE LIKE OK, WE CAN KEEP THIS GOING.

BUT THAT WASN'T ENOUGH. THE GROWING TOWN NEEDED A BIGGER FACILITY. WHEN COMMUNITY LEADERS LEARNED ABOUT THE DAY CARE SHORTAGE, THEY DEVELOPED A PLAN TO BUILD MORE AFFORDABLE CHILDCARE, JUST LIKE THEY HAD STEPPED UP EARLIER FOR THEIR SCHOOL, HOSPITAL AND ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY.

SO I THINK THAT'S WHY OUR SCHOOL IS GROWING, AND THAT'S WHY OUR COMMUNITY IS GROWING, AND IN ORDER TO MAINTAIN OR EVEN INCREASE THAT GROWTH, YOU HAVE TO HAVE DAYCARE.

THE CITY IS BUILDING A TWO-POINT-SIX MILLION DOLLAR CENTER. IT'S FINANCED WITH GRANTS, LOANS, DONATIONS, AND A LOCAL SALES TAX. CITY ADMINISTRATOR SHANNON MORTENSON SAYS WARREN MAY BE THE FIRST CITY IN THE NATION TO USE A LOCAL SALES TAX FOR DAYCARE. THE LACK OF DEBT WILL KEEP COSTS DOWN FOR PARENTS, AND ALLOW THE CENTER TO PAY WORKERS HIGHER WAGES THAN DAYCARES IN NEIGHBORING TOWNS. MORTENSON SAYS IT'S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE CITY'S GROWTH.

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YES, THEY'RE EXCITED. IT'S A LOT OF CHANGE AT ONE TIME, YOU KNOW WHEN YOU HAVE THE EXPANSION OF THE SCHOOL AND DAYCARE STARTING AND YOU'VE GOT NEWER PEOPLE MOVING INTO YOUR COMMUNITY. YES. I'M VERY OPTIMISTIC. THE NEW CENTER WILL HAVE ROOM FOR 110 KIDS, MORE THAN DOUBLE THE SIZE OF THE OLD ONE. IT'S EXPECTED TO OPEN IN MARCH.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV... WE'LL MEET A NORTH DAKOTA FARMING COUPLE THAT'S NOT SHEEPISH ABOUT MARKETING THEIR LAMBS...

OUR AGWEEK SPECIAL REPORT THIS MONTH TAKES A DEEP DIVE INTO MEAT PROCESSING. THE BUSINESS IS EXPANDING FOR ONE LOCAL PROCESSOR IN WESTERN SOUTH DAKOTA, THANKS TO A 3.3. MILLION DOLLAR USDA GRANT. OVER THE PAST COUPLE YEARS, WALL MEATS HAS NOTICED AN INCREASED DEMAND FOR LOCAL MEAT PROCESSING.

PRIOR TO COVID, WE WERE PROCESSING ABOUT 500 ANIMALS, ABOUT 300 BEEF, 200 HOGS, DURING AND AFTER COVID, WE WERE UP OVER 700 ANIMALS, 800, SO WE HAD ALMOST DOUBLED OUR CAPACITY FOR THIS LITTLE LOCATION.

ONLY HAVING A 24 HUNDRED SQUARE FOOD PROCESSING FACILITY IN WALL AND A RETAIL LOCATION IN RAPID CITY, THEY ARE EXCITED TO EXPAND BY BUILDING A LARGER PROCESSING FACILITY IN NEW UNDERWOOD. THAT SHOULD HAVE A CAPACITY OF 4,000 HEAD PER YEAR.

IT HELPS TAKE CARE OF THE RANCHERS AND PRODUCERS IN THE LOCAL AREA AS WELL AS SOME OF THEM THAT ARE A LITTLE FURTHER OUT AND IT ALSO ALLOWS US TO TAKE CARE OF INDIVIDUAL CUSTOMERS THAT RELY ON OUR PRODUCT.

THEY WILL ALSO GET BETTER PROCESSING EQUIPMENT.

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THE AMOUNT OF PRODUCT THAT CAN COME OUT OF THAT OR BE PUSHED OUT OF CERTAIN EQUIPMENT LIKE THAT DEFINITELY ENHANCES OUR CAPABILITIES FOR MASS PRODUCTION. WITH MANY PARTNERSHIPS IN THE COMMUNITY, THE COMPANY IS ALSO MAKING SURE PEOPLE KNOW EXACTLY WHERE THEIR MEAT COMES FROM. WE ARE ONE OF THE FEW THAT I KNOW OF, IF NOT THE ONLY ONE, THAT WE PUT THE RANCHERS NAME RIGHT ON THE PACKAGE WHEN WE PUT IT OUT IN THE PUBLIC. WORKING HARD TO ENSURE MORE LOCAL PROTEIN IS ACCESSIBLE TO CONSUMERS.

THAT GRANT, IT IS GOING TO ALLOW US TO EXPAND AND BE ABLE TO HELP MORE PEOPLE.

MY GOAL IS TO TRY TO MAKE SURE THAT WE CAN SUPPORT MORE PEOPLE IN WHAT THEY ARE TRYING TO DO WHILE STREAM LINING OUR PROCESS AS WELL. WALL MEATS IS HOPING TO BREAK GROUND ON THE NEW FACILITY WITHIN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS, AND PLANS TO OPEN THE PLANT WITHIN 18 MONTHS. LAMBING IN THE REGION CAN BE SEEM AS LUCRATIVE TO SOME, WITH NOT VERY MANY PLACES TO MARKET YOUR SHEEP. I VISITED STROH FARMS, IN TAPPEN NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE THEY OVERCAME THAT OBSTACLE.

TO ME, FOR US RIGHT NOW IN THE SHEEP INDUSTRY, THE BIGGEST THING IS JUST MARKETING.

BRENT AND HIS WIFE, BARB STROH, RAISE SHEEP AND CATTLE ON THEIR OPERATION OUTSIDE OF TAPPEN, NORTH DAKOTA. THEY ALSO GROW SMALL GRAINS AND CORN . THEY LAMB OUT AROUND SEVEN-HUNDRED AND FIFTY EWES A YEAR. WITH THAT MANY LAMBS HITTING THE GROUND, THE STROHS NEEDED A PLACE TO MARKET THEIR STOCK. SO THEY BEGAN WORKING WITH A MARKETER IN WISCONSIN.

Years ago we started doing it, there's just not a lot of places to market lambs and stuff like that, finish lambs. So we started working with this company probably back in the eighties.

THEY PULL TOGETHER A SIZABLE MOUNT OF LAMBS FROM DIFFERENT PLACES IN THE REGION. THE LAMBS ARE FINISHED OUT AROUND ONE-HUNDRED FORTY TO ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY POUNDS.

We pull lambs here, so we'll probably market anywhere from 3-4,000 lambs here a year.

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CATTLE DOMINATE NORTH DAKOTA, SO OFTEN TIMES THE STROHS GO TO WYOMING OR SOUTH DAKOTA TO GET MORE HEADS FOR THEIR HERD.

It's hard to find numbers, so you gotta go west to get numbers.

And then I'll just spend my time doing the stuff with the sheep, a lot easier for me to handle.

BARB STROH ENJOYS WORKING WITH THEIR SHEEP HERD AND GETTING TO MAKE CONNECTIONS WITH OTHER SHEEP PRODUCERS WHO DROP THEIR SHEEP OFF AT THE STROH'S FOR MARKETING.

You get a pretty good group. I like it because they're all living that same thing that you are. They understand everything that you're going through, whether it's good or bad. A fun group of people, it's kind of like a little sheep family I guess.

THE STROHS SEND ABOUT THREE-HUNDRED AND FIFTY LAMBS PER LOAD, EVERY TWO TO THREE WEEKS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV... WE'LL TAKE YOU TO A FARM THAT WILL SOON BE BLOOMING FIELDS OF FLOWERS...

AGWEEK WEATHER IS SPONSORED BY BREMER BANK. CONNECT WITH A BANKER TODAY A BREMER DOT COM

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WILL THE WEATHER COOPERATE LONG ENOUGH FOR FARMERS TO PLANT THEIR ACRES? HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRIWEATHER OUTLOOK.

