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AgweekTV Full Show: Planting progress, blizzard impact, potato planting, Bill Gates buys farmland

This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

IT'S BEEN A RECORD SLOW SPRING OF PLANTING IN MUCH OF NORTH DAKOTA DUE TO MOTHER NATURE.

TO GET AN IN-DEPTH PERSPECTIVE ON PLANTING PROGRESS AND ACREAGE DECISIONS, AGWEEK TEAMED UP WITH RED RIVER FARM NETWORK AND ADVANCE TRADING FOR AN EARLY JUNE, "BOOTS ON THE GROUND" TOUR UP AND DOWN OUR REGION.

Don Wick: This is Don Wick from the Red River Farm Network along with Tommy Grisafi from Advance Trading. AND THIS PAST WEEK WE WERE ON THE ROAD FOR THE BOOTS ON THE GROUND TOUR, AS WE WE'VE BEEN SURVEYING CROP CONDITIONS, TALKING ABOUT PLANTING PROGRESS WITH GROWERS UP AND DOWN THE REGION. WE'RE GOING TO TALK TO A FEW OF THOSE FARMERS RIGHT NOW.

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Matt Pueppke: IT'S BEEN HARD. WE'VE DEALT WITH A LOT OF RAIN, COLD TEMPERATURES, HASN'T DRIED OUT AS MUCH AS IT USUALLY DOES. LUCKILY WE HAD SOME FERTILIZER ON LAST FALL THAT'S HELPED US OUT THIS SPRING. BUT YEAH, WE'RE QUITE A BIT, WE FINISHED AROUND THE 16TH OF MAY LAST YEAR AND OBVIOUSLY HERE WE ARE NOW, SO.

Brent Kohls: IT'S BEEN A CHALLENGE. WE WERE SHOOTING FOR ABOUT TWO THOUSAND ACRES OF CORN BUT DIDN'T QUITE GET ALL OF THAT IN. ABOUT MAYBE TEN PERCENT LESS CORN THAN WHAT WE THOUGHT WE WERE GOING TO GET IN. THROUGH HERE WE'RE PROBABLY THINKING SOMEWHERE IN THAT EIGHTY PERCENT OF THE CORN THAT WAS PLANNED KIND OF WENT IN. OBVIOUSLY NOT ON ALL THE FIELDS THAT IT WAS PLANNED ON. THERE PROBABLY GOT TO BE A LITTLE BIT OF CORN ON CORN IN SOME CERTAIN FIELDS THAT WERE TILED AND DRIED OFF AND ET CETERA.

THE QUESTION ALWAYS SEEMS TO BE HOW MUCH PP WE'RE GOING TO BE SEEING IN THIS FOOTPRINT. WHAT DO YOU SEE ON HONG FARMS?

Chris Hong: WE'RE GOING TO HAVE A COUPLE QUARTERS, PROBABLY 400 ACRES MAYBE. OTHER THAN THAT WE'RE GOING TO TRY AND GET EVERYTHING IN. YOU KNOW, THE MAJORITY OF WHAT WE'VE GOT LEFT TO PLANT IS EDIBLE BEANS SO I MEAN WE'RE IN THAT TIME FRAME.

Brent Kohls: SURPRISING IN TALKING TO THE ELEVATOR MANAGER, THEY DID GO THROUGH QUITE A BIT OF WHEAT. WITH THE MARKET PRICES WHERE THEY WERE AT, DID ENTICE A LOT OF WHEAT ACRES LAST WEEK TOO, SO I THINK WE'LL SEE A LITTLE REDUCTION IN OUR BEANS.

BACK WITH TOMMY, TOMMY GIVE ME IDEA FROM YOUR PERSPECTIVE WHAT DID WE SEE THIS PAST WEEK?

Tommy Grisafi: DON THE MOST AMAZING THING IS HOW THIS GROUND IS JUST WORKING UP BEAUTIFULLY BUT IS IT TOO LITTLE TOO LATE? MEETING WITH THIS FARMER HERE, THEY MOVED THEIR CORN DOWN FROM 92 TO 88. THEY'RE ALL THE WAY DOWN TO AN EIGHTY DAY HYBRID, SO YES, THE CORN'S GOING IN, BUT THE YIELD DRAG'S GOING TO BE THERE. THAT'S NOT SOMETHING WE'LL SEE UNTIL HARVEST, MAY NOT COME OUT UNTIL THE JANUARY CROP REPORT. SO IT MAY LOOK LIKE A LOT MORE ACRES GET PLANTED.

Don: Thank you, Tommy Grisafi from Advance Trading. Reporting for Agweek, I'm Don Wick with the Red River Farm Network.

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ERRATIC WEATHER, RISING PRICES, AND CHANGING REGULATIONS ARE ALTERING THE CALENDAR FOR CROP SPRAYING THIS YEAR.

FOR MOST GROWERS AROUND THE REGION, PLANTING GOT OFF TO A LATE START. THAT MEANS SPRAYING IS LATE, TOO.

MATT HOVDENES HAS AN AG SPRAY BUSINESS AT CASSELTON, NORTH DAKOTA. HE SAYS FIELD CONDITIONS VARY WIDELY IN HIS AREA. SOME FARMERS GOT THEIR PLANTING DONE, WHILE OTHERS HAVE BEEN STRUGGLING TO EVEN GET STARTED. AND HE SAYS IF IT STAYS WET, HE EXPECTS TO SEE SOME PREVENTED PLANTING ACRES THAT WILL STILL NEED HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS.

Matt Hovdenes: I WOULD RATHER SPRAY FUNGICIDE ON A CUSTOMER'S GROWING CROP THAT THEY'RE GOING TO MAKE REVENUE OFF OF THAN GO OUT AND TRY AND KEEP WEEDS OUT OF A PREVENTED PLANT FIELD. SO YOU KNOW, IT'S HARD TO SAY WHAT THAT WILL DO TO MY BUSINESS, BUT CERTAINLY WE LIKE TO SEE CROPS RATHER THAN PREVENTED PLANT ACRES.

SOME GROWERS WITH LATE-PLANTED SOYBEANS ARE UP AGAINST A JUNE 12TH CUTOFF DATE TO USE DICAMBA, UNDER SPRAYING REGULATIONS UPDATED THIS YEAR IN MINNESOTA.

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IT'S BEEN TWO MONTHS SINCE THE SEVERE APRIL BLIZZARD DUMPED HEAVY SNOWS OVER MUCH OF NORTH DAKOTA. TWENTY-ONE HUNDRED CATTLE PRODUCERS IN THE STATE REPORT SOME LOSSES. AG GROUPS ARE WORKING TO UPGRADE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT COMPENSATION LEVELS THAT PAY FOR PART OF THEIR LOSS.

MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Dustin Froelich: PROBABLY THE LARGEST LOSS THAT I HEARD, THEY'RE PUSHING CLOSE TO 300.

Mikkel Pates: THE DEATH LOSSES FOR COWS AND CALVES WAS BAD ENOUGH, BUT THERE'S ALSO ONGOING HEALTH CONCERNS. AND IT THROWS OF TIMING FOR EVERYTHING ELSE ON THE FARM.

Greg Maier: WHEN THIS STORM HIT WE WERE PRETTY MUCH IN THE MIDDLE OF CALVING.

GREG MAIER AND HIS FAMILY HAVE A 320-COW COMMERCIAL BEEF HERD. THE FIRST MULTI-DAY STORM WAS FOLLOWED BY ANOTHER, A FEW DAYS LATER, AND THEN BY ICY RAIN AND WINDS. SOME PRODUCERS TO THE EAST WERE HIT WITH A THIRD WEEKEND BLIZZARD. SINCE THE MAIERS KNEW THE SNOW WAS COMING, THEY HAD TIME TO PUT UP A TWENTY-ACRE ENCLOSURE IN THEIR CALVING PASTURE, USING AN EARTHEN WINDBREAK, PORTABLE PANELS AND BARBED WIRE. GREG'S DAUGHTER , LACEY -- ONE OF THE FAMILY RANCH PARTNERS - SPENT A COUPLE OF NIGHTS IN A PICKUP TRUCK, KEEPING WATCH.

Lacey Maier: WE HAD TO STAY OUT THERE CONSTANTLY AND MAKE SURE YOU KNOW EVERYTHING WAS GETTING PULLED INTO THE BARN, PUT IN A WARMER. IT WAS TOUGH.

