ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

AgweekTV Full Show: North Dakota soybean crush, corn planting, ag grad, Farm Rescue

This week on AgweekTV, we'll take a closer look at the future of soybean crushing in North Dakota with two big plants on the horizon. We'll visit the southern Red River Valley, where corn planting is finally getting started. We'll begin our "Follow A Farmer" series once again, where we'll meet a 22-year-old ag engineering graduate who's beginning her career as a full-time farmer. And a well-known group that helps farmers in need is at the mercy of Mother Nature.

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, we'll take a closer look at the future of soybean crushing in North Dakota with two big plants on the horizon. We'll visit the southern Red River Valley, where corn planting is finally getting started. We'll begin our "Follow A Farmer" series once again, where we'll meet a 22-year-old ag engineering graduate who's beginning her career as a full-time farmer. And a well-known group that helps farmers in need is at the mercy of Mother Nature.

See more from AgweekTV
This week on AgweekTV, a new technology could come sweeping through ranchers' pastures. A group of farmers "lawyer up" for proper pay for using their land for the Red River Water Supply pipeline. North Dakota potatoes will soon be under the Golden Arches of McDonald's. We'll visit a grain elevator house and check out updates made since we were first there four years ago. And we profile Harvest Hope Farm's camps, which allows kids to see what farm life is like.
It's "high summer" now, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says. And that means you can expect regular heat, thunderstorms and irregular rainfall. This week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast for the next two weeks holds true to that summer pattern.
Harvest Hope Farm hosts summer camps that allow youth to experience what life is like on the farm. While it is only for a few hours a day, the little ones get to be immersed in not only the great outdoors, but agriculture as well.
The heat wave in the northern Plains won't last much beyond this weekend, but it likely will stay warm, with thunderstorms likely scattered in the region, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says on this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV.
This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

IN JUST A COUPLE OF YEARS, NORTH DAKOTA WILL GO FROM A STATE THAT EXPORTS 90% OF ITS SOYBEANS, TO PROCESSING AND ADDING VALUE TO MORE THAN HALF ITS SOYBEAN CROP.

JEFF BEACH JOINS US NOW WITH MORE ON THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

THE TRANSFORMATION WILL COME WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OF SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANTS AT SPIRITWOOD AND CASSELTON, NORTH DAKOTA.

ADVERTISEMENT

NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS IS BUILDING THE CASSELTON PLANT. IT'S A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN MINNESOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS AND CGB OUT OF LOUISIANA. CONSTRUCTION IS EXPECTED TO START THIS SUMMER. BACKERS SAY IT WILL BE GOOD FOR GROWERS, AND THE STATE.

Scott White: North Dakota is one of the top 10 soybean producing states in the United States, it is the only one that does not have a dedicated soybean processing facility built in it. So it's a great place to put a plant. And the whole idea is to add value to North Dakota produced soybeans.

THE TWO PLANTS ARE BEING BUILT IN COUNTIES THAT ARE NOT ONLY NORTH DAKOTA'S TOP SOYBEAN PRODUCERS, BUT RANK AMONG THE NATION'S TOP PRODUCING COUNTIES.

JERAMIE WELLER, THE GENERAL MANAGER OF THE MINNESOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS PLANT IN BREWSTER, SAYS MORE SOYBEAN ACRES ARE BEING PLANTED IN RESPONSE TO A GROWING INDUSTRY.

Jeramie Weller: YIELD HAS CONTINUED TO INCREASE OVER THE YEARS, AND WE EXPECT THAT SAME THING TO HAPPEN IN NORTH DAKOTA, ESPECIALLY WITH SOME DEDICATED CRUSH PLANTS THERE, THAT THERE WILL BE PLENTY OF SOYBEANS TO GO AROUND FOR ALL THESE CRUSH PLANTS THAT ARE BEING BUILT.

