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AgweekTV Full Show: Northern Ag Expo, year-end equipment buying, Ranch House Restaurant, Hande Equine Therapy

This week on AgweekTV, we kick off the indoor farm show season in Fargo at the Northern Ag Expo, where we'll discuss grain markets and possible greenhouse gas emission regulations. Once again it's time for year-end equipment buying. We check in on a small town in North Dakota where the community is trying to save its only restaurant. And we'll profile a unique, hands-on horse therapy business in small-town North Dakota.

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, we kick off the indoor farm show season in Fargo at the Northern Ag Expo, where we'll discuss grain markets and possible greenhouse gas emission regulations. Once again it's time for year-end equipment buying. We check in on a small town in North Dakota where the community is trying to save its only restaurant. And we'll profile a unique, hands-on horse therapy business in small-town North Dakota.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV I'M EMILY BEAL. THIS WEEK WE'RE COMING TO YOU FROM THE NORTHERN AG EXPO AT THE FARGODOME, THE FIRST POST HARVEST FARM SHOW IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS.

THIS IS THE 51ST YEAR FOR THE EXPO.THE TWO DAY EVENT, PUT ON BY THE NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION, HAS ABOUT ONE-HUNDRED EXHIBITORS FOR ITS TRADE SHOW AND TYPICALLY DRAWS THREE TO FOUR THOUSAND PEOPLE. IT ALSO FEATURES EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SEMINARS, SUCH AS THE GRAIN MARKET OUTLOOK AND FARM SAFETY DEMONSTRATIONS.

One of the notable speakers at the Northern AG Expo was Mary Thomas Hart with the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. So Mary, what are some of the obstacles that cattlemen are currently facing?

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Mary-Thomas: There are a variety of obstacles. I think, you know, every year is a little different. But I think certainly rising input costs have a huge impact on farmers and ranchers across the country. Also, you know, regulatory burden, we see, you know, increasing interest and regulation from agencies like the EPA.

Emily: So a big topic to discuss was greenhouse gas emissions reporting.

Mary-Thomas: So earlier this year, we saw a proposed rule from the Securities and Exchange Commission to mandate greenhouse gas emissions reporting from publicly traded companies. Now, that proposed rule includes scope three or supply chain emissions. So that means that any beef cattle producer whose final product is being sold by a publicly traded entity could be subject to greenhouse gas emissions reporting requirements. There's currently no accurate way to calculate and report greenhouse gas emissions, especially at an on farm level. So this subjects farmers and ranchers potentially to a pretty burdensome and unachievable regulatory mandate.

Emily: So how did NCBA respond to their proposal?

Mary-Thomas: NCBA and ten other national ag associations filed some pretty substantive comments to the FCC. I think it was pretty clear with this proposal that they failed to consider the impact of this rule and this mandate to agricultural producers, in part because agriculture has never been regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. And as far as a resolution, I think that we will expect to see a final rule from the FCC in the next six months. Less clarification on whether that final rule is going to include scope three emissions. I think that they received a lot of pushback and so there will be likely some scaling down of the scope three reporting requirement.

Thanks for joining us today for some insight. Mary Thomas Heart, NCBA.

FARM SAFETY IS OFTEN A FOCUS AT THESE SHOWS. A GRAIN BIN RESCUE IN COLGATE, NORTH DAKOTA LAST MONTH, ONCE AGAIN CALLED ATTENTION TO THE IMPORTANCE OF GRAIN BIN SAFETY, AND FAST RESCUE. WHILE THE COLGATE RESCUE THANKFULLY DIDN'T RESULT IN LOSS OF LIFE, THE FARM AND RANCH SAFETY PROGRAM COORDINATOR FOR NDSU EXTENSION SAYS THAT WAS THE EXCEPTION. MOST FARM ACCIDENTS ARE TRAUMATIC, EVEN WHEN SOMEONE IS SAVED. AT THE FARM SAFETY DEMO AT THE EXPO, SHE STRESSED THE IMPORTANCE OF SHOWING EMPATHY TO COMMUNITIES INVOLVED.

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Angie Johnson: You just listening allows them to release that weight, so they're not carrying that burden of any guilt that they may have, any remorse, any regret, any fear. And that's really, really hard in our very rural, stoic communities because it's hard to admit that we were scared, it's hard to admit that you could've died in that situation, that's not easy to talk about. But the more we allow people to do that, the more we can help these communities and help these farmers and ranchers and their families heal.

SAFETY DEMOS WERE PUT ON THROUGHOUT THE EXPO BY SHEYENNE VALLEY TECHNICAL RESCUE.

A SOUTH DAKOTA FAMILY IS CELEBRATING SIXTY YEARS IN THE IMPLEMENT BUSINESS. AS MIKKEL PATES FOUND, DESPITE SOME CURRENT CHALLENGES IN THE MARKET, IT'S STILL A GOOD TIME TO BUY.

Mikkel Pates: EMILY, MANY FARMERS IN THE AREA ARE IN A STRONGER POSITION TO BUY EQUIPMENT THAN THEY THOUGHT THEY WOULD BE AT THIS POINT.

Jeff Bloom: WORKED HERE AT THE DEALERSHIP WITH MY FATHER, SPENT ALL MY YOUNG YEARS LEARNING THE BUSINESS.

THE BLOOM FAMILY HAS BEEN SELLING FARM EQUIPMENT IN SOUTH DAKOTA SINCE 1962. BROTHERS JEFF AND TOM BLOOM HAVE OWNED LAKE COUNTY INTERNATIONAL SINCE 1986. JEFF BLOOM SAYS HE'S SEEN BOTH GOOD TIMES AND TOUGH TIMES IN THE AG BUSINESS.

Jeff Bloom: I REMEMBER BUSINESS BEING GOOD IN THE SEVENTIES, BUT I CAN ALSO REMEMBER MY FATHER WRITING ME A PAYCHECK AND TELLING ME NOT TO RUN TO THE BANK AND CASH IT, BECAUSE TIMES WERE TIGHT. YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT THE EIGHTIES NOW? YEAH, RIGHT.

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THE ASSOCIATION OF EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS SAYS FARM MACHINERY SALES HAVE BEEN STRONG THIS YEAR, ESPECIALLY COMBINES. AS NEW UNIT PRICES HAVE RISEN IN RECENT YEARS, SOME FARMERS HAD BEEN HANGING ONTO OLDER EQUIPMENT, SO BLOOM SAYS THE REPAIR BUSINESS ALSO HAS BEEN GOOD. HE SAYS DESPITE INFLATION FEARS, AND HIGHER INTEREST RATES, FARMERS HAVE FINANCIAL WHEREWITHAL, BECAUSE OF RECENT STRONG CROPS, MARKET PRICES AND GOVERNMENT PAYMENTS. AND THOSE TAX BREAKS STILL GIVE SOME FARMERS A REASON TO BUY BEFORE THE END OF THE YEAR.

Jeff Bloom: THE INFLATION IS TERRIBLY SCARY, AND THE INTEREST RATES RISING, YOU KNOW, TO SEVEN AND A HALF IS SCARY, BUT IT'S STILL NOT AS BAD AS TIMES WE'VE BEEN IN BEFORE.

JOHN SCHUVER AND HIS BROTHER, JUNIOR, GROW CORN AND SOYBEANS NEAR GRANVILLE, IOWA. THEY DROVE TWO HOURS TO LAKE COUNTRY INTERNATIONAL LOOKING FOR A LOADER FOR THEIR FEEDLOT. JOHN SAYS CROP AND LAND PRICES HAVE GONE UP IN THE LAST TWO YEARS, AND HE WONDERS HOW LONG IT WILL STAY THAT WAY.