DESPITE THEIR BEST EFFORTS, THE MAIERS LOST NEARLY FORTY CALVES IN THE STORM AND WIND AFTERMATH. THEY AND OTHERS IN THE REGION LOST ANIMALS TO PNEUMONIA AND SCOURS THAT CAME AFTER THE STORM.

Julie Ellingson: AND REALLY THAT'S A LOT OF THE LOSSES THAT WE SEE, COME IN THAT FORM, JUST AS MUCH AS THINGS THAT YOU KNOW ARE CATASTROPHIC, THAT HAPPEN RIGHT IN THE HEART OF THE WEATHER EVENT ITSELF.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STOCKMEN'S ASSOCIATION, AND OTHER FARM GROUPS AND ADVOCATES, ARE PUSHING TO NEARLY TRIPLE COMPENSATION FORMULAS UNDER THE LIVESTOCK INDEMNITY PROGRAM, WHICH WOULD STILL ONLY PARTIALLY COMPENSATE RANCHERS FOR ABOVE-NORMAL CATTLE LOSSES. THE STATE FSA OFFICE IS WORKING TO MAKE SURE DEATHS FROM STORM-RELATED DISEASES COUNT. DESPITE THE CHALLENGES, THERE'S STILL OPTIMISM.

Matt Dahlke: THIS IS ONE OF THE FIRST YEARS THERE'S BEEN A LITTLE BIT OF TALK OF SOME EXPANSIONS AGAIN BECAUSE WE ARE SEEING SOME GREEN GRASS EARLY IN THE SPRING, WHICH ALWAYS LEADS TO OPTIMISM IN THE RANCHING WORLD.

WHILE THE STORMS CLAIMED CATTLE, AND PUT PLANTING BEHIND, GREG MAIER, FOR ONE, IS TRYING TO LOOK ON THE BRIGHT SIDE.

Greg Maier: THIS MOISTURE IS A BLESSING IN DISGUISE. IT'S TOO BAD WE HAD TO GIVE UP SO MANY CALVES TO GET THIS RAIN, BUT IF THAT'S WHAT IT TAKES, THAT'S WHAT IT IS.

Mikkel Pates: IT'LL BE 2023 BEFORE FEDERAL OFFICIALS COUNT UP ALL THE LOSSES, AND IT REMAINS TO BE SEEN WHETHER THE COMPENSATION WILL BE FAIR. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STOCKMEN'S ASSOCIATION HAS LAUNCHED A DISASTER RELIEF FUND TO GET HELP TO RANCHERS.

YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

A TRUST ASSOCIATED WITH BILLIONAIRE BILL GATES NOW OWNS MORE THAN TWO THOUSAND ACRES OF FARMLAND IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA.

CAMPBELL FARMS OF GRAFTON, MADE UP OF FARMER AND FORMER REPUBLICAN STATE SENATOR TOM CAMPBELL AND HIS BROTHERS BILL AND GREG, TRANSFERRED LAND TO A TRUST CONNECTED TO GATES FOR THIRTEEN POINT FIVE MILLION DOLLARS. THE CAMPBELL BROTHERS HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN POTATO FARMING SINCE THE LATE SEVENTIES. THEY ALSO HAVE FARMLAND WEST OF MINNEAPOLIS, AND HAVE OTHER BUSINESS INTERESTS. GATES HAS A LARGE PORTFOLIO OF FARMLAND AROUND THE COUNTRY.

CAMBELL AND HIS BROTHERS DID NOT RESPOND TO AGWEEK'S REQUEST FOR COMMENT.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL MEET A YOUNG FARMER WE'LL BE FOLLOWING THIS SEASON, ALTHOUGH FARMING WASN'T HIS FIRST CHOICE.

THE GREEN BISON SOY PROCESSING FACILITY IS A STEP CLOSER TO REALITY.

A GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONY WAS HELD FOR THE PLANT LAST WEEK. GREEN BISON SOY PROCESSING IS A VENTURE BETWEEN A-D-M AND MARATHON PETROLEUM.

THE 350 MILLION DOLLAR SOYBEAN PROCESSING FACILITY IS LOCATED ABOUT TEN MILES EAST OF JAMESTOWN. IT'S NORTH DAKOTA'S FIRST DEDICATED SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANT AND REFINERY.

IT'S EXPECTED TO PROCESS 150-THOUSAND BUSHELS OF SOYBEANS A DAY INTO OIL, MEAL AND FIBER. AN ESTIMATED 600 MILLION POUNDS OF VEGETABLE OIL A YEAR WILL BE SENT TO THE MARATHON REFINERY IN DICKINSON, NORTH DAKOTA, TO BE REFINED INTO RENEWABLE DIESEL.

Sen. John Hoeven: THAT'S CALLED LEADING THE WAY FORWARD WITH AN INNOVATIVE PRODUCT AND PLANT AND BUSINESS OTHER PLACES DON'T HAVE.

THE PLANT IS EXPECTED TO EMPLOY SEVENTY PEOPLE, AND BE RUNNING BY THE 2023 HARVEST.

THROUGHOUT THIS GROWING SEASON, AGWEEK IS FOLLOWING SEVERAL FARMERS IN OUR REGION. WE CALL IT OUR "FOLLOW A FARMER" SERIES.

THIS WEEK, AGWEEK PUBLISHER KATIE PINKE INTRODUCES US TO HER FARMER, FROM NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA...

Katie: THANKS EMILY. I'M HERE WITH THOMAS SHEPHARD OF CRYSTAL, NORTH DAKOTA ON OUR FOLLOW A FARMER SERIES. THOMAS, JUST TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HOW MANY YEARS YOU'VE BEEN FARMING, AND THEN SHARE WHERE WE ARE.

Thomas Shephard: SURE, SO WE'RE OUTSIDE OF CRYSTAL, NORTH DAKOTA. I'VE BEEN FARMING NOW SINCE I GOT HOME FROM COLLEGE, SO IN 2015, SO IT'S BEEN SEVEN YEARS NOW. AND YEAH WE ARE LOCATED ABOUT A HALF HOUR FROM CANADA AND A HALF HOUR FROM MINNESOTA. I'M A FIFTH GENERATION FARMER. WE'VE GROWN POTATOES SINCE THE 1930'S. SPECIALIZE IN CHIPPING POTATOES.

WHAT OTHER CROPS ARE YOU RAISING HERE?

Thomas Shephard: WHEAT, CORN, SOYBEANS AND EDIBLE BEANS. KIND OF EVERYTHING REVOLVES AROUND THE POTATO.

AND YOU'VE SEEN A DRASTIC PLANTING SEASON, SO SHARE A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE PLANTING SEASON.

Thomas Shephard: YEAH, SO WE ARE WELL INTO JUNE HERE, AND WE JUST HIT THE HALFWAY POINT PLANTING POTATOES. AND USUALLY THIS TIME OF YEAR WE'VE BEEN DONE FOR WEEKS, BUT WE JUST KIND OF ROLL WITH THE PUNCHES AND DO WHAT WE CAN.

DID YOU GROW UP WANTING TO FARM?

Thomas Shephard: AH, THAT'S A GREAT QUESTION, AND IF I'M ANSWERING HONESTLY, I DID NOT. FOR A LONG TIME I THOUGHT ABOUT BEING A PASTOR. YOU KNOW, THE FAMILY FARM, IT'S BEEN IN THE FAMILY SO LONG, I WAS THE ONLY BOY, SO I KIND OF KNEW SINCE I WAS YOUNG THAT, YOU KNOW, MY PARENTS AND EVERYONE WOULD WANT ME TO KEEP FARMING, AND I FELT THAT PRESSURE AND I DIDN'T LIKE IT, AND I KIND OF JUST THOUGHT, YOU KNOW, I WANT TO DO MY OWN THING. BUT THEN, WHEN WHEN I WAS GONE AND WHEN I GOT TO SEE THE WORLD A LITTLE BIT MORE, I REALIZED JUST HOW BEAUTIFUL OF A THING WE HAVE HERE BACK AT THE FARM. AND MY FAVORITE THING ABOUT FARMING IS WHO I GET TO DO IT WITH, THAT WOULD BE MY DAD. AND I GUESS IT'S JUST A LEGACY I'M HONORED TO BE A PART OF.

Katie: THOMAS SHEPARD, THANKS SO MUCH FOR BEING A PART OF OUR FOLLOW A FARMER SERIES. WE'LL BE CHECKING IN HERE AT SHEPHARD FARMS SEVERAL TIMES THROUGHOUT THE GROWING SEASON.

THE APRIL STORMS WERE CHALLENGING FOR LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS ACROSS NORTH DAKOTA, BUT NOW THE BENEFITS ARE STARTING TO EMERGE.

WE PAID A VISIT TO THE BEST ANGUS AND QUARTER HORSE RANCH NEAR WATFORD CITY, IN THE NORTH DAKOTA BADLANDS, WHERE THEY'RE RECOVERING FROM THE DROUGHT AND SPRING STORMS.

Pete Best: IT'S WAY BETTER NOW. I MEAN, THIS IS AS GOOD A SPRING AS WE'VE HAD IN THE LAST TEN YEARS.

THE GRASS IS COMING BACK, SLOWLY, ON THE BEST RANCH. AFTER YEARS OF DROUGHT, RANCHER PETE BEST SAYS THEY'VE HAD EIGHT INCHES OF RAIN AND SNOW IN THE LAST MONTH OR SO. THAT'S A BIG START TOWARD PULLING THEM OUT OF DROUGHT.

Pete Best: THE GRASS IS COMING, BUT YOU CAN TELL IT'S BEEN STRESSED OVER THE LAST THREE YEARS, REALLY, WE'VE BEEN SHORT OF MOISTURE. BUT IT'S BEEN AN AWFUL SPRING FOR CALVING, BUT IT'S BEEN A GOOD SPRING FOR MOISTURE.

BEST AND HIS WIFE VAWNITA HAVE ABOUT TWENTY QUARTER HORSES AND 250 HEAD OF CATTLE. THEY SOLD OFF ABOUT FIFTY COWS LAST YEAR BECAUSE OF THE DROUGHT. STILL, THE APRIL BLIZZARDS HIT HARD.

Pete Best: WE DIDN'T DO SO BAD, BECAUSE WE DIDN'T HAVE A LOT OF COWS CALVING. WE WERE DONE WITH OUR BIGGEST BUNCHES. BUT WE STILL LOST SOME, AND I DON'T KNOW WHAT WE REALLY COULD HAVE DONE TO SAVE THEM. IT WAS TOUGH.

BEST SAYS THEY COULD STILL USE A LITTLE MORE RAIN, AND HE'S OPTIMISTIC THEY'LL GET IT.

Pete Best: ALL IT TAKES IS A COUPLE MORE RAINS AND WE'LL HAVE ALL THE HAY THAT WE NEED AND WE CAN HAVE GOOD CROPS, AND WE'LL HAVE ENOUGH GRASS. SO STATISTICALLY IF IT'S A DROUGHT OR NOT, I DON'T KNOW IF THAT MATTERS AS MUCH AS WHAT ACTUALLY GROWS.

THE RANCH IS WHERE HIS WIFE VAWNITA GREW UP. THEY BOUGHT IT FROM HER PARENTS IN 2008. PETE DIDN'T GROW UP ON A RANCH, BUT, DESPITE THE CHALLENGES, IT'S WHERE HE ALWAYS WANTED TO BE.

Pete Best: FROM AGE FIVE, YOUNGER THAN THAT. WE LIVED IN MINNEAPOLIS AT THE TIME, AND THAT'S WHAT I WANTED TO DO, I WANTED TO RANCH. I WASN'T SURE HOW, BUT IT'S WHAT I ALWAYS WANTED.

PETE AND VAWNITA BEST ALSO HAVE JOBS OFF THE RANCH IN WATFORD CITY.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE VISIT THE NORTH DAKOTA STATE FFA CONVENTION.

HOW LONG CAN THE REGION EXPECT PLEASANT TEMPERATURES?

HERE'S JARED WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

Welcome back to Agweek TV. Today, we're at the North Dakota state FFA Convention, and I'm with Nikki Fideldy-Doll. So Nikki, you recently took on a new position with North Dakota FFA organization. Do you want to go ahead and tell me a little bit about that?

Nikki Fideldy-Doll: I STARTED IN THE CLASSROOM, SO I WAS A HIGH SCHOOL AGRICULTURE EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR AND THEN STARTED AT THIS ROLE IN AUGUST. AND SO I WORKED FOR NORTH DAKOTA CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION, AND I SERVE AS STATE SUPERVISOR AND I ALSO LUCKY AM LUCKY ENOUGH TO SERVE AS THE STATE FFA ADVISOR AS WELL.

SO NIKKI YOU'RE THE FIRST WOMAN TO BE WITHIN THE ROLE OF STATE FFA ADVISOR. HOW HAS THAT EXPERIENCE BEEN FOR YOU SO FAR?

Nikki Fideldy-Doll: I THINK THAT EVERYONE LOOKS BACK TO THEIR HIGH SCHOOL AG TEACHER, AND I THINK IF MR. KEVIN NELSON WAS LISTENING TO THIS, I DON'T THINK AS A LITTLE EIGHTH GRADER I EXPECTED ME TO GET HERE, BUT REALLY IT'S HUMBLING. I MEAN, THERE'S A LOT OF GREAT WOMEN THAT HAVE PAVED THE WAY IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND FFA. AND RIGHT NOW NORTH DAKOTA HAS MORE FEMALE AG TEACHERS THAN MALE, AND THIS IS THE FIRST YEAR OF THAT AS WELL.

SO HAVE WE SEEN ANY GROWTH WITHIN NORTH DAKOTA FFA?

Nikki Fideldy-Doll: SINCE 2016 AT LEAST, WE'VE GROWN IN MEMBERSHIP, AND WE HAVE A RECORD BREAKING MEMBERSHIP OF OVER SEVEN THOUSAND STUDENTS IN NORTH DAKOTA FFA THIS YEAR, AND THAT GOES BACK TO OUR TEACHERS. AND SO WE EVEN HAD A GROWTH IN MEMBERSHIP OVER COVID, AND THAT WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT OUR ADVISORS FINDING WAYS FOR THOSE STUDENTS TO FEEL WELCOME AND ENGAGED.

Thanks for joining us today, Nikki, at the North Dakota state FFA Convention in Fargo.

STILL AHEAD, THREE FRIENDS OPEN A CHEESE PLANT IN SOUTHERN MINNESOTA, USING FRESH MILK FROM A NEARBY DAIRY FARM.

AFTER SOME CONSTRUCTION DELAYS, THE NEW CANNON BELLES CHEESE PLANT IS UP AND RUNNING.

CHEESEMAKERS JACKIE OHMANN, KATHY HUPF, AND DEEANN LUFKIN STARTED THE ARTISAN CHEESE COMPANY IN OHMANN'S KITCHEN ABOUT TEN YEARS AGO. IN 2016 THEY STARTED PRODUCING CHEESE COMMERCIALLY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA'S PILOT PLANT. THEIR NEW 58-HUNDRED SQUARE FOOT PLANT CAN TURN OUT 650 POUNDS OF CHEESE A WEEK. THEY SAY ONE REASON THEIR CHEESE IS SO GOOD IS THE HIGH-QUALITY MILK THEY GET FROM THE NEARBY SQUARE DEAL DAIRY.

Jackie Ohmann: THEIR BUTTER FAT AND PROTEINS ARE, THEY JUST HAVE A REALLY GOOD, HIGH QUALITY MILK, SO WE'RE ABLE TO GET A LOT MORE CHEESE PER POUND OF MILK, WHICH IS EXCITING.

Kathy Hupf: AND THE WHEY PRODUCT FROM OUR CHEESE IS GOING BACK TO THE FARM AND BEING FED TO THE COWS. SO IT'S REALLY A FULL CIRCLE STORY AND WE LOVE THAT.

THE WOMEN ARE PLANNING A GRAND OPENING AT THE PLANT IN MID-JULY.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE THIS WEEK ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN THE MAGAZINE.

IT'S UNCLEAR WHEN A JUDGE MIGHT RULE ON WHETHER UNITED STATES SUGAR CORP. CAN BUY "MAVERICK" IMPERIAL SUGAR.

AND POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS IN THE DAKOTAS AND MONTANA WILL RECEIVE PRECISION AG GRANTS FROM THE CHS FOUNDATION.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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