STUDIES SHOW GROWERS CAN EXPECT A FIVE TO TEN CENT A BUSHEL PREMIUM BECAUSE OF THE PLANTS. AT SPIRITWOOD, ADM IS PARTNERING WITH MARATHON PETROLEUM TO CONVERT THE FORMER CARGILL MALT PLANT

INTO THE STATE'S FIRST DEDICATED SOYBEAN PROCESSING PLANT.

IT'S CERTAINLY AN EXCITING TIME FOR THE STATE. THANKS JEFF.

ADVERTISEMENT

AND YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE ON JEFF'S COVER STORY IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

COLD, WET WEATHER CONTINUES TO HAMPER PLANTING, BUT THERE IS SOME PROGRESS THIS WEEK.

CORN PLANTING IS STILL WAY BEHIND IN NORTH DAKOTA, AT 4 PERCENT, BUT IN THE PAST WEEK JUMPED 20 PERCENT IN SOUTH DAKOTA, 26 PERCENT IN MINNESOTA AND 43 PERCENT IN IOWA. NATIONALLY, THE PERCENT IS NOW 18 PERCENT BEHIND THE 5 YEAR AVERAGE.

SOYBEAN PLANTING, NATIONALLY, CREPT UP OVER THE LAST WEEK, AND IS NOW ONLY 9 PERCENT BEHIND THE 5 YEAR AVERAGE. BUT IT'S STILL WELL BEHIND IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS.

SPRING WHEAT IS STILL WELL OFF ITS NATIONAL AVERAGE PACE OF 67 PERCENT, BUT SOUTH DAKOTA AND MONTANA ARE RIGHT AROUND OR ABOVE AVERAGES. AT 5 PERCENT, MINNESOTA IS 70 PERCENT BEHIND ITS 5 YEAR AVERAGE.

OATS ARE 67 PERCENT PLANTED NATIONALLY, DOWN ONLY 15 PERCENT FROM AVERAGE. AT 40 PERCENT, SOUTH DAKOTA IS JUST 18 PERCENT BEHIND ITS 5 YEAR AVERAGE FOR OATS, WHILE IOWA IS 20 PERCENT BEHIND AND MINNESOTA LAGGING BY 30 PERCENT.

ADVERTISEMENT

USDA HAS DECREASED ITS PROJECTIONS FOR THE U.S. CORN CROP.

IN THE LATEST WASDE REPORT, USDA LOWERED THE NATIONAL AVERAGE YIELD ON CORN TO 177 BUSHELS PER ACRE. RANDY MARTINSON, OF MARTINSON AG RISK MANAGEMENT, SAYS IT'S EARLY IN THE SEASON TO MAKE THAT PREDICTION.

Randy Martinson: That's really unusual for them to do that, they normally don't. They normally like to see you know, it's getting to the growing season a little bit before they make adjustments on the production side, so this was a huge to see them do that and it tells us that they're a little bit worried about the planting and that you know where the acres are going to get put, they're not going to get put in the best condition. So that is significant for the corn market.

IN ADDITION, USDA LOWERED FEED DEMAND BY 275 MILLION BUSHELS, AND EXPORTS BY 100 MILLION BUSHELS FROM THIS YEAR, GOING INTO 2022. THAT MAY INDICATE TIGHTER STOCKS THAN THE USDA WANTS TO SEE.

YOU CAN HEAR ALL OF RANDY MARTINSON'S MARKET WRAP AT AGWEEK.COM .

THE LATE START MEANS SOME GROWERS ARE SKIPPING WHEAT THIS YEAR, AND GOING STRAIGHT TO CORN AND SOYBEANS.

DWAYNE GORDER FARMS NEAR ESTELLINE, IN EAST CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA. AFTER A DRY YEAR IN 2021, RAIN DELAYED PLANTING UNTIL MAY 10TH THIS YEAR. GORDER WILL PLANT ONLY CORN, SOYBEANS AND ALFALFA ON HIS 700 ACRES. THERE WAS WHEAT IN HIS ROTATION LAST YEAR, BUT THERE WON'T BE THIS YEAR.

Dwayne Gorder: IT'S GOTTEN TO BE LATE THIS YEAR, AND LATE PLANTED CEREAL GRAINS IS NOT A GOOD COMBINATION USUALLY.

GORDER SAYS HE'S CONCERNED THAT SOME PEOPLE MAY BE RUSHING TO GET THE CROP IN, AND IF THERE'S AN EARLY FROST OR OTHER BAD WEATHER, YIELDS WILL SUFFER.

AFTER THE VIOLENT STORMS THAT MADE THEIR WAY THROUGH THE REGION EARLIER THIS SPRING, LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS HAVE HAD TO NAVIGATE SOME CHALLENGES DUE TO EXCESSIVE MOISTURE, AND AN IMMENSE AMOUNT OF MUD IN THEIR PASTURES.

Miranda Meehan: We've had some challenging weather the last month as everyone knows.

MIRANDA MEEHAN IS A LIVESTOCK AND ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP SPECIALIST WITHIN NDSU EXTENSION. SHE SAYS THE MUD LEAVES MANY FARMERS AND RANCHERS WITH NOWHERE TO PUT THEIR CATTLE.

Miranda: There's just not a lot of options for people to get their animals out of the mud too because lots are muddy.

Zac: Mud harbors pathogens very very well.

ZAC CARLSON, AN NDSU EXTENSION BEEF CATTLE SPECIALIST, URGES RANCHERS AND FARMERS TO BE AWARE OF THE POSSIBLE HEALTH RISKS THAT COME ALONG WITH CALVES BEING IN A MUDDY AREA FOR A LONG PERIOD OF TIME.

Zac: Maybe the cow's udder’s dirty. Covered in mud which contains manure and some of these pathogens. That calf is going to consume that then, that mud and get that in its mouth and its digestive system. And then now we have a digestive infection and then we'll see it in scours.

HOWEVER, IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE CATTLE ARE NOT MOVED FROM THE MUDDY LOTS TO THE PASTURE BEFORE THE GRASS IS GRAZING READY.

Miranda: If we graze our grasses too early, it can set us back in terms of total production for the grazing year. Up to sixty-percent or more.

BECAUSE OF THAT, MEEHAN ADVISES RANCHERS USE GOOD JUDGMENT WHEN PUTTING ANIMALS OUT TO GRAZE. SHE ALSO SAYS SOME OF THE REGION'S TAME GRASSES, SUCH AS BROME, HAVE REACHED GRAZING READINESS.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE KICK OFF ANOTHER SEASON OF OUR POPULAR "FOLLOW A FARMER" SERIES... WITH A YOUNG WOMAN JUST GETTING STARTED..

LAST YEAR WE FOLLOWED THREE FARMERS FROM AROUND THE REGION, THROUGHOUT THE SEASON. IT WAS SO POPULAR, WE'RE DOING IT AGAIN THIS YEAR.

WE'RE KICKING IT OFF WITH A WOMAN WHO'S JUST STARTING OUT. LILY BERGMAN GOT HER DEGREE IN AG ENGINEERING THIS SPRING FROM NDSU. BUT AT 22, SHE'S BEEN WORKING ON THE FAMILY FARM IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA FOR HALF HER LIFE. AND SHE'S BEEN FARMING ON HER OWN SINCE SHE WAS 17. SHE GROWS SUGARBEETS, WHEAT, PINTO BEANS AND SOYBEANS ON 600 ACRES OF RENTED LAND. MOST YEARS, SHE WOULD HAVE STARTED PLANTING, BUT SHE SAYS THEIR DRYEST GROUND ISN'T READY YET, AND SOME IS STILL UNDER WATER. BUT SHE REMAINS OPTIMISTIC.

Lily Bergman: WE'VE HAD A LOT OF YEARS WHERE WE AREN'T IN THE FIELDS UNTIL THE END OF MAY AND STILL COME OUT WITH A GOOD CROP. SO I JUST TRY TO STAY HOPEFUL AND KNOW THAT THINGS CAN STILL TURN AROUND. BUT YEAH, WE'RE GETTING PRETTY ANTSY NOW.

