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AgweekTV Full Show: Planting woes, Grand Farm announcement, FFA chapter honored, pasture to pizza lamb

This week on AgweekTV, the cold, wet spring may mean more prevented plant acres this year. Grand Farm announces its new permanent location for its Innovation Center. A Minnesota FFA chapter is being nationally recognized for its work on mental health. And we'll visit a Suffolk sheep farm that's bringing the pasture right to your pizza.

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This week on AgweekTV, the cold, wet spring may mean more prevented plant acres this year. Grand Farm announces its new permanent location for its Innovation Center. A Minnesota FFA chapter is being nationally recognized for its work on mental health. And we'll visit a Suffolk sheep farm that's bringing the pasture right to your pizza.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

FARMERS IN MINNESOTA AND THE DAKOTAS HAVE YET TO BEGIN PLANTING CORN, AND PLANTING IS BEHIND IN MUCH OF THE COUNTRY, DUE TO THE COLD, WET WEATHER.

ON MAY 1ST OF LAST YEAR, 42% OF THE CORN ACRES WERE PLANTED. THIS YEAR, THE 14% NATIONAL NUMBER IS THE LOWEST SINCE 2013.

AND IT'S EVEN WORSE IN THE NORTHERN CORN BELT. THE DAKOTAS AND MINNESOTA HAVE VIRTUALLY NO CORN PLANTED AS OF MAY FIRST. HOWEVER, AT 35%, IOWA IS AHEAD OF THE NATIONAL AVERAGE, BUT STILL BEHIND ITS STATE AVERAGE FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR.

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THE SITUATION'S SIMILAR WITH SOYBEANS, WITH THE DAKOTAS, MINNESOTA, IOWA AND THE NATION ALL LAGGING BEHIND AVERAGES.

PLANTED WHEAT ACRES ARE A MIXED BAG, WITH NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA WELL BEHIND, BUT SOUTH DAKOTA AND MONTANA SITTING IN GOOD SHAPE SO FAR. SPRING WHEAT IS ABOUT 9-PERCENT BEHIND NATIONALLY.

SUGARBEET ACRES ARE THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE. NORTH DAKOTA HAS NOTHING PLANTED AND MINNESOTA IS AT 1%. BOTH ARE NORMALLY IN THE 30-PERCENT RANGE DURING AN AVERAGE YEAR.

LATE PLANTING IS ALSO BUMPING THE FINAL DATES FOR CROP INSURANCE COVERAGE TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT FOR SOME FARMERS. IT'S THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mike Kozojed: I'M NOT AWARE OF ANY ACRES THAT HAVE ACTUALLY GONE IN. I DON'T THINK ANYBODY'S BEEN IN THE FIELD.

MIKE KOZOJED IS A FARMER AND CROP INSURANCE AGENT NEAR HILLSBORO, NORTH DAKOTA. HE THINKS FARMERS IN HIS AREA ARE A GOOD TEN DAYS FROM GETTING INTO THE FIELDS. MOST ARE JUST TOO WET AND THE SOIL IS TOO COLD. MANY FIELDS ARE COVERED WITH FLOODWATER, AND SOME EVEN STILL HAVE SNOW.

Mike Kozojed: WE'RE STARTING TO GET CONCERNED ABOUT HOW LATE IT IS OBVIOUSLY. WE'VE GOT SUPER SATURATED SOILS.

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IF MORE RAIN FALLS AND PLANTING CONTINUES TO BE DELAYED, SOME FARMERS MIGHT START THINKING ABOUT WHETHER PREVENTED PLANT IS A VIABLE OPTION. THAT DECISION WILL BE MORE COMPLICATED THIS YEAR FOR CORN GROWERS, BECAUSE THE PRICE IS MUCH HIGHER THAN IT WAS WHEN IT WAS SET IN FEBRUARY AT $5.90. IN NORTH DAKOTA, THE FINAL DATE FOR MOST COUNTIES FOR CORN PLANTING IS MAY 25TH. SO KOZOJED SAYS FARMERS ARE GOING TO HAVE TO DO SOME MATH.