John Schuver: YOU'RE KIND OF WAITING FOR THAT HIT, YOU KNOW. THE INTEREST IS GOING UP SO THAT'S GOING TO START TAKING A TOLL. IT'S BEEN GOOD THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT THE INTEREST NOW YOU KNOW IT'S CREEPING UP.

Mikkel Pates: SO THERE'S CONCERN ABOUT INFLATION, BUT IT APPEARS THE PACE OF FARM EQUIPMENT SALES WILL REMAIN BRISK THROUGH THE END OF 2022. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.

SELF-PROPELLED COMBINES HAVE SEEN THE BIGGEST SALES INCREASE ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR THE LAST SEVERAL MONTHS. THEY GREW 77 PERCENT IN OCTOBER.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV FROM THE NORTHERN AG EXPO, WE'LL TALK TO SOME EXPERTS ABOUT THE GRAIN MARKET OUTLOOK FOR THE COMING YEAR.

WELCOME BACK TO OUR SHOW, COMING TO YOU THIS WEEK FROM THE NORTHERN AG EXPO IN FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA.

One of the main seminars at the expo was the Grain Marketing Outlook. I currently have two panelists here with me, Randy Martinson and Frayne Olsen. So guys, as we wrap up 20, 22, what were some of the surprises we saw in the grain markets?

Frayne Olson: Well, I guess to start with, when we started the spring, we were really concerned about planted acreage as well as yield potential, not only here and especially in the northern plains, but also across a pretty big part of the growing, growing region in the U.S. And obviously, the crop turned out to be a lot better than we anticipated.

Harvest went a lot smoother than I think anybody expected, especially here in the Northern Plains. And so when we look at total production numbers, they came in in kind of an average sized crop. We were right at trend line yield for corn and soybeans, a little bit below for for wheat, but again, primarily because of the winter wheat area. But we had a good production year. And the question now, of course, is where do we go on the demand side?

Randy Martinson: Yeah, I would agree with that. I mean, we were surprised that we were able to even harvest the crop and be done by the end of October with corn, especially with this late planting that we had. And it was a good crop for the most part in most of the areas. Now, we did see that, of course, the Western Corn Belt did have some production issues with the drought that kind of continued to ravage down in that area. But for the most part, you know, it was a lot better end to a year than what we were expecting.

Emily: As we look back in the year of 2022, what were some of the driving forces that really impacted the grain markets?

Frayne: A lot of it revolved around the political aspects, things outside of agriculture, rather than necessarily what was going on within agriculture.

Randy: The slowdown in China demand as well. But, you know, because of COVID not importing as much soybeans or corn, I think added a little bit to that trouble with the U.S. market. And that's we're kind of seeing that yet with our slower corn exports than we anticipated.

Emily: So as we're sitting in the last month of 2022, how are the grain markets currently looking?

Randy: Pretty decent shape. I would say that we probably have hit the holiday doldrums a little sooner than normal. We probably are going to see a quiet December. One thing is that we do know the market is going to be very reactive to any kind of special news or some event that happens, you know l like that missile strike in Poland. We saw that shot the markets up right away. So I think that's something that the market is very sensitive because of our tight stocks.

Emily: So as we head into 2023, what are some of those possible risks that producers could face?

Randy: You know, I think on the corn side, you know, it's our exports. You know, right now, our export market, however, our exports haven't been good in corn. We're running about 50% of what we were last year at this time. So I think that's going to be the biggest pitfall for corn going forward, is that it's likely USDA is going to lower our export estimates, which will increase our stocks, which that could be a little bit of a black cloud over the head of of corn going forward. And then, you know, with whether South America's production is going to fall, that will help dictate where our exports do come into play. But right now, we're trailing and we've got a it's going to be a long road to hoe to get back to normal.