IN THE MEANTIME, SHE'S KEEPING BUSY, GETTING THE EQUIPMENT READY. SHE AND HER DAD, WHO FARM TOGETHER, BOUGHT A BEET LIFTER AND BEAN COMBINE LAST YEAR, SO SHE'S EXCITED TO TRY THE NEW EQUIPMENT LATER THIS SEASON.

NOW WE TRAVEL FROM THE NORTHERN RED RIVER VALLEY TO THE SOUTHERN VALLEY, TO MEET ANOTHER FARMER WE'LL BE FOLLOWING THIS SEASON.

VANCE JOHNSON RAISES CORN, SOYBEANS, WHEAT AND SUGARBEETS ON THIS FOURTH GENERATION FARM ON BOTH SIDES OF THE RED RIVER NEAR BRECKENRIDGE, MINNESOTA.

WHEN WE STOPPED THIS WEEK, HE HAD JUST GOTTEN INTO THE FIELD, AND WAS GETTING STARTED WITH CORN. JOHNSON SAYS IN A NORMAL YEAR, HE WOULD HAVE HAD WHEAT AND BEETS IN BY EARLY MAY, BUT HE HADN'T EVEN STARTED THOSE. HE CALLS THIS SEASON...NERVE WRACKING.

Vance Johnson: ACTUALLY FRUSTRATING IS PROBABLY THE BIGGEST THING. ALL SPRING WE'VE BEEN TO THE POINT WHERE WE NEED TWO DAYS TO GET DECENT FIELD CONDITIONS, AND ONE DAY OUT IT RAINS ON US. SO WE'VE BEEN A DAY OUT FOR THE LAST THREE WEEKS.

JOHNSON'S FARM IS ALSO THE SITE OF A SIXTY-ACRE TEST PLOT. THIS IS THE SECOND YEAR. LAST SUMMER JOHNSON PLANTED CORN INTO WHAT HAD BEEN A WHEAT FIELD. THIS SUMMER, HE'S FOLLOWING CORN WITH SUGARBEETS. THERE WILL BE A DEMONSTRATION DAY JULY 13TH.

LIKE MANY FARMERS IN THE REGION, A LOCAL NON-PROFIT IS ALSO AT THE MERCY OF MOTHER NATURE.

FARM RESCUE HELPS FARM AND RANCH FAMILIES DURING TRYING AND DIFFICULT TIMES, SUCH AS A DEATH WITHIN THE FAMILY OR AN ILLNESS. DURING A NORMAL YEAR FARM RESCUE WOULD BE WELL UNDERWAY WITH THEIR PLANTING SEASON, BUT DUE TO THE EXCESSIVE MOISTURE, THEY HAVE BEEN AT A STANDSTILL.

Dan Erdmann: Our schedule is full for the spring here and a lot of planting assistance requests that we've taken on and the window is getting smaller to provide that assistance.

HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME AREAS WITHIN FARM RESCUE'S TERRITORIES WHERE PLANTING HAS FINALLY BEGUN

We had a planting case down in Kansas and a couple before that in that same state, and then we've also been working in Iowa and Minnesota this week. So we're definitely keeping busy, but things are going to be a lot busier when conditions are finally right to get into the field in some of these wet places.

FARM RESCUE HELPS FARM AND RANCH FAMILIES IN SEVEN DIFFERENT STATES.

LEADERS FROM THE FEDERAL AGENCY THAT REGULATES THE NATION'S LARGEST PROVIDER OF AG FINANCING GOT A FIRST-HAND LOOK AT MIDWEST AG THIS WEEK.