Mike Kozojed: IS IT STILL A BETTER BET TO GET SOME SEED IN THE GROUND, AND EVEN A TEN PERCENT OR A FIFTEEN PERCENT REDUCED CROP? WILL THAT MAKE YOU MORE MONEY? AND I THINK THAT'S WHAT FARMERS ARE GOING TO HAVE TO REALLY CALCULATE THIS YEAR, AND COMPARE THAT TO WHAT THEY GET ON THEIR PREVENT PLANT PROVISION.

Harrison Weber: I THINK THERE'S SOME ANXIETY OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE.

HARRISON WEBER IS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE RED RIVER VALLEY SUGARBEET GROWERS ASSOCIATION. SUGARBEETS DON'T FALL INTO THE PREVENTED PLANT PROGRAM. THE AVERAGE PLANTING START DATE IS MAY FIFTH, AND NOTHING'S BEEN PLANTED YET, BUT WEBER SAYS THEY'RE TRYING TO STAY OPTIMISTIC.

Harrison Weber: WE'VE HAD THIRTY TON BEETS PLANTED IN APRIL, AND WE'VE HAD YOU KNOW, NICE BIG CROPS PLANTED ON THE FIRST COUPLE DAYS OF JUNE YET. ANDSO THERE'S OPPORTUNITY.

WARMING WEATHER MEANS FARMERS WILL LIKELY START GETTING INTO FIELDS NEXT WEEK, BUT EVEN IF THE FIELDS ARE READY, IN SOME PLACES ROADS LEADING TO THEM MAY NOT BE ACCESSIBLE BECAUSE OF FLOODING.

Harrison Weber: CERTAINLY COULD DELAY GUYS. MAYBE THEY'LL HAVE TO GO 3-4 MILES TO GO AROUND A SECTION TO GET TO THEIR QUARTER OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. BUT WE'VE BEEN HERE BEFORE, AND IT PROBABLY WON'T BE THE LAST LATE SPRING THAT WE'LL EXPERIENCE.

YOU CAN READ MORE ON OUR COVER STORY IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

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GRAIN AND INPUT PRICES WERE HIGH EVEN BEFORE THE RUSSIAN INVASION OF UKRAINE. BUT THE UNCERTAINTY IT ADDS WILL LIKELY KEEP PRICES HIGH, FOR AT LEAST A YEAR. THAT'S ACCORDING TO A PROMINENT AG ECONOMIST AND TRADE EXPERT MIKKEL PATES TALKED TO RECENTLY IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

Mikkel Pates: EMILY, THE BIG TOPIC AT THE NORTH AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISTS ORGANIZATION IS INPUT COSTS AND MARKET VOLATILITY, ESPECIALLY REGARDING RUSSIA AND UKRAINE.

Joe Glauber: THE THING PEOPLE FORGET ABOUT IS, TWENTY YEARS AGO, THESE COUNTRIES, UKRAINE AND RUSSIA WERE NET IMPORTERS OF WHEAT. YOU KNOW.THIS AS ALL TRANSFORMED OVER THE LAST TWENTY YEARS. SO EGYPT AND OTHER COUNTRIES THAT DEPEND ON THEM, THEY'LL FIND OTHER SUPPLIERS. WE'RE NOT GOING TO RUN OUT OF WHEAT. BUT WE'RE SEEING WHAT THE IMPACTS ARE. PRICES ARE UP 25 PERCENT FROM WHAT THEY WERE PRE-WAR LEVELS. AND AGAIN, THEY WERE ALREADY VERY, VERY HIGH.

GLAUBER SAYS IT'S UNLIKELY GRAIN PRICES WILL COME DOWN BEFORE THE SUMMER OF 2023, AND IT COULD BE 2024 BEFORE MARKETS RETURN TO PRE-INVASION LEVELS.