Frayne: Yeah. On soybeans, kind of a similar story. We're relying very heavily, obviously, on the Chinese market to pull off a lot of the US soybeans are the most dominant buyer. The soybean buying habits right now from China are really kind of a wait and see. They are buying from the U.S. I think we'll continue to have some export sales of soybeans into the US from the US into China. However, they're really buying hand-to-mouth. They're really only filling what they need, anticipating a very large crop coming out of Brazil. And of course, once that crop starts harvest and they're able to get some of those new crop beans into the export terminals and into the facilities, I think we're going to see US export sales to China drop off very dramatically. So farmers from the soybean standpoint, have a pretty tight window to try and get the rest of their old crop marketing done, potentially get some new new crop marketing done as well into the 2023 season. So I'll be watching soybeans pretty carefully for some opportunities.

Thank you too, so much for your insight. Randy Martinson and Frayne Olson.

AN EQUINE MASSAGE THERAPIST IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA GIVES THE "HANDS ON" TREATMENT. WHILE MANY USE ELECTRONIC DEVICES ON HORSES, JAMIE HANDE PREFERS TO USE HER HANDS.

It's kind of been my whole childhood really, on horseback.

*sound of garage door opening*

Jamie Hande: I always wanted to do something with horses, but I knew I wasn't cut out for vet school.

JAMIE HANDE GREW UP WITH HORSES, SO SHE KNOWS HOW TO GET THEM TO TRUST HER. HANDE FEELS HANDS ON IS BETTER THAN MACHINES.

So like right there, she softens. Right there is a spot. She lets you know.

Jamie Hande: I THINK PEOPLE ARE THINKING THE NEXT NEW TECHNOLOGY THING IS BETTER, BUT I FEEL WITH MASSAGE, YOUR HANDS ARE ON THEM, SO NOT ONLY DO THEY TAKE YOUR ENERGY IN TO HELP HEAL, BUT YOU CAN ALSO FEEL WHERE THEY'RE TIGHT OR WHERE THEY'RE SORE OR WHERE THERE'S A PROBLEM RATHER THAN JUST THROWING A MACHINE ON THEM.

HER FACILITY IN GLEN ULLIN, NORTH DAKOTA HAS TWO LARGE POLE BARNS THAT HOUSE STALLS FOR CLIENTS HORSES, A WALKER, AN ARENA, AND THERAPY EQUIPMENT. THAT INCLUDES A 500-GALLON WATER TANK WITH A TREADMILL.

*sounds of horse running on water treadmill*

They're about sixty percent buoyant when it's full.

BUT HER MAIN FOCUS IS THE HANDS-ON MASSAGE.

Jamie Hande: YOU USUALLY START WITH A FULL BODY MASSAGE, AND THEN YOU'LL COME ACROSS ANY PLACES THAT ARE TIGHTER OR MORE SORE AND THEN YOU'LL SPEND A LITTLE MORE TIME WORKING ON THAT. FOR THE MOST PART, IF THEY'RE NOT SUPER, SUPER SORE THEY ENJOY IT, RELAX.

HANDE STARTED THE BUSINESS TEN YEARS AGO, AFTER GRADUATING FROM COLLEGE AND THEN GETTING CERTIFIED IN EQUINE MASSAGE IN MONTANA.

They usually go out in the arena and roll before they come in here, but that's so good for them to be able to get out of the stall and do that.

THE FACILITY CAN TAKE UP TO SEVEN HORSES AT A TIME. HANDE ESTIMATES SEVENTY-FIVE PERCENT OF HER CLIENTS ARE RODEO ATHLETES,

Jamie Hande: I'VE HAD STEER WRESTLING HORSES, BARREL HORSES, TEAM ROPING HORSES, CALF ROPING HORSES, I'VE PRETTY MUCH HAD EVERY EVENT.

HORSES GENERALLY STAY WITH HANDE FOR TWO WEEKS OF THERAPY.