THE FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION OVERSEES THE FARM CREDIT SYSTEM, WHICH IS THE MAIN SOURCE OF AG FINANCING. LEADERS OF THE AGENCY TOURED MINNESOTA AND IOWA, SO THEIR EMPLOYEES CAN LEARN ABOUT PROJECTS THEY FINANCE. FCA CHAIR AND CEO GLEN SMITH SAYS HE'S PLEASED TO SEE HOW THEIR YOUNG, BEGINNING AND SMALL FARMER PROGRAMS ARE WORKING, AS THEY VISITED A FARM RUN BY THE HMONG AMERICAN FARMERS ASSOCIATION.

Glen Smith: I WAS VERY IMPRESSED WITH THAT. THEY TOOK THE ADVANTAGE OF THE RESEARCH, THE TECHNOLOGY, THE FINANCING OF THE GROUP AS A WHOLE, AND THEN MADE IT AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL PRODUCERS. SO THAT'S AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF HOW WE CAN HELP THOSE YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS GET STARTED.

THE GROUP ALSO VISITED SOME OTHER SMALL FARMS, A RURAL HEALTHCARE FACILITY, AND FARMAMERICA, THE MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL INTERPRETIVE CENTER.

Jessica Rollins: IT'S EXCITING TO HAVE THEM IN OUR SPACE, BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM HAVE NOT BEEN TO FARM AMERICA BEFORE. AND A LOT OF THEM HAVE NOT, FROM MY UNDERSTANDING, BEEN ON FARMS BEFORE. SO IT'S A NEAT OPPORTUNITY FOR THEM TO GET A NEW EXPOSURE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE COUNTRYSIDE.

THE GROUP MADE SEVEN STOPS IN MINNESOTA AND IOWA.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, LATE PLANTING CAN LEAD TO EXCESS WEED PRESSURE THIS YEAR FOR SOYBEAN GROWERS. WE'LL HAVE SOME ADVICE ON PREVENTING IT.

AS WE INCH TOWARD SPRING, THE REGION SAW A MIXED BAG THIS WEEK.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

THIS SEASON HAS BEEN TOUGH FOR GROWERS SO FAR, AND IT COULD MEAN PROBLEMS THROUGHOUT THE SEASON. AS ROSE DUNN REPORTS IN THIS MONTH'S SOY INSIGHT, WE SEE HOW PLANTING DELAYS COULD GIVE WEEDS THE CHANCE TO GET A FOOTHOLD.

Greg Endres: THIS SPRING IS QUITE A CONTRAST TO LAST SPRING.

THAT MAY BE AN UNDERSTATEMENT. LAST YEAR'S DROUGHT HAS GIVEN WAY TO A COOL, WET SPRING THAT'S SIGNIFICANTLY DELAYED PLANTING AROUND THE REGION. NDSU CROPPING SYSTEMS SPECIALIST GREG ENDRES SAYS THIS COULD ESPECIALLY AFFECT THE SOYBEAN CROP. BUT HE URGES GROWERS TO WAIT FOR SOIL TO DRY OUT AND WARM UP.

Greg Endres: SOYBEAN AGAIN IS A CROP THAT WILL PERFORM VERY WELL WITH MINIMAL SOIL DISTURBANCE, SO WE'D ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO MINIMIZE THEIR TILLAGE THIS SPRING, PLUS IT WILL SAVE SOME TIME. BUT IT'S HARD TO BE PATIENT.

TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, LATE PLANTING COULD GIVE WEEDS, ESPECIALLY KOCHIA AND WATER HEMP, THE CHANCE TO GET A FOOTHOLD IN FIELDS, BEFORE CROPS.

Joe Ikley: THOSE WEEDS SPECIFICALLY, IT'S VERY IMPORTANT NOT TO SKIP APPLYING A PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE.

NDSU EXTENSION WEED SPECIALIST JOE IKLEY SAYS THIS IS ESPECIALLY A CONCERN FOR SOYBEANS. HE SAYS GROWERS IN A TIGHT PLANTING WINDOW MAY BE TEMPTED TO SKIP THE PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDES, BUT HE STRONGLY URGES GROWERS NOT TO MISS THAT STEP.

Joe Ikley: IF YOU CAN, SLOW THE PLANTERS DOWN. MAKE SURE YOU GET WITHIN THREE DAYS AFTER PLANTING THE FIELD, TRY AND GET A SPRAYER INTO THAT FIELD, GET A PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE APPLICATION MADE.

IKLEY SAYS ANOTHER TACTIC IS TO INCORPORATE HERBICIDES AHEAD OF PLANTING IN CONVENTIONAL TILL SYSTEMS. BUT NO MATTER WHEN YOU DO IT, IT'S IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER WIND SPEED.

Joe Ikley: CROP YOU CAN PLANT IN 30, 40 MILE PER HOUR WINDS. WE CAN'T BE SPRAYING HERBICIDE WHEN IT'S THAT WINDY.

ENDRES SAYS IT'S LIKELY THE LATE START WILL AFFECT YIELDS, BUT IT'S TOO EARLY TO PREDICT HOW MUCH.

Greg Endres: THIS YEAR, WHO KNOWS. BUT ANYWAY, WE'LL DO THE BEST WE CAN. WE'VE GOT GOOD SOIL MOISTURE AND EVENTUALLY WE'LL HAVE CONSISTENT WARM DAYS, AND WE'LL HOPE FOR THE BEST FOR HAVING A GOOD SOYBEAN YIELD.

IN FARGO, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

ENDRES ALSO SAYS IT'S GOOD IDEA TO USE A FUNGICIDE SEED TREATMENT IN A YEAR LIKE THIS WITH COLD, WET FIELDS.

STILL AHEAD, A BIG NAME IN AG WILL BE BACK AT BIG IRON THIS YEAR...

SLOWLY BUT SURELY, THE AGRICULTURE AND FARM SHOW WORLD IS RETURNING TO PRE-PANDEMIC FORM.

AFTER TAKING A YEAR OFF, TITAN MACHINERY WILL BE BACK AT THE BIG IRON FARM SHOW THIS FALL IN WEST FARGO. LIKE MANY OTHER EQUIPMENT DEALERS, TITAN OPTED OUT OF THE 2021 BIG IRON SHOW DUE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC.

Mike Hall: A lot of that stuff went on hold because of the pandemic, so we did step back from Big Iron. Also our manufacturers had the same problem, they did not want to send people out potentially in a harmful situation. So we stepped back from Big Iron along with Case I-H.

HOWEVER, SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUES MAY MAKE IT DIFFICULT FOR TITAN TO HAVE A LOT OF MACHINERY AT BIG IRON.

As for equipment, that really is the challenging part. In a year like this where demand for equipment is very high, commodity prices are high, we still have supply chain issues just like everybody else is dealing with. Our competitors have the same problem.

TITAN MACHINERY WILL HAVE CASE I-H, CASE CONSTRUCTION AND NEW HOLLAND EQUIPMENT AT THEIR BIG IRON BOOTH.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

AS THE MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE LOOKS TO WRAP UP SOON, THE AG COMMISSIONER SAYS LEADERS HAVE AGREED ON A $18.4 MILLION DROUGHT RELIEF BILL AND $15 MILLION FOR SUPPLEMENTAL AG.

AND A METEOROLOGIST AND COMMODITY ADVISER SAYS THIS YEAR'S LA NIÑA IS ACTUALLY STRONGER THAN THE LA NIÑA EVENTS OF 1989, '99, 2008 AND 2011.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

What to read next
International Pollinator Week is June 20-26.
When sugarbeet plants are young, besides being damaged by blowing dirt, they are vulnerable to being sheared off by the high winds, a condition referred to as “helicoptering.”
The justices turned away a Bayer appeal and left in place a lower court decision that upheld $25 million in damages awarded to California resident Edwin Hardeman, a Roundup user who blamed his cancer on the pharmaceutical and chemical giant's glyphosate-based weedkillers.
June is National Dairy Month. The Dickinson Press toured a local dairy farm and learned firsthand about the challenges dairy farmers face in southwest North Dakota.