ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

AgweekTV Full Show: From the Northern Corn and Soybean Expo

This week on AgweekTV, we're at this year's Northern Corn and Soybean Expo with the hottest topics among growers for 2022, including the future of carbon markets. We'll look at the shipping challenges that have plagued agriculture and when they might ease. Another tragic death in a grain bin has experts urging safety. And we'll have the outlook for global meat exports.

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, we're at this year's Northern Corn and Soybean Expo with the hottest topics among growers for 2022, including the future of carbon markets. We'll look at the shipping challenges that have plagued agriculture and when they might ease. Another tragic death in a grain bin has experts urging safety. And we'll have the outlook for global meat exports.

See more from AgweekTV
It's "high summer" now, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says. And that means you can expect regular heat, thunderstorms and irregular rainfall. This week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast for the next two weeks holds true to that summer pattern.
This week on AgweekTV, a new technology could come sweeping through ranchers' pastures. A group of farmers "lawyer up" for proper pay for using their land for the Red River Water Supply pipeline. North Dakota potatoes will soon be under the Golden Arches of McDonald's. We'll visit a grain elevator house and check out updates made since we were first there four years ago. And we profile Harvest Hope Farm's camps, which allows kids to see what farm life is like.
Harvest Hope Farm hosts summer camps that allow youth to experience what life is like on the farm. While it is only for a few hours a day, the little ones get to be immersed in not only the great outdoors, but agriculture as well.
This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.
The heat wave in the northern Plains won't last much beyond this weekend, but it likely will stay warm, with thunderstorms likely scattered in the region, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says on this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

WE ARE EXCITED TO BE BACK AT THE FARGODOME IN FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA AT THIS YEAR'S NORTHERN CORN AND SOYBEAN EXPO.

THE EVENT WAS HELD VIRTUALLY IN 2021 BUT RETURNED THIS YEAR WITH A FULL TRADE SHOW AND SOME TOP NOTCH EDUCATIONAL EVENTS FOR PRODUCERS, LOOKING AT TOPICS LIKE AG TAXATION, CYBERSECURITY, BIOFUELS AND GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN CHALLENGES. THE EVENT IS PUT ON BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN AND CORN COUNCILS.

ADVERTISEMENT

THIS IS ALSO THE ANNUAL MEETING FOR BOTH THE NORTH DAKOTA CORN AND SOYBEAN GROWERS ASSOCIATIONS.

IT'S WHERE BOTH GROUPS CONDUCT THEIR BUSINESS MEETINGS AND TALK ABOUT THEIR STATE AND NATIONAL POLICY FOR THE COMING YEAR. SO WHAT'S IMPORTANT TO EACH ORGANIZATION?

Kasey Bitz: We're really kind of turning the page and looking at the next farm bill, you know, starting to have those conversations at the local level to take to D.C. and say this is the message, this is what's working out in the field and we need to see some changes then.

Andrew Mauch: We're really excited with the infrastructure bill that we got passed here in North Dakota to get some funding to our roads and bridges. That was kind of top priority for us last year and to continue to build on that going forward it's huge, and we're starting to talk to area farmers about the upcoming farm bill.

THE GROUPS WILL TAKE THEIR APPROVED RESOLUTIONS AND BUSINESS ON TO THE BUSINESS SESSIONS OF THEIR NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS.

CARBON MARKETS AND CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE HAVE BEEN A HOT TOPIC IN THE INDUSTRY OVER THE LAST YEAR. BUT IS THERE REVENUE TO BE MADE FROM CARBON MARKETS? JOINING US TO VISIT ABOUT THAT IS NDSU'S DAVID RIPPLINGER. AND WHAT QUALIFIES AS CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES?

David Ripplinger: THERE'S TWO AT THE TOP OF THE LIST, NO TILL AND COVER CROPS THAT I THINK MOST OF US HAVE HEARD ABOUT. THERE'S OTHER HIGH PROFILE OR EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES, REALLY LOOKING AT NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT.

ADVERTISEMENT

SO ARE COMPANIES GOING TO PAY PRODUCERS FOR NEW PRACTICES OR EXISTING PRACTICES?

