ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

AgweekTV Full Show: Fertilizer program, feed shortage, retiring farmer, soybean processing

This week on AgweekTV, USDA announces a new program to ease the pain of high fertilizer prices. The price of hay is up, as well as the quality. The Great Resignation comes to the farm. And a growing list of new soybean processing plants are in the works as the low-carbon fuel market explodes, but will there be enough beans?

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, USDA announces a new program to ease the pain of high fertilizer prices. The price of hay is up, as well as the quality. The Great Resignation comes to the farm. And a growing list of new soybean processing plants are in the works as the low-carbon fuel market explodes, but will there be enough beans?

See more from AgweekTV
It's "high summer" now, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says. And that means you can expect regular heat, thunderstorms and irregular rainfall. This week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast for the next two weeks holds true to that summer pattern.
This week on AgweekTV, a new technology could come sweeping through ranchers' pastures. A group of farmers "lawyer up" for proper pay for using their land for the Red River Water Supply pipeline. North Dakota potatoes will soon be under the Golden Arches of McDonald's. We'll visit a grain elevator house and check out updates made since we were first there four years ago. And we profile Harvest Hope Farm's camps, which allows kids to see what farm life is like.
Harvest Hope Farm hosts summer camps that allow youth to experience what life is like on the farm. While it is only for a few hours a day, the little ones get to be immersed in not only the great outdoors, but agriculture as well.
This week on AgweekTV, weather is the top issue affecting commodity prices right now. We'll hear about top concerns facing pork producers, at the World Pork Expo in Iowa. The crazy planting season of 2022 is about to end. And a Ukrainian farmer visits the region to get help for his war-torn homeland.
The heat wave in the northern Plains won't last much beyond this weekend, but it likely will stay warm, with thunderstorms likely scattered in the region, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says on this week's agriweather forecast on AgweekTV.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll get "boots on the ground" to check planting progress. Effects on the cattle industry from the April 12 blizzard are still going on. We'll continue our Follow a Farmer series with a look at potato planting. And, a prominent North Dakota potato farming family sells land to a trust linked to Bill Gates, one of the world's richest men.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

WITH THE ONGOING WAR IN UKRAINE RUSSIA HAS BANNED FERTILIZER PRODUCT EXPORTS RESULTING IN RECORD PRICES. IN RESPONSE, USDA IS SUPPORTING ADDITIONAL FERTILIZER PRODUCTION FOR AMERICAN FARMERS TO ADDRESS RISING COSTS, AND SPUR COMPETITION.

THE AGENCY WILL MAKE AVAILABLE 250 MILLION DOLLARS THROUGH A NEW GRANT PROGRAM THIS SUMMER. FSA ADMINISTRATOR ZACH DUCHENEAUX SAYS IT WILL SUPPORT INDEPENDENT, INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINABLE AMERICAN FERTILIZER PRODUCTION.

ADVERTISEMENT

Zach Ducheneaux: The details on the process for the grant program will be announced in the summer of 2022 and the first awards are expected to be out before the end of 2022.

ADDITIONALLY, TO ADDRESS GROWING COMPETITION CONCERNS IN THE AG SUPPLY CHAIN, USDA WILL LAUNCH A PUBLIC INQUIRY SEEKING INFORMATION REGARDING SEED AND AGRICULTURAL INPUTS, FERTILIZER AND RETAIL MARKETS.

I ALSO ASKED ADMINISTRATOR DUCHENEAUX ABOUT THE TIMELINE FOR RELEASE OF WHIP PLUS PROGRAM PAYMENTS.

HE SAYS THEY'RE TRYING FOR EARLY SPRING. NORTHERN PLAINS FARMERS HAVE BEEN PUSHING FOR DETAILS BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN FIVE MONTHS SINCE CONGRESS APPROVED THE TEN BILLION DOLLARS IN DISASTER RELIEF THAT WILL COVER BOTH CROP AND LIVESTOCK LOSSES.

A DROUGHT ASSISTANCE BILL WAS OVERWHELMINGLY PASSED BY THE MINNESOTA HOUSE, WHICH INCLUDES SUPPORT FOR AGRICULTURE AND DNR PROJECTS.

AN AGRICULTURE-ONLY VERSION MOVED THROUGH THE MINNESOTA STATE SENATE AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE. IT PROVIDES 6.5 MILLION DOLLARS FOR LIVESTOCK AND SPECIALTY CROP GRANTS AND 1.5 MILLION DOLLARS IN RURAL FINANCE AUTHORITY DROUGHT ASSISTANCE LOANS.

STATE LAWMAKERS AND GOVERNOR TIM WALZ BEGAN THE DROUGHT RELIEF DISCUSSION LATE LAST SUMMER, WITH HOPES OF PASSAGE DURING A SPECIAL SESSION BUT THAT DID NOT MATERIALIZE.

ADVERTISEMENT

ONE OF THE REGION'S BIGGEST HAY AUCTIONS HAS BEEN BUSIER THAN USUAL, BECAUSE OF THE SEVERE DROUGHT FOR MUCH OF THE UPPER MIDWEST DURING THE 2021 GROWING SEASON.

JEFF BEACH WAS THERE, AND JOINS US NOW WITH MORE ON WHAT HE FOUND.

HIGH DEMAND MEANS PRICES ARE UP, BUT SO IS THE QUALITY OF THE HAY THAT'S FOR SALE.

Les Bell: WELL OUR HAY CROP WAS PRETTY MUCH NON-EXISTENT.

SO LES BELL TURNED TO THE AUCTION BLOCK. HE'S BUYING HAY TO FEED THE GRASS-FED BEEF CATTLE HE RAISES NEAR MOTLEY, IN CENTRAL MINNESOTA. HE GRAZED EVERYTHING HE HAD, AND WHILE HE'S PAYING MORE TO FEED THEM THIS YEAR, HE SAYS MANY PRODUCERS AROUND HIM WEREN'T SO FORTUNATE.

Les Bell: WELL THERE'S BEEN MASSIVE LIQUIDATIONS IN OUR AREA WHERE GUYS SOLD WHOLE HERDS OF COWS. I MEAN, THEY'RE GONE.

HAY PRICES ARE UP 50 TO 100 DOLLARS PER TON OVER LAST YEAR, PART OF THE LINGERING EFFECTS OF THE DROUGHT OF 2021 IN MUCH OF THE WESTERN U.S.

ADVERTISEMENT

Al Wessel: THE PRICES HAVE INCREASED DRAMATICALLY.

AL WESSEL CO-OWNS MID-AMERICAN AUCTION COMPANY. HE SAYS THEY'VE BEEN BRINGING HAY IN FROM UP TO 500 MILES. HE SAYS QUALITY HAS BEEN HIGH, AND SO FAR, SUPPLIES ARE KEEPING UP WITH DEMAND.

Al Wessel: A LOT OF THOSE FOLKS ARE IN TUNE OF WHAT IT'S GOING TO COST. IT'S LIKE GOING TO THE GAS PUMP, IT'S LIKE THE OLD JOHNNY CASH SONG, I DON'T LIKE IT BUT I GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY. SO FORTUNATELY THERE'S GOOD WILLING BUYERS AND WILLING SELLERS.

MARK HARTH HAS 120 DAIRY COWS, AND IS A HAY AUCTION REGULAR. BUT THE HIGHER PRICES ARE KEEPING HIM FROM BUYING AS MUCH AS HE USUALLY DOES. HE'S MOSTLY BEEN TRYING TO GET BUY WITH HIS HAY LEFTOVER FROM THE YEAR BEFORE, SO HE'S LOOKING FOR QUALITY FEED TO SUPPLEMENT IT.

Mark Harth: I WAS LOOKING TO BUY NOTHING LESS THAN 170 ON THE FEED VALUE AND HONESTLY NOTHING LESS THAN 22 ON THE PROTEIN. IT'S UNHEARD OF TO HAVE NUMBERS LIKE WHAT THEY'VE HAD THE LAST COUPLE OF SALES HERE, AND TO HAVE THAT MUCH.