A CONTROVERSIAL SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANT IS A STEP CLOSER TO REALITY. THE CASSELTON CITY COUNCIL APPROVED THE PLANT THIS WEEK, DESPITE OPPOSITION FROM SOME NEIGHBORS.

JEFF BEACH WAS AT THE MEETING, WHERE THEY VOICED THEIR CONCERNS.

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS ARE BUILDING THE PLANT. CONSTRUCTION ON THE $400 MILLION PROJECT WILL LIKELY START THIS SUMMER, DESPITE FEARS IT WILL CAUSE PROBLEMS FOR RESIDENTS, AND THE NEARBY THARALDSON ETHANOL PLANT.

Kirk Johnson: DO WE WANT TO LIVE IN AN INDUSTRIAL PARK, OR DO WE WANT TO LIVE IN A COMMUNITY? OF COURSE WE CHOOSE COMMUNITY EVERY TIME.

SEVERAL CASSELTON-AREA RESIDENTS TURNED OUT FOR THE CITY COUNCIL MEETING, EXPRESSING CONCERNS LIKE INCREASED POLLUTION, NOISE AND HEAVY TRUCK TRAFFIC, FROM A PLANT SO CLOSE TO TOWN.

Cassandra Grenz: DOES IT NEED TO BE RUSHED TONIGHT? CAN WE MAKE EVERYBODY JUST A LITTLE HAPPIER, STILL GET IT AND MOVE IT OUTSIDE THE TOWN JUST A LITTLE BIT?

FORMER EMT GREG KEMPEL SAYS HE'S CONCERNED ABOUT PUBLIC SAFETY.

Greg Kempel: I'M APPALLED THAT WE ARE NOT LOOKING AT MOVING THIS THREE MILES OUT OF TOWN, WHERE FARMERS ARE WILLING TO SWAP LAND. WE SHOULDN'T BE SEEING THE PUBLIC SUFFER HERE.

STEVE O'NAN, PRESIDENT OF THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS, SAYS THEY'VE TRIED TO ADDRESS RESIDENTS' CONCERNS. HE SAYS THEY WANT TO BE GOOD FOR THE COMMUNITY, AND IT'S A GROWING OPPORTUNITY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS. HE SAYS THE CHOSEN SITE HAS THE NEEDED RAIL ACCESS AND CANNOT BE MOVED.

Steve O'Nan: WE'RE HERE TODAY ASKING FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT, AND FOR THE OPPORTUNITY THAT THIS PROJECT IS GOING TO BRING FOR THE CITY OF CASSELTON.

COUNCIL MEMBER JOAN CARVELL SAYS THE PUBLIC HAS HAD MANY OPPORTUNITIES TO SPEAK UP.

Joan Carvell: THERE WERE FOUR INFORMATION MEETINGS AND I STAYED AFTER EVERY MEETING. NOT ONE CITIZEN WHO OPPOSED THIS CAME AND TALKED TO ME.

NOT EVERYONE IS OPPOSED TO THE PLANT. SOME SAY BENEFITS TO THE COMMUNITY WILL FAR OUTWEIGH THE NEGATIVES.

Joann Seifert: I SUPPORT THE CRUSH PLANT AND THE LEGACY IT WILL BUILD AND THE FUTURE GROWTH AND PROSPERITY FOR CASSELTON.

THE PLANT IS OUTSIDE THE CASSELTON CITY LIMITS, BUT AS PART OF AN AGREEMENT APPROVED BY THE COUNCIL, NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS WILL GIVE THE CITY $100,000 A YEAR FOR 15 YEARS IN EXCHANGE FOR NOT BEING ANNEXED.

ONLY ONE COUNCIL MEMBER VOTED AGAINST THE PLANT.

THANKS JEFF.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV... THE GRAND FARM GETS A NEW HOME, THAT WILL ALLOW FOR AG INNOVATION EXPANSION.

FOR HOME DELIVERY OF AGWEEK LOG ON TO AGWEEK.COM OR CALL 800-811-2580.

THE GROUND-BREAKING "GRAND FARM" IS GETTING A NEW HOME. THE FARM WAS STARTED IN 2019, AS A PLACE FOR AG INNOVATION. MIKKEL PATES EXPLAINS WHAT THE MOVE MEANS FOR ITS GROWTH.

Mikkel Pates Standup: GRAND FARM, WHICH WAS STARTED SOUTH OF FARGO, IS MOVING TO CASSELTON, NORTH DAKOTA, BECAUSE OF ITS COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS AND ITS VISIBILITY.

Brian Carroll: WE NEEDED MORE LAND, SO AT THE GRAND FORM TEST SITE, WHICH IS FANTASTIC, SO WE LOOKED FOR A PLACE WHERE WE COULD BUILD A BIG VISION AROUND IT.

BRIAN CARROLL IS DIRECTOR OF THE GRAND FARM. IT STARTED ON FORTY ACRES SOUTH OF FARGO, DEDICATED TO DEVELOPING AUTONOMOUS, HIGH-TECH AGRICULTURE. BUT IT WAS TEMPORARY. THE NEW SITE IS 150 ACRES, AND THAT WILL HOUSE PERMANENT BUILDINGS DESIGNED FOR AG INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION.

Brian Carroll: SO WE WERE LOOKING FOR LOCATIONS THAT WERE CLOSE TO THE INTERSTATE, SO THAT THE GRAND FARM COULD BE VISIBLE TO PEOPLE THAT ARE COMING INTO THE REGION. AND SO THAT WAS ONE OF THE CRITERIA THAT WE IDENTIFIED, ALONG WITH THE INFRASTRUCTURE AS WELL. WE WANT TO HAVE A PLACE THAT'S ACCESSIBLE FROM THE INTERSTATE, OFF THE ROAD, TO BRING WATER AND POWER OUT THERE.

CASSELTON IS ALREADY HOME TO SEVERAL AGRI-BUSINESSES, INCLUDING A MAJOR ETHANOL PLANT, AND A PLANNED SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANT. THE COMMUNITY'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR SAYS THE GRAND FARM CAN ONLY ATTRACT VISITORS AND MORE INNOVATIVE AG BUSINESSES.

Melissa Beach: THERE IS A POTENTIAL CERTAINLY TO BUILD OUT AROUND THE GRAND FARM, AND YOU KNOW, COMPANIES AND PARTNERS THAT ARE EXPECTING TO DO A LOT OF BUSINESS HERE AND PARTICIPATE IN THEIR EVENTS, WE CAN CERTAINLY SEE THEM LOCATING YOU KNOW, EITHER IN CASSELTON OR AROUND THE REGION.

NORTH DAKOTA'S LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR SAYS THE MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR GRAND FARM INITIATIVE WILL BE RIGHT AT HOME ON SOME OF THE REGION'S RICHEST FARMLAND, IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF THE REGION'S FIRST BONANZA FARMS. AND CLOSE TO SOME OF THE NATION'S MOST ADVANCED AG AND U-A-V RESEARCH AT NDSU AND UND.

Brent Sanford: THE FUTURE IS FARMING WITH MORE AND MORE AUTONOMY IS UPON IS, IT'S COMING. SO WHY NOT HAVE THAT INNOVATION HAPPENING HERE?

Mikkel Pates: SO A COMMUNITY THAT HAS A UNIQUE SPOT IN NORTH DAKOTA'S EARLY COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE NOW HAS A SPOT IN ITS FUTURE. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT CASSELTON, NORTH DAKOTA

CONSTRUCTION OF THE GRAND FARM IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN AT THE END OF THE YEAR.

A NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR WAS RECENTLY GRANTED $450,000 FOR HIS AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH

BARNEY GEDDES' RESEARCH IS FOCUSED ON HOW MICROBES CAN HELP CERTAIN CROPS GROW BETTER AND BOOST YIELDS. THE MICROBES HE WORKS WITH ACT AS A NATURAL NITROGEN SOURCE, WHICH IS A FERTILIZER THAT MANY CROPS NEED TO HELP WITH OVERALL YIELD. GEDDES HOPES HIS RESEARCH WILL EVENTUALLY HELP FARMERS LOWER THEIR INPUT COSTS.

Barney Geddes: THAT'S REALLY OUR MAIN MOTIVATION HERE. I GREW UP ON A SMALL FAMILY FARM AS WELL AND I CAN SEE FERTILIZERS ARE BECOMING THE MAIN INPUTS IN MOST FARMERS' AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS. SO THIS IS BECOMING MORE AND MORE EXPENSIVE, THE WAR IN UKRAINE HAS EVEN MADE IT MORE EXPENSIVE FOR FERTILIZERS EVEN YET. SO THEY'RE WELL OVER DOUBLE WHAT THEY WERE LAST YEAR.

GEDDES RECEIVED THE NEW INNOVATOR IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AWARD AND GRANT FROM THE FOUNDATION FOR FOOD & AGRICULTURE RESEARCH.

A FARM IN SOUTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA HAS HAD SUFFOLK SHEEP FOR DECADES. BUT A COUPLE YEARS AGO, THEY DECIDED TO DIVERSIFY THEIR OPERATION.

I VISITED WOLFF'S SUFFOLKS IN OAKES, TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THEIR UNIQUE BUSINESS VENTURE.

Ron Wolff: BEEN IN THE SUFFOLK BUSINESS FOR OVER FORTY-SOME YEARS.

RON WOLFF GREW UP ON HIS FAMILY'S FARM RIGHT OUTSIDE OF OAKES, NORTH DAKOTA. HE AND HIS FATHER WORKED TOGETHER ON THE OPERATION. NOW, THE NEXT GENERATION IS GETTING INVOLVED TOO.

Ron Wolff: I was a partner with my dad for many years. My dad is actually still alive, but my little daughters bought his ewes out now. So we've been a family affair.

THE WOLFFS RUN ABOUT 60 COMMERCIAL EWES ON THEIR FARM AND SELL THEIR OFFSPRING TO 4-H MEMBERS AND OTHER BREEDERS. BUT FIVE YEARS AGO, THEY BEGAN BUTCHERING THEIR LAMBS THAT THEY DIDN'T SELL AND MARKETING THEM DIRECTLY TO CONSUMERS.

Ron Wolff: Proud to say that we have not gone to the sale barn with lambs in the last three years.

So here's some of our lamb with our own label.

THE WOLFFS BUTCHER ABOUT 40 HEAD A YEAR AND SELL THEIR PRODUCT DIRECTLY OFF THE FARM AND AT THE RED RIVER FARMERS MARKET IN FARGO.

Casey Absey: I met him at the farmers market and talked to him and Beth and thought they were really cool and they started bringing in ground lamb for me and then we've tried a few other cuts for things.

CASEY ABSEY IS THE OWNER OF BLACKBIRD WOODFIRE PIZZA IN DOWNTOWN FARGO. THEY USE FRESH INGREDIENTS ON THEIR PIZZAS AND THEIR OTHER DISHES WHENEVER THEY CAN. ABSEY BELIEVES IT'S IMPORTANT TO SOURCE LOCALLY WHEN POSSIBLE.

Casey Absey: I think it's important to use all you can from around here because we are such a rich farming community.

ABSEY FEELS HIS CUSTOMERS ENJOY EATING LOCAL AND KNOWING WHERE THEIR FOOD COMES DIRECTLY.

Casey Absey: Most of them appreciate that it comes from Ron's Farm.

Ron Wolff: They like the fact that they know where it comes from.

WOLFF IS ALSO ON THE NORTH DAKOTA LAMB AND WOOL PRODUCERS BOARD

STILL AHEAD, A MINNESOTA FFA CHAPTER TAKES NATIONAL HONORS FOR ITS WORK ON MENTAL HEALTH.