David Ripplinger: THE FOLKS WHO ARE BUYING THE CARBON CREDITS ARE LOOKING FOR NEW PRACTICES. SO IF YOU'VE BEEN DOING NO TILL FOR THIRTY YEARS, YOU'RE DOING IT AGAIN THIS YEAR, THE MICROSOFTS OF THE WORLD, THEY'LL WANT TO PAY YOU FOR THAT. AND SO UNFORTUNATELY FOR MANY CONTRACTS, IF YOU'VE HAD THE PRACTICE, ESPECIALLY FOR A DECADE OR MORE, YOU'RE NOT ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE.

SO HOW MUCH REVENUE CAN PRODUCERS GET OFF OF USING CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE, AND BEING IN A CARBON CONTRACT?

David Ripplinger: GENERALLY FARMERS CAN EXPECT TO SEE SOMEWHERE BETWEEN THREE, MAYBE TWENTY DOLLARS AN ACRE DEPENDING ON THE PRACTICE OR COMBINATION OF PRACTICES THAT THEY ADOPT.

SO DO YOU THINK THAT THERE IS ENOUGH MONEY TO BE MADE TO MAKE IT WORTH THE EXTRA RECORD KEEPING AND EVERYTHING ELSE THAT A PRODUCER HAS TO DO?

David Ripplinger: MY GENERAL RECOMMENDATION IS THAT FARMERS SHOULD LOOK AT THESE PRACTICES FIRST, DECIDE IF THEY MIGHT WORK FOR THEIR FIELD, FOR THEIR FARM, AND THEN LOOK AT THE INCENTIVES THAT THE CARBON CONTRACTS WOULD FIND, AS OPPOSED TO SEEING THAT AND FRAMING IT IN TERMS OF OH, I COULD GET AN EXTRA FIVE OR TWENTY DOLLARS AN ACRE, SHOULD I DO THIS PRACTICE?

AND HOW DOES USDA'S PROGRAM DOVETAIL INTO THIS?

YEAH, SO USDA JUST ANNOUNCED A VERY LARGE PILOT PROGRAM, A BILLION DOLLARS, TO CONDUCT ACTIVITIES ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. THEY'RE REALLY LOOKING AT SCIENCE TO SUPPORT ACTIVITIES, DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICES, DEVELOPMENT OF TOOLS TO SUPPORT THE PRODUCTION OF WHAT THEY'RE CALLING CLIMATE SMART COMMODITIES. AND SO WE'LL SEE WITHIN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS, BECAUSE IT'S A REALLY QUICK TURNAROUND, WHAT THEY'RE LOOKING FOR, AND WHAT THOSE PRACTICES THAT THEY'RE TARGETING MIGHT BE.

ADVERTISEMENT

WELL DAVE, THIS IS A REALLY IMPORTANT TOPIC, THANKS FOR YOUR EXPERTISE. DAVE RIPPLINGER, JOINING US WITH NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY.

SEVERAL AGRICULTURAL COMPANIES WERE SUBJECT TO CYBER ATTACKS THIS LAST YEAR FROM GIANTS LIKE JBS TO LOCAL COOPS. AGWEEK'S JEFF BEACH

JOINS US WITH MORE ON THIS IMPORTANT TOPIC.

SPEAKERS HERE AT THE EXPO TALKED ABOUT COMMON CYBER VULNERABILITIES .

SARAH ENGSTROM IS A CYBERSECURITY EXPERT WITH AG COOP CHS. SHE SAYS THERE ARE VARIOUS AREAS OF VULNERABILITY AND HACKERS ARE LOOKING FOR LOW HANGING FRUIT. NOT ONLY WITHAGRIBUSINESSES BUT INDIVIDUAL'S PERSONAL INFORMATION.

Sarah Engstrom: TOO WEAK USERNAMES OR PASSWORDS. THESE BAD ACTORS CAN PRETTY EASILY BREAK INTO THOSE TYPES OF APPLICATIONS USING THAT INFORMATION. SO IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT TO IMPLEMENT MULTI-FACTOR AND TWO, TO INSURE THAT YOU KNOW HOW PEOPLE ARE REMOTELY CONNECTING INTO YOUR ENVIRONMENT. AND THEN THREE, KEEPING YOUR SYSTEMS UP TO DATE.

HOWEVER, SHE SAYS THERE MANY ACTIONS COMPANIES AND INDIVIDUALS CAN TAKE TO PROTECT THEMSELVES FROM A CYBER ATTACK AND ACTIONS THEY CAN TAKE IN THE EVENT THAT THEY ARE HACKED.

FIRST AND FOREMOST I WOULD RESEARCH CYBER SECURITY INSURANCE POLICIES. AND WITHIN THAT APPLICATION FOR GETTING CYBER SECURITY INSURANCE, IT ASKS YOU SOME OF THOSE QUESTIONS OF, DO YOU HAVE MULTI-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION TURNED ON? HOW ARE YOU PROTECTING EMAILS AND MALICIOUS EMAILS THAT MIGHT BE COMING INTO YOUR ENVIRONMENT? SO THEY ASK YOU A LOT OF GOOD QUESTIONS THAT ARE GOOD FOOD FOR THOUGHT.

THERE ARE FREE SERVICES AVAILABLE FOR COMPANIES AND EVEN FARMERS TO USE TO PROTECT THEIR INFORMATION AND NETWORKS.

WHEN OUR SHOW CONTINUES FROM THE NORTHERN CORN AND SOYBEAN EXPO. WE'LL FOCUS ON THE ALWAYS IMPORTANT TOPIC OF GRAIN BIN SAFETY.

THE AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY HAS FACED SOME UNPRECEDENTED SUPPLY CHAIN CHALLENGES OVER THE LAST YEAR, WHICH CAN BE COSTLY TO FARMERS. HERE TO VISIT ABOUT THAT IS MIKE STEENHOEK WITH THE SOY TRANSPORTATION COALITION. WHAT ARE WE STILL DEALING WITH, MIKE?

Mike Steenhoek: WE'RE HAVING SOME CHALLENGES IN EACH LINK OF OUR SUPPLY CHAIN. AND YOU KNOW, WHETHER IT'S CONTAINERS, WHETHER IT'S WITH RAIL ISSUES, WHETHER YOU'VE GOT TRUCKING ISSUES, BARGE ISSUES. UNFORTUNATELY WE HAVE A SUPPLY CHAIN THAT'S OVERLY SUBSCRIBED, AND WE'RE SIMPLY TRYING TO ACCOMMODATE MORE THAN OUR SUPPLY CHAIN IS ABLE TO HANDLE. SO, AND I WOULD ARGUE ONE OF THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS CONFRONTING EACH OF THOSE LINKS IN OUR SUPPLY CHAIN IS AN INADEQUATE SUPPLY OF LABOR. IT'S ONE THING TO HAVE A TRUCK, YOU ALSO HAVE TO HAVE A TRUCK DRIVER. AND THAT'S ONE OF THE CHALLENGES THAT'S CONFRONTING EACH OF THOSE MODES OF TRANSPORTATION, PARTICULARLY IN RURAL AREAS.

AND SO MIKE THESE ARE ISSUES THAT ARE NOT GOING TO BE EASILY SOLVED, ARE THEY?

Mike Steenhoek: UNFORTUNATELY THERE ISN'T A MAGIC WAND. NOW WE'RE HOPING THAT WE'LL SEE WE'RE GETTING BEYOND THIS AND SO GRADUALLY THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF 2022 WE'LL SEE IT SUBSIDE SOMEWHAT, BUT IT IS SOMETHING THAT'S GOING TO BE WITH US FOR A WHILE.

SO MIKE WHO ABSORBS THE COSTS WHEN WE HAVE THESE SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTIONS? DOES IT GO DIRECTLY DOWN TO FARMERS ON THEIR BOTTOM LINE?

Mike Steenhoek: BECAUSE WE OPERATE IN SUCH A COMPETITIVE INDUSTRY,THERE ISN'T THIS UNLIMITED ABILITY TO JUST PASS THOSE TRANSPORTATION COSTS ON TO THE CUSTOMER. THAT WOULD BE NICE IF YOU COULD SIMPLY JUST DO THAT. BUT WHAT MOST OFTEN HAPPENS IN AGRICULTURE IS WHEN YOU HAVE A TRANSPORTATION COST ESCALATION, THOSE COSTS ARE USUALLY PASSED ON TO FARMERS IN THE FORM OF A WIDER BASIS OR A LOWER PRICE AT POINT OF SALE, RATHER THAN JUST SIMPLY PASSED ON TO THE CUSTOMER.

Well thanks so much for being with us today, great to see you. Mike Steenhoek joining us with the Soy Transportation Coalition.

A GRAIN BIN ACCIDENT THAT TOOK THE LIFE OF A NORTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA FARMER THIS MONTH IS AGAIN DRAWING ATTENTION TO SAFE GRAIN HANDLING.

GRAIN BINS ARE AMONG THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACES ON THE FARM, BUT AS MIKKEL PATES REPORTS, THERE ARE SEVERAL SAFETY MEASURES THAT CAN PREVENT DEADLY ACCIDENTS.

Mikkel Pates: THE WINTER OF 2021 AND ‘22 WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE A TOUGH GRAIN MANAGEMENT YEAR, BUT IT TURNS OUT IT'S NOT SIMPLE.

Ken Hellevang: THE FIRST THING IS ALWAYS TO BE MONITORING THE CONDITION OF OUR STORED GRAIN. // :42 THE SECOND THING THEN IS TO THINK IT THROUGH BEFORE WE GO INTO A GRAIN BIN.

GENERALLY, A DRY HARVEST MEANS DRIER GRAIN IN THE BIN. BUT IF AERATION FANS AREN'T COVERED, HIGH WINDS CAN DRIVE COLD AIR UP THROUGH WARMER, MOIST GRAIN, CAUSING ICE CRYSTALS TO FORM IN THE CORN ON TOP IN THE BIN. ON A WARM DAY, HEAT FROM THE SUN MAKES THOSE ICE CRYSTALS MELT, CREATING CRUSTING IN THE SURFACE CORN. CHUNKS OF THAT CRUST CAN CLOG THE AUGER BELOW. AND THAT CAN TEMPT FARMERS TO GO IN AND TRY TO BREAK UP THE CHUNKS, OR TO LOOSEN GRAIN FROZEN IN FREE-STANDING COLUMNS OR ON THE WALLS. ALL THIS IS A RECIPE FOR DISASTER WHEN THE CORN STARTS TO MOVE.

Ken Hellevang: ONCE THAT GRAIN FLOW STARTS, THE PERSON IS VERY RAPIDLY SUCKED DOWN INTO THE GRAIN MASS AND CAN ACTUALLY BE PULLED TO THE BOTTOM AND COVERED UP.

HELLEVANG SAYS TIMELY MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT CAN PREVENT TROUBLE FROM ARISING. BUT THE SAD REALITY IS THAT MANY FARMERS DON'T HAVE THE TOOLS HANDY TO KEEP THEM SAFE..

Ken Hellevang: VERY FEW FARMERS WILL HAVE THE HARNESS, THE PROPER ROPES AND THOSE ROPES ATTACHED PROPERLY TO THE BIN TO PREVENT THEM FROM BEING PULLED INTO THE GRAIN MASS.

SO THERE'S WAYS TO GET PEOPLE OUT OF GRAIN BIN ACCIDENTS, BUT THE BEST WAY IS TO AVOID THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE, WITH BETTER GRAIN MANAGEMENT. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES.

THE MOST RECENT REPORT FROM PURDUE UNIVERSITY FOUND 55-PERCENT OF AG CONFINED SPACE INCIDENTS WERE FROM GRAIN ENTRAPMENTS, WITH 64 FATAL OR NEAR FATAL CASES. NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA EACH HAD 7 OF THOSE, TIED FOR 2ND AMONG STATES. SOUTH DAKOTA AND IOWA WERE 3RD WITH THREE EACH.

ATTENDEES AT THIS WEEK'S EXPO GOT A DRAMATIC LESSON IN GRAIN BIN SAFETY. MEMBERS OF THE SHEYENNE VALLEY TECHNICAL RESCUE TEAM FROM KINDRED, NORTH DAKOTA SPECIALIZE IN DIFFICULT RESCUES LIKE THIS ONE.

CAPTAIN RICH SCHOCK SAYS ONE REASON THIS WORK IS SO MEANINGFUL TO THEM, IS THAT THEY LOST A MEMBER OF THE KINDRED FIRE DEPARTMENT IN AN ACCIDENT IN HIS OWN GRAIN BIN. SO THEY GIVE THESE RESCUE DEMONSTRATIONS TO TRY TO PREVENT TRAGEDIES.

Rich Schock: IT'S NICE TO BE ABLE TO SHOW THEM WHAT HAPPENS INSIDE AND GIVE THEM THE PERSPECTIVE OF WHAT IS EVOLVING WITH A POTENTIAL RESCUE AT AN ENGULFMENT.