Jeff Beach: LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS ARE ALSO WATCHING THE PROGRESS OF A DROUGHT RELIEF BILL IN THE MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE, THAT COULD HELP PAY FOR SOME OF THE EXTRA COST OF FEED, AND HAULING WATER FROM LAST YEAR'S DROUGHT.

Les Bell: YOU PAY IT OR YOU GO WITHOUT, YOU KNOW, SIMPLE AS THAT.

MID-AMERICAN ALSO FILLS SOME HAY ORDERS FOR SOME BIDDERS WHO CAN'T BE IN SAUK CENTRE OR WHO CAN'T BE AT THE AUCTION.

THANKS JEFF.

EPA HAS APPROVED LABEL AMENDMENTS THAT FURTHER RESTRICT THE USE OF OVER-THE-TOP DICAMBA IN MINNESOTA AND IOWA THIS SEASON. IN MINNESOTA FARMERS SOUTH OF I-94 CAN'T SPRAY AFTER JUNE 12, NORTH OF THAT LINE THE CUTOFF REMAINS JUNE 30. THERE IS ALSO AN 85-DEGREE TEMPERATURE CUTOFF.

IN IOWA THE SPRAY CUTOFF DATE IS NOW JUNE 20.

THESE CHANGES ARE INTENDED TO REDUCE THE RISKS OF OFF TARGET SPRAY DRIFT.

IN THE LAST YEAR NUMEROUS NEW SOYBEAN PROCESSING AND RELATED BIOFUELS PLANTS HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED ACROSS THE U.S., WITH MORE IN THE WORKS. BUT WILL THERE BE ENOUGH SOYBEANS FOR ALL THIS EXTRA DEMAND? I TALKED TO FARMERS AND INDUSTRY EXPERTS TO GET THEIR TAKE.

The soybean processing industry is entering a new era, driven by the need for low carbon fuels like Renewable diesel, to meet California's low carbon fuel standard.

Jansen, It sequesters and eliminates a significant amount of greenhouse gas and carbon as compared to fossil fuels.

This new demand has been pushing up the price of soybean oil, which is now a much larger percentage of the value of soybeans.

Greg Anderson: I've heard anywhere from 47% to 51%, which is just incredible. I mean it never was that high.

And members of South Dakota Soybean Processors say that means near record crush margins for soybean facilities, which dictated their decision to build a new plant near Mitchell.

Jonathan Kleinjan: With this renewable diesel obviously they're forecasting that just go up and up and we need more oil. So as long as that's there I think the margins will be good.

Minnesota Soybean Processors also owns a third of the proposed Casselton, North Dakota plant and there's already a line forming for the soybean oil, even though they don't break ground until spring.

Ron Obermoeller: Biodiesel is going to have to fight for the oil, food companies are going to have to fight for the oil.

The big question is whether there will be enough soybeans to meet this growing future demand?

Jansen: You have about 60-percent of the volume of soybeans that is sent out of the country is export volume, that can stay domestically in some percentages. and be used in the production of food and fuel.

Plus other feedstocks like animal fat and corn oil can be used to make renewable diesel.

Anderson: Soy will continue to be the flagship feedstock for some years to come but yet we're going to need every feedstock to serve this growing market.

A market they expect to double by 2030.

THE NEBRASKA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION UNANIMOUSLY IMPOSED A 290-THOUSAND DOLLAR CIVIL PENALTY AGAINST A SOUTH DAKOTA GRAIN COMPANY.

BANGHART PROPERTIES OF GETTYSBURG WAS FINED ON MARCH 15 FOR PURCHASING GRAIN IN NEBRASKA WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE FINE WAS REDUCED TWO THIRDS FROM THE ORIGINAL PENALTY.

NO FARMERS LOST MONEY OR WERE UNPAID IN THE DEAL. THE COMPANY HAS 30 DAYS TO PAY THE FINE OR APPEAL.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WHY ONE FARMER HAS DECIDED THE TIME IS RIGHT TO CALL IT QUITS.

A LONG RUN HAS COME TO AN END ON ONE FAMILY FARM. THE BJORK FAMILY HAS FARMED IN SOUTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA SINCE 1898. BUT NOW, IT'S ENDING WITH THE FOURTH GENERATION. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mikkel Pates: WITH THE PRICE OF USED FARM EQUIPMENT THROUGH THE ROOF, SOME PEOPLE THINK NOW IS THE TIME TO RETIRE.

Brian Bjork: A LOT OF GUYS WILL FARM UNTIL THEY'RE 80 YEARS OLD, JUST BECAUSE THEY CAN'T GIVE IT UP.

BRIAN BJORK HAS FARMED HIS WHOLE LIFE, RAISING WHEAT, SOYBEANS AND LATELY CORN. BUT AT AGE 62, AFTER WRAPPING UP THE 2021 SEASON, HE DECIDED HIS 42ND CROP WAS HIS LAST.

Brian Bjork: WHEN I PUT ALL THE EQUIPMENT AWAY I WAS THINKING YEAH, I'LL DO ANOTHER YEAR. BUT AFTER HARVEST, AND WHEN YOU SIT AND LOOK AT SOME OF THE RESULTS FROM AUCTION SALES, THIS USED EQUIPMENT IS HOT, SO I DECIDED WHY WAIT ANOTHER YEAR? SO I GUESS THAT TRANSITIONED ME INTO THE POINT WHERE I DECIDED I GUESS I'M DONE.

AND WHILE BJORK IS ABLE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE HIGH USED EQUIPMENT PRICES, HE'S NOT GOING TO MISS THE HIGHER COST OF NEARLY EVERYTHING ELSE

Brian Bjork: I'M DONE WITH BUYING CHEMICALS, I'M DONE WITH WORRYING ABOUT FERTILIZER PRICES, I'M DONE WITH CROP INSURANCE, EXPENSIVE TRUCK LICENSES, AND ALL THAT STUFF . IT'S LIKE IT WAS A CHRISTMAS PRESENT TO MYSELF, TO JUST SAY HEY, I DON'T HAVE TO DO THIS ANYMORE.

This tractor here is the same as my parade tractor.

BJORK AND HIS WIFE. VAL. WILL STAY ON IN THE NEWER HOUSE, A DAUGHTER, HEIDI, AND HER FAMILY WILL CONTINUE RENT THE HOME PLACE. AND THEY'LL RENT THE LAND OUT TO A NEIGHBOR. BRIAN PLANS TO STAY BUSY AROUND THE COMMUNITY, AND EVEN HELP ON THE FARM.

Brian Bjork: THE YOUNG GUY I'M RENTING THE LAND TO, I'M GOING TO GET A SEAT IN ONE OF HIS TRACTORS IN THE SPRING AND FALL, SO THAT WILL BE A STRESS FREE ENVIRONMENT TOO.

Mikkel Pates: SO AFTER 42 CROPS, AND MAKING ALL THOSE FARM DECISIONS, BRIAN BJORK IS GOING TO ENJOY BEING A LANDLORD, AND SITTING IN SOMEONE ELSE'S TRACTOR CAB. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT FORMAN, NORTH DAKOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

CHRIS STYLES, A PUREBRED ANGUS BREEDER IN EAST CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA, LIKES TO GET A JUMP ON CALVING SEASON.

STYLES CALVES EARLY, TO ALLOW THE BULLS TO BE A BIT MORE MATURE AT THEIR ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE ON THE FIRST MONDAY OF MARCH. THAT WAY THEY CAN SERVICE MORE COWS PER BULL. THE MAJORITY OF THE STYLES CALVES ARE BORN FROM THE MIDDLE OF JANUARY THROUGH MARCH FIRST.

HE SAYS ALTHOUGH THEY TAKE A LOT OF PRIDE IN THEIR CATTLE, THEY USE ALL THE INFORMATION AND TOOLS AVAILABLE TO ACCEL THEIR GENETICS.

Chris Styles: OUR FIRST DRIVEN GOAL IS TO FIND CATTLE THAT ARE GOOD. WE WANT THEM TO PASS THE EYE TEST FIRST, THEIR STRUCTURE, THEIR PHENOTYPE. WE WANT THESE CATTLE TO HAVE SOME LONGEVITY.