HANDE IS ONE OF ONLY A FEW EQUINE MASSAGE THERAPISTS IN THE REGION SO CUSTOMERS COME FROM ACROSS THE DAKOTAS, MINNESOTA, NEBRASKA AND WYOMING.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, ONE SMALL TOWN IS LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO REOPEN ITS ONLY RESTAURANT.

HOW WILL DECEMBER'S WEATHER BODE FOR THE REGION?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

ONE SMALL NORTH DAKOTA TOWN HAS LOST ITS ONLY RESTAURANT, BUT PEOPLE THERE HOPE IT CAN RE-OPEN.

THE RANCH HOUSE OPENED AS A BAR IN 1937, AND LATER A RESTAURANT WAS ADDED. JERRY KELSH, AND THEN HIS SON, OWNED THE RESTAURANT IN THE 90'S, BUT IT HAS BEEN COMMUNITY-OWNED SINCE A FIRE IN 2000. LOCAL PEOPLE PITCHED IN TO RUN IT, MOSTLY WITH VOLUNTEERS. THE RANCH HOUSE HAS BEEN AN IMPORTANT COMMUNITY HUB, AND SERVED SENIOR MEALS, BUT DECLINING RURAL POPULATIONS MADE IT HARD TO STAY OPEN.

Jerry Kelsh: IT'S HEAVY ON MY HEART TO SEE IT CLOSED, FOR NOW. FOR NOW, AND I EMPHASIZE FOR NOW, BECAUSE WE'RE GOING TO DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO GET IT GOING AGAIN.

DEAN SIMEK'S DAD WAS ALSO A FORMER OWNER OF THE RESTAURANT, AND DEAN HAS BEEN ON THE RANCH HOUSE RENEWAL COMMITTEE SINCE THE FIRE. HE SAYS THE TOWN IS REALLY GOING TO MISS HAVING A PLACE TO GATHER, SO HE HOPES SOMEONE COMES FORWARD TO OPERATE IT.

Dean Simek: THE BUSINESS IS HERE, BUT YOU'VE GOT TO BRING IT BACK. WE LOST THE BUSINESS OVER THE YEARS, YOU KNOW, BUT COVID DIDN'T HELP MATTERS ANY, THE HIGH PRICE OF FOOD RIGHT NOW. BUT IT WOULD TAKE A YOUNG COUPLE IF THEY WANTED TO COME AND RUN IT, THEY COULD BRING IT BACK AND MAKE IT PROFITABLE AGAIN.

KELSH SAYS ANYONE WHO'S INTERESTED IN RUNNING THE RESTAURANT SHOULD CALL HIM.

STILL AHEAD, A MINNESOTA FARM FAMILY IS HONORED FOR ITS COMMITMENT TO CLEAN WATER.

A RURAL KILKENNY, MINNESOTA FARM HAS BEEN NAMED THE 2022 OUTSTANDING CONSERVATIONISTS FOR RICE COUNTY BY THE RICE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT.

JIRIK FAMILY FARMS IS LOCATED IN THE HEADWATERS OF THE CANON RIVER WATERSHED, WHERE WATER FLOWS INTO SEVERAL LAKES BEFORE IT FLOWS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE JIRIKS' DECISION TO CONSERVE SOIL, PREVENT EROSION AND IMPROVE WATER QUALITY POSITIVELY AFFECTS MANY DOWNSTREAM IN THE WATER SHED. THE JIRIKS INSTALLED AN AG WASTE SYSTEM IN THEIR BARNYARD THAT STORES WASTE TO PREVENT RUNOFF INTO THEIR PASTURE AND WATERS.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

MINNESOTA GROUPS ARE SETTING UP RESOURCES TO GET NEW PEOPLE INTO FARMING.

AND, NATURE ENERGY, THE DANISH COMPANY THAT'S BRINGING BIOGAS PROJECTS TO MINNESOTA AND WISCONSIN, IS BEING BOUGHT BY THE SHELL PETROLEUM CORPORATION.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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