SHOCK SAYS IT'S DISCOURAGING HOW MUCH MONEY IS SPENT ON TEACHING GRAIN BIN SAFETY, AND YET THE NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS CONTINUES TO INCREASE.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV

IF YOU HAVE A HIGHER QUALITY PRODUCT, YOU ALWAYS HAVE TO DIFFERENTIATE YOURSELF.

WE'LL GET INTO THE "MEAT AND POTATOES" OF AMERICAN MEAT AND POTATOES.

IT WAS A BITTERLY COLD AND SNOWY WEEK ACROSS THE REGION, BUT WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK FOR MARCH? HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

2021 WAS A RECORD YEAR FOR BOTH U.S. BEEF AND PORK EXPORTS, DESPITE THE UNPRECEDENTED SHIPPING CHALLENGES AT THE PORTS. SO WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK FOR 2022 AND BEYOND? EMILY BEAL TALKED TO INTERNATIONAL MARKETING EXPERTS AT THE EXPO TO FIND OUT.

THANKS MICHELLE. TODAY I'M HERE WITH JOHN HINNERS, THE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF THE U.S. MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION. SO, WHEN WE'RE TALKING ABOUT EXPORTING CERTAIN CUTS OF MEAT, DO YOU WANT TO GO AHEAD AND TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WHAT VARIETY EXPORTS AND THE IMPORTANCE THAT THEY HAVE?

John Hinners: WELL CERTAINLY, WHEN WE THINK ABOUT EXPORTING MEAT, YOU KNOW, TRADITIONALLY WHAT COMES TO MIND IS, ARE WE SENDING ALL THE GOOD STEAKS OUT OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THAT COULDN'T BE FARTHER FROM THE TRUTH. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE ARE DOING IS TRYING TO ADD VALUE TO THOSE CERTAIN CUTS OF MEATS, WHAT WE REFER TO AS VARIETY MEATS SUCH AS A BEEF TONGUE, MAYBE STOMACH OR A PORK LIVER. BY EXPORTING THOSE TO DIFFERENT MARKETS, WHERE THEY FIND A GREAT NEED AND DESIRE, AND ARE WILLING TO PAY MORE THAN WHAT WE ARE WILLING TO PAY HERE IN THE UNITED STATES. WE ARE GOING TO ADD VALUE TO THAT ULTIMATE CARCASS.

SO WE'RE EXPORTING THESE MEATS TO CHINA OR SOUTH KOREA, WHAT IMPACT DOES THAT HAVE ON THE INDUSTRIES OF CORN AND SOYBEANS IN THE U.S?

John Hinners: WELL IT'S A GREAT QUESTION. ACCORDING TO WORLD PROSPECTUS, WE'VE HAD A STUDY DONE, AND JUST ON THE RED MEAT EXPORTS, UNITED STATES BEEF AND PORK, WE'RE ABLE TO ADD VALUE TO THE CORN INDUSTRY AND THE SOYBEAN INDUSTRY, ANYWHERE FROM ELEVEN TO TWELVE PERCENT USUALLY ON AVERAGE.

AND AS WE LOOK INTO THE FUTURE, DO YOU THINK THERE'S STILL GOING TO BE A DEMAND FOR U.S. RAISED BEEF?

John Hinners: THERE'S ALWAYS GOING TO BE A DEMAND FOR AMERICAN RAISED BEEF. IF YOU HAVE A HIGHER QUALITY PRODUCT, YOU'VE ALWAYS GOT TO DIFFERENTIATE YOURSELF. WE'VE GOT TO HELP TELL THAT STORY, AND WHY IS IT BETTER? YOU KNOW, LET'S TALK ABOUT MARBLING. WE'VE GOT TO CONTINUE TO EDUCATE OUR IMPORTERS WHO ARE ACTUALLY BUYING THE PRODUCT, BECAUSE AT THE END OF THE DAY, IN THESE HIGH MARGIN MARKETS, YOU'VE GOT MAYBE TWENTY FIVE OTHER COUNTRIES VYING FOR SHELF SPACE. AND YOU'VE GOT TO BE ABLE TO SHARE WITH THEM WHY YOURS IS DIFFERENT, AND ULTIMATELY HOW IT'S GOING TO PERFORM FOR THE CONSUMER.

THANKS FOR JOINING US. JOHN HINNERS WITH THE U.S. MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION.

WEATHER AND DISEASE WERE HOT TOPICS AT THIS YEAR'S INTERNATIONAL CROP EXPO.

SOYBEAN, SMALL GRAIN AND POTATO GROWERS GATHERED IN GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA, TO LEARN THE LATEST ABOUT PRODUCING TOP YIELDS.

LAST YEAR THE HOT, DRY SUMMER AND LABOR SHORTAGES BROUGHT SOME CHALLENGES TO POTATO GROWERS.

NDSU EXTENSION POTATO AGRONOMIST ANDY ROBINSON SAYS IN A DROUGHT, GROWERS ARE DEALING WITH HEAT STRESS, AND MAINTAINING THE QUALITY DURING PROCESSING. AND THEY'RE ALWAYS ON THE LOOKOUT FOR DISEASES. HE SAYS POTATO WART IS A BIG PROBLEM FOR GROWERS IN PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA. SO THEY'RE TRYING TO KEEP IT, AND OTHER DISEASES, OUT OF THE U.S.

Andy Robinson: YOU DON'T WANT TO BE SHIPPING SEED THAT'S GOT A LITTLE BIT OF DIRT ON THE OUTSIDE OF IT TO OTHER AREAS, AND WHAT IF THAT DIRT HAS FUNGUS ON IT OR DISEASE, RIGHT? AND SO THAT'S WHY SEED SHIPMENTS ARE VERY HIGHLY SCRUTINIZED NOW, BECAUSE OF IT.

POTATO WART CAN LIVE IN THE SOIL FOR ABOUT TWENTY YEARS, MEANING THAT GROUND LIKELY CAN'T BE USED FOR POTATOES AGAIN.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL VISIT AN FFA PROGRAM TEACHING STUDENTS TO PROCESS MEAT.

WE ALL NEED TO EAT, RIGHT? WELL ONE NORTH DAKOTA FFA CLASS IS TEACHING STUDENTS TO PROCESS AND COOK THEIR OWN MEAT.

LEVI REESE IS THE AG TEACHER AND FFA ADVISOR IN HILLSBORO, NORTH DAKOTA.

AMONG HIS AG CURRICULUM IS A FOOD AND MEAT SCIENCE CLASS. IT WAS FUNDED IN PART BY A ONE THOUSAND DOLLAR GRANT FROM THE NORTH DAKOTA BEEF COMMISSION FOR KNIVES AND OTHER SUPPLIES.

HE SAYS THEY'RE LEARNING TO PREPARE A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF MEAT, AND THE HANDS ON LEARNING MAKES THE STUDENTS EXCITED TO COME TO CLASS.

Levi Reese: SO THEY'VE BEEN MAKING SAUSAGE, WE MADE BACON, WE'VE MADE PEPPER STICKS, WE'RE WORKING ON SOME SMOKED SALMON. BUT WE DO A VARIETY OF THINGS, JUST LEARN THOSE SKILLS SO THAT THEY CAN DO IT ON THEIR OWN WHEN THEY GET HOME.

THE STUDENTS EVEN BUILT A SMOKER SO THEY CAN DO THE WHOLE PROCESS IN-HOUSE.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK... WHAT DOES THE FORECAST HOLD FOR THE UPCOMING SPRING AND SUMMER? AND A NEW LAND STEWARDSHIP PROJECT CAMPAIGN IS USING BAWDY HUMOR TO PROMOTE THE POWER OF BUILDING HEALTHY SOIL ON SOUTHERN MINNESOTA FARMS.

THANKS SO MUCH FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, YOU CAN GO TO AG WEEK.COM , OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

What to read next
Kelly Leo accepted a position as Williams County agriculture and natural resources Extension agent in Williston in 2020, a year after her daughter, Devan Leo, joined the McKenzie County Extension team in Watford City as agriculture and natural resources agent.
International Pollinator Week is June 20-26.
When sugarbeet plants are young, besides being damaged by blowing dirt, they are vulnerable to being sheared off by the high winds, a condition referred to as “helicoptering.”
The justices turned away a Bayer appeal and left in place a lower court decision that upheld $25 million in damages awarded to California resident Edwin Hardeman, a Roundup user who blamed his cancer on the pharmaceutical and chemical giant's glyphosate-based weedkillers.