STYLES SAYS HE LEARNED A NEW TRICK ON FACEBOOK TO KEEP THE CALVES EARS FROM FREEZING WHEN MOTHERS LICK THEIR TAGGED EARS - HE DUCT-TAPES THE TAGS TO THE CALF'S LEG AND ATTACHES THEM AFTER SUB-ZERO TEMPERATURES HAVE PASSED.

SOME OF THE ORGANIC CROPS GROWN IN THE DRIFTLESS REGION OF SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA AND WISCONSIN ARE BEING TURNED INTO SPIRITS.

THE LA CROSSE DISTILLING COMPANY USES ORGANIC GRAINS FROM AREA FARMERS TO MAKES ITS VODKA, GIN AND WHISKEYS. THEY DISTILL ABOUT SIX THOUSAND POUNDS OF GRAIN EACH WEEK.

ONE OF THE OWNERS, CHAD STAEHLY, SAYS THEY'RE TRYING TO DO AS MUCH AS THEY CAN SUSTAINABLY, INCLUDING USING POWER FROM THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER.

THEY MILL THEIR OWN GRAIN, AND THEN SEND THEIR SPENT GRAINS BACK TO FARMS FOR FERTILIZER AND LIVESTOCK FEED.

STAELHY SAYS THEY'RE LOCATED IN ONE OF THE MOST DENSE ORGANIC FARMING AREAS IN THE WORLD, SO THEY WANTED TO FEATURE THE ORGANIC PRODUCTION GOING ON IN THE REGION.

Chad Staehly: IT'S BEEN A WIN-WIN FOR US TO BE ABLE TO WORK DIRECTLY WITH FARMERS. IT'S A WIN FOR THE FARMERS, THEY'RE GETTING A SLIGHTLY HIGHER PRICE, AND WE'RE GETTING A BETTER PRICE BY DEALING DIRECTLY WITH THE FARM.

STAEHLY SAYS SOMEDAY THEY HOPE TO MOVE THE DISTILLERY TO A FARM, SO THEY CAN SHOW VISITORS THE WHOLE PROCESS, FROM SEED TO BOTTLE.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TELL YOU HOW TRYING BIODIESEL CAN BOOST YOUR BOTTOM LINE.

IT CERTAINLY FELT LIKE SPRING THIS WEEK, BUT DON'T GET THE PLANTERS OUT JUST YET.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL IS HOLDING A SERIES OF "FUELING YOUR FARM" WORKSHOPS ACROSS THE STATE, AND YOU STILL HAVE THREE CHANCES TO ATTEND ONE.

ROSE DUNN JOINS US NOW WITH DETAILS.

THE SOYBEAN COUNCIL WANTS NORTH DAKOTA FARMERS TO HAVE ALL THE LATEST INFORMATION ON BIODIESEL, AND IS ALSO OFFERING A REBATE TO GET THEM TO TRY IT.

Jena Bjertness: THE INDUSTRY OF BIODIESEL WAS REALLY BUILT BY FARMERS. THE PRODUCT WAS DEVELOPED BY FUEL CHEMISTS, BUT THE FARMERS SAW THIS OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOYBEANS AND THEY TOOK IT AND THEY RAN WITH IT.

ROSE: THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL IS WRAPPING UP A SERIES OF TWELVE "FUELING YOUR FARM" WORKSHOPS, TO HELP FARMERS BETTER UNDERSTAND DIESEL, RENEWABLE DIESEL AND BIODIESEL. EXPERTS WILL COVER IMPORTANT TOPICS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL OPERATION OF DIESEL EQUIPMENT, FROM PLANTING THROUGH HARVEST.

Jena Bjertness: TANK MAINTENANCE, TANK SAMPLING, FUEL ADDITIVES, AT WHAT POINT DO YOU NEED ONE. AT WHAT POINT ARE THEY A WASTE OF YOUR MONEY AND YOU DON'T NEED ONE. AND SO IN A YEAR WHERE FUEL PRICES ARE GETTING HIGHER, IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT THAT YOU MAKE SURE THAT YOU'RE MANAGING YOUR FUEL WELL.