As the calendar turns toward June, most people would say, we're getting to the point where you can pretty much call it summer, realistically. Many areas Northern Plains, Great Lakes, it's still kind of a spring weather pattern most years, but this year it's actually looking like a more summer time weather pattern. Generally speaking, over the United States, we're seeing mostly warmer than average weather where it's cooler a little further north and generally pretty seasonably warm weather across the south. And overall, I'm not seeing a lot of really well-organized heavy precipitation, at least over the next two weeks as we segway into the June months. Of course, the showers and thunderstorms take over from the general rains systems when you get into warmer weather and everything really depends on the jet stream. With the jet stream generally remaining along the U.S. Canadian border this week. We're going to keep most of the U.S. pretty warm. Snow's melting pretty rapidly in the Rockies. Most of the really cool air is limited to the higher elevations. Florida, Texas and the desert southwest, the Mojave Desert are the areas that are notably hot this week with a lotof weather in the nineties. Most of the United States here will be in the seventies and eighties, just fairly comfortable spring weather. And it looks like it's going to stay that way. The jet will meander a bit. There's a little branch of the polar jet stream coming around and keeping kind of encircling the Hudson Bay region and keeping some pretty cool weather up in that territory. But we're seeing this is really the last little vestige of what had been a giant wedge of cold air dominating the Great Lakes and the northern plains throughout much of February, March and April. So that pattern is still there. It's just retreated with the sun and we're being left with a seasonal to slightly warmer than average weather this week. Toward the weekend, there will be a little bit of trough in the jet stream over the northern Rockies, Pacific Northwest. That will likely bring a couple of rounds of thunderstorms into the northern plains. I don't expect to see widespread heavy rain unless one complex of storms really gets going. Hot weather generally dry except for some showery weather down along the Gulf Coast and Florida will persist in the south. And really, most of the Midwest will be just slightly warmer than average as far as precipitation goes. Heading into Memorial Day weekend, the week coming up, a few scattered areas of showers, thundershowers, maybe some thunderstorms from central Canada down into Texas. For the most part, I would not describe this as wetter than average. Just a chance for some rain and showers will be fairly limited in the eastern United States. And frankly, most of the west. Looks like it will be dry this last full week of May. And as the calendar turns to June, not a lot of change. I think the Gulf will start heating up and you'll get some of the Gulf of Mexico showers and thunderstorms from the sea breeze front and the central and northern plains.Still a little showery at times.

Produce that will feed around 100 families this summer is going in the ground at Heikes Family Farm in Vermillion, South Dakota.

The farm is a Community Supported Agriculture operation... community members can buy shares in the farm and then receive produce every week throughout the growing season.

A lot of new customers are finding out about us and they want to know who is growing their food and how it's being grown and they want to buy local and they want to support local, which I think is more and more popular is that people want to get to know their farmer and they want to be able to have access to healthy, locally grown food because around here it's hard to find.

Shareholders got their first produce, fresh asparagus, this month. Weather caused some delays this year, so the farm is just starting to get the fields planted.

ONCE AGAIN, AGWEEK REPORTERS WILL BE CHECKING IN WITH FARMERS THROUGHOUT THE SEASON IN OUR FOLLOW A FARMER SERIES, THAT KICKS OFF THIS WEEK WITH A UNIQUE OPERATION IN SOUTH DAKOTA. YOU'VE PROBABLY SEEN FARMERS OUT IN THEIR TRACTORS PLANTING CROPS THIS MONTH, BUT ONE FARMER'S PLANTING SEASON LOOKS A LITTLE DIFFERENT THAN THE REST.

CHRISTY HECKATHORN IS GETTING FLOWERS IN THE BEDS AT FLEURISH FLOWER FARM IN ELK POINT SOUTH DAKOTA. BUT THERE'S A LOT THAT HAPPENS BEFORE THE FLOWERS SEE THE SUNSHINE.

THIS YEAR, WE HAVE ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY USED A PROCESS CALLED SOIL BLOCKING, WHICH IS WHERE YOU MAKE YOUR OWN BLOCKS OUT OF DIRT. IT'S JUST A WAY MORE EFFICIENT WAY TO START SEEDS, TAKES UP LESS SPACE WHEN YOU'RE GROWING THEM, I CAN HAVE 2-300 PLANTS GROWING ON A TRAY, WHICH IF I USE KIND OF THE TRADITIONAL METHOD, TO START SEEDS, I WOULD ONLY BE ABLE TO HAVE LIKE 70 PLANTS.