THE HEAVY RAINFALL IS MAKING MANY PEOPLE WONDER IF DRIER, WARMER WEATHER COULD BE ON THE HORIZON.

HERE'S JARED WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

CHATFIELD, MINNESOTA FFA STUDENTS ARE BECOMING KNOWN FOR THEIR WORK ON MENTAL HEALTH.

THE CHAPTER PLACED THIRD IN THE NATIONAL CHAPTER AWARD PROGRAM, FOR ITS "BREAK THE STIGMA" CHALLENGE.

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THREE YEARS, THE MINNESOTA FFA CONVENTION WAS BACK IN PERSON. NEARLY FIVE THOUSAND STUDENTS GATHERED IN MINNEAPOLIS, TO TAKE PART IN LEARNING SESSIONS, WORKSHOPS AND COMPETITIONS. A VERY IMPORTANT ISSUE TOOK TOP HONORS IN THE "MODELS OF INNOVATION" CATEGORY.

Lexie Hamersma: THIS YEAR WE DID THE BREAK THE STIGMA, WHICH IS SOMETHING THAT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT TO US, BECAUSE MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS IN OUR SCHOOL.

CHATFIELD STUDENTS HAVE BEEN WORKING ON THE PROGRAM FOR SEVERAL YEARS. CHAPTER ADVISOR STACY FRITZ SAYS MANY STUDENTS STRUGGLE WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES, ESPECIALLY DURING THE PANDEMIC, SO THEY KNEW IT WAS AN IMPORTANT TIME TO PUT THE PROGRAM TOGETHER,

Stacy Fritz: OUR COMMUNITY HAS HAD A COUPLE OF LOSSES RECENTLY, AND OUR STUDENTS HAVE STRUGGLED QUITE A BIT BECAUSE OF THAT, BETWEEN THAT AND THE PANDEMIC. SO IT WAS AN IMPORTANT TIME TO PUT THAT TOGETHER.

IT'S PROGRAMS LIKE THIS THAT HAVE HELPED THEM BECOME A 3-STAR CHAPTER AT NATIONALS FOUR YEARS IN A ROW.

Sydney Allen: FFA HAS BEEN A BIG PART OF MY LIFE SKINCE MY FRESHMAN YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL. THAT I'VE BECOME SO INVOLVED OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS, IT'S BECOME LIKE A SECOND LIFE TO ME.

THIS WAS MINNESOTA'S 93RD FFA CONVENTION. THE STATE HAS 15,000 STUDENT MEMBERS, THAT'S THE HIGHEST NUMBER SINCE THE 1980'S.

COMING UP, A CONSERVATION GROUP IS HONORED FOR ITS WORK PRESERVING BIRD HABITATS.

A NORTH DAKOTA NON-PROFIT HAS BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR ITS CONSERVATION EFFORTS.

AUDUBON NORTH DAKOTA RECEIVED THE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARD FROM THE RIVER KEEPERS, FOR THEIR URBAN-WOODS AND PRAIRIE INITIATIVE IN THE FARGO-MOORHEAD COMMUNITY.

THE INITIATIVE WAS FOUNDED IN 2014, TO INCREASE BIRD HABITAT ALONG THE RED RIVER

Sarah Hewitt: Through that effort we are restoring habitat. So prairie acres and then woodland acres as well, for the benefit of our urban birds, pollinators, wildlife. Restoring ecological services, like flood resiliency, which is obviously very important here in the Red River.

THE PUBLIC IS WELCOME TO AUDUBON DAKOTA'S BIRDING FESTIVAL SATURDAY MAY 14TH, AT FOREST RIVER NATURE PARK IN FARGO.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A VETERAN HEMP FARMER IN MINNESOTA TALKS ABOUT GETTING BEGINNING HEMP FARMERS STARTED, AND CHALLENGES THAT COME WITH THE CROP.

AND A RETIRED NDSU WEED SCIENTIST HAS BEEN HONORED BY THE WESTERN SOCIETY OF WEED SCIENCE.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. SEE YOU NEXT WEEK.

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