ROSE: DAN SPEIKERMEIER GROWS CORN AND SOYBEANS NEAR SHELDON, NORTH DAKOTA. HE'S BEEN USING BIODIESEL FOR SEVERAL YEARS, AND HE APPRECIATES HOW IT HAS IMPROVED.

Dan Spiekermeier: NO ISSUES, FILTERS DON'T PLUG, IT'S BETTER FOR YOUR FUEL PUMP AND YOUR EMISSIONS. IT REALLY WORKS GOOD.

ROSE: THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL ALSO HAS A NEW REBATE PROGRAM, TO HELP FARMERS GIVE BIODIESEL A TRY, AND LEARN FIRST HAND HOW THIS FUEL CAN BENEFIT YOUR EQUIPMENT, YOUR ENVIRONMENT, AND YOUR BOTTOM LINE. FARMERS CAN GET UP TO 15 HUNDRED DOLLARS FOR TRYING B 10 OR B 20.

Jena Bjertness: WE'RE DOING THIS BECAUSE WE REALLY FEEL PASSIONATELY THAT FARMERS SHOULD TRY THEIR PRODUCT AND YOU KNOW, HOPEFULLY HAVE A GOOD EXPERIENCE AND TELL OTHERS TO DO IT TOO.

Dan Spiekermeier: WE MIGHT AS WELL USE WHAT CAN BENEFIT US, AND IT'S BETTER FOR THE PLANET, TOO.

THE FINAL THREE 'FUELING YOUR FARM" WORKSHOPS ARE MARCH 28TH IN GRAFTON, MARCH 29TH IN JAMESTOWN, AND MARCH 30TH IN BISMARCK. FOR MORE INFO OR TO REGISTER, GO TO THE ADDRESS ON YOUR SCREEN.

THE WORKSHOPS ARE FREE AND A MEAL IS PROVIDED.

THANKS ROSE.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, SOME TIPS FOR MAKING YOUR BRUNCH BETTER.

IF YOU'RE PLANNING A SPECIAL BRUNCH FOR EASTER OR MOTHER'S DAY, CRISTEN CLARK HAS SOME IDEAS TO MAKE IT EVEN BETTER.

CRISTEN CLARK IS THE IOWA FARMER WHO WRITES THE "FOOD AND SWINE" BLOG. SHE'S ALSO A MONTHLY AGWEEK MAGAZINE COLUMNIST, AND SHARES VIDEOS AT AGWEEK.COM .

THIS WEEK, SHE SHARES A VIDEO RECIPE FOR THE FAMOUS LEMON RICOTTA PANCAKES SHE FIRST TRIED AT SARABETH'S BAKERY IN NEW YORK. SHE ALSO SHARES SEVERAL OTHER IDEAS TO MAKE YOUR BRUNCH MEMORABLE.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A MINNESOTA FAMILY RAISES LONG HORNED, HIGHLAND CATTLE, WHICH ARE GROWING IN POPULARITY DUE TO THEIR GENTLE NATURE AND QUALITY MEAT.

AND THE REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE ALLIANCE HELD ITS FIRST EVER CONVERGENCE TO HELP FARMERS AND THE COMMUNITY LEARN ABOUT REGENERATIVE POULTRY.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. YOU HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

What to read next
Kelly Leo accepted a position as Williams County agriculture and natural resources Extension agent in Williston in 2020, a year after her daughter, Devan Leo, joined the McKenzie County Extension team in Watford City as agriculture and natural resources agent.
International Pollinator Week is June 20-26.
When sugarbeet plants are young, besides being damaged by blowing dirt, they are vulnerable to being sheared off by the high winds, a condition referred to as “helicoptering.”
The justices turned away a Bayer appeal and left in place a lower court decision that upheld $25 million in damages awarded to California resident Edwin Hardeman, a Roundup user who blamed his cancer on the pharmaceutical and chemical giant's glyphosate-based weedkillers.