THEY CAN ONLY MAKE A FEW SOIL BLOCKS AT A TIME, AND THEY NEED THOUSANDS. IT'S A LITTLE MORE LABOR INTENSIVE, BUT THE FLOWER GROW A THIRD FASTER. THE FLOWERS ARE MAKING THEIR WAY OUTSIDE A LITTLE EARLY THIS YEAR.

THE WEATHER HAS GOTTEN WARM, KIND OF ALL OF THE SUDDEN IT JUST GOT HOT OR WARM, AND SO WHEN I LOOKED AT THE EXTENDED FORECAST IT LOOKED LIKE WE WOULD BE PRETTY GOOD FOR TEMPS, SO WE HAVE A DECENT NUMBER OF SEEDLINGS PLANTED OUT ALREADY.

THEY ARE ALSO ADDING A SUNNY ADDITION TO THE FARM.

WE ARE ALSO GOING TO ADD A SUNFLOWERS, ABOUT A HALF ACRE OF SUNFLOWERS. GETTING EVERYTHING READY TO WELCOME VISITORS TO THE FLOWERING PARADISE. PEOPLE LOVE FLOWERS, THEY LOVE TO BE IN THE FLOWERS, THEY LIKE TO PICK FLOWERS, I THINK IT BRINGS UP A LOT OF MEMORIES FOR PEOPLE.
THIS YEAR, THE FARM WILL ALSO BE ADDING A PERENNIAL AREA TO THE GARDEN. YOU CAN SEE AND PICK THE FLOWERS FOR YOURSELF DURING THE U-PICK EVENTS, BEGINNING IN THE MIDDLE OF JULY.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV... TWIN BROTHERS SHARE A MAJOR HONOR FOR THEIR AG ENGINEERING BUSINESS.

THE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY IS OFTEN REFERRED TO AS THE BACKBONE OF NORTH DAKOTA. SO IT SEEMS FITTING THAT THE BRAINS BEHIND RED E, A FARGO-BASED AG ENGINEERING BUSINESS, ARE THE NORTH DAKOTA 2023 SMALL BUSINESS PEOPLE OF THE YEAR.

MATT FAUL STARTED RED E IN 2012 HIS TWIN BROTHER, JESSE, JOINED THE BUSINESS IN 2015. RED E IS A FAST-GROWING ENGINEERING SERVICES AND MANUFACTURING SUPPORT COMPANY. THEY SPECIALIZE IN REBUILDING AND UPGRADING AIR SEEDERS THAT FARMERS ALREADY OWN AND USE. THE DUO RECENTLY MADE THE TREK TO WASHINGTON DC TO RECEIVE THEIR AWARD.

We got to go into the White house, be at the rose garden right near the west wing and the president spoke and we got to meet the president. That was a real treat.

THE BROTHERS SAY THEY NEVER ANTICIPATED FOR THEIR BUSINESS TO BOOM THE WAY IT HAS, BUT ARE EXTREMELY THANKFUL.

WE'RE JUST SO GRATEFUL FOR THIS OPPORTUNITY THAT WE HAVE. THE LORD WHO HAS CARRIED US THROUGH SO MANY THINGS. OUR CUSTOMERS, REALLY THE BEST CUSTOMERS YOU CAN HAVE, THE FARMERS, OUR EMPLOYEES AND SO MANY OTHERS WHO HAVE COME ALONGSIDE US AND HELPED US GET TO WHERE WE ARE TODAY.

RED E ALSO HELD AN AWARDS CEREMONY AT THEIR FARGO LOCATION THAT WAS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC EARLIER THIS MONTH. STATE OFFICIALS, EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS WHO WORK ON THEIR BUSINESS WERE IN ATTENDANCE.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK. WE REVISIT HEART O' LAKES MEATS IN MINNESOTA TO SEE HOW THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC IMPACTED THE BUSINESS THREE YEARS AFTER WE WERE THERE LAST. AND AFTER LAST YEAR'S WIND STORMS, THE GRAND FORKS COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT SEES A BIG JUMP IN LANDOWNERS PLANTING TREES.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV. REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A WONDERFUL WEEK EVERYONE...

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