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AgweekTV Full Show: Executive orders, dicamba use, Build your Base with Beef program and the cattle market

AgweekTV for Jan. 30-31, 2021.

Coming up on AgweekTV, we will talk about how President Biden has kicked his term off with several executive orders affecting agriculture. We will take a look at the uncertainty farmers are facing in regards to dicamba use in 2021 and beyond. We'll discuss the South Dakota Beef Industry Council's Build your Base with Beef program has gone national. Finally, we'll look at the cattle market squeeze and how it has left some lots empty and forced other operators to exit the business.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

PRESIDENT BIDEN KICKS OFF HIS TERM WITH SEVERAL EXECUTIVE ORDERS AFFECTING AGRICULTURE.

FARMERS FACE MORE UNCERTAINTY WITH DICAMBA USE IN 2021 AND BEYOND.

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Michelle: The South Dakota Beef Industry Council's Build Your Base with Beef Program has gone national.

AND THE CATTLE MARKET SQUEEZE HAS LEFT SOME LOTS EMPTY AND FORCED OTHER OPERATORS TO EXIT THE BUSINESS.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON THE ROAD THIS WEEK AT THE 24th ANNUAL SIOUX FALLS FARM SHOW.

THE REGIONAL EVENT SHOWCASES THE LATEST AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICES. PLUS THE CONVENTION AND DENNY SANFORD CENTERS CAN ACCOMMODATE EVEN THE LARGEST FARM EQUIPMENT.

John Riles: I think this is just a great facility to have an event. You know with the Premier Center and the large overhead doors we can get really some big equipment in here. So it's a great show to come and browse and look at everything from tractors to ultra-large grain bins and a lot of great equipment.

MORE THAN 320 EXHIBITORS JOINED WITH 25,000 PLUS FARMERS FROM SOUTH DAKOTA, NEBRASKA, IOWA AND MINNESOTA TO REVIEW THE LATEST FARM TECHNOLOGY FOCUSED ON IMPROVING YIELDS, REDUCING COSTS AND MANAGING RISK.

PRESIDENT BIDEN HAS BEEN BUSY THIS WEEK ORDERING A REVIEW OF VARIOUS FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND SIGNING A LONG LIST OF EXECUTIVE ORDERS. INCLUDED IS ONE DIRECTING AGGRESSIVE CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AND REJOINING THE PARIS CLIMATE ACCORD.

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IN A MOVE THAT COULD HELP RENEWABLE-FUEL POLICIES, BIDEN'S ORDER DIRECTS AGENCIES TO REVISIT VEHICLE FUEL-ECONOMY STANDARDS ROLLED BACK IN RECENT YEARS, AS WELL AS OTHER FOSSIL-FUEL EMISSION STANDARDS AND METHANE EMISSION STANDARDS. BIOFUELS OFFICIALS SAY THEY HOPE THE ADMINISTRATION VIEWS THEIR INDUSTRY AS A SOLUTION TO CLIMATE CHANGE.

Brian Jennings: If done right climate policy can really reward farmers for practices that sequester carbon in the soil, reward ethanol producers for reducing the carbon intensity of their facilities.

LIVESTOCK GROUPS ALSO WANT TO EMPHASIZE TO THE ADMINISTRATION THAT PRODUCERS ARE MORE SUSTAINABLE.

Tyler Bettin: And also continue the discussions on the positive story for the environment and the things and steps that our producers have done over the last 10, 20, 30 years to improve soil health, utilize manure as a resource and reduce that carbon footprint.

BIDEN ALSO CALLED FOR A REVIEW OF MORE THAN 100 OF THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION'S ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS. THAT INCLUDES CHANGES MADE TO THE WATERS OF THE U.S. RULE, EPA ACTIONS ON EMISSIONS AND PESTICIDE REGULATIONS. HE ALSO HALTED WORK ON THE KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE.

BIDEN'S TEAM ALSO SENT AN IMMIGRATION BILL TO CONGRESS THAT WOULD POTENTIALLY LEGALIZE MILLIONS OF PEOPLE NOW LIVING IN THE U.S. ILLEGALLY.

IT SETS UP A PROCESS FOR CITIZENSHIP AND, AMONG THOSE WHO WOULD BE ABLE TO APPLY FOR LEGAL STATUS, ARE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF FARM WORKERS. THEY WOULD GAIN LEGAL STATUS IF THEY CAN SHOW THEY WORKED IN AGRICULTURE AT LEAST 100 DAYS IN FOUR OF THE LAST FIVE YEARS. THOSE WITH WORK HISTORIES WOULD GET LEGAL STATUS IMMEDIATELY.

THE BILL DOES NOT ADDRESS SOME OF THE MAJOR CHALLENGES FACING U.S. AGRICULTURE AND THE CURRENT H-2A VISA PROGRAM.

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FARM GROUPS HAVE FOUGHT FOR YEARS TO MAKE IT EASIER TO BRING IN GUEST WORKERS AND ALLOW THEM TO STAY YEAR-ROUND TO ADDRESS LABOR SHORTAGES, ESPECIALLY IN DAIRY OPERATIONS.

THE UNITED STATES AGRICULTURE COALITION FOR CUBA IS ASKING THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION TO IMPROVE U.S.-CUBA RELATIONS. IN A LETTER TO BIDEN, THE GROUP SAYS NORMALIZED TRADE RELATIONS ARE TOUTED AS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR U.S. FARMERS. THE LETTER WAS SIGNED BY MORE THAN 20 GROUPS INCLUDING THE AMERICAN SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION AND THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF AG.

WITH THE NEW CONGRESS IN SESSION, COMMITTEE MEMBERS ARE BEING NAMED. THERE WILL BE SOME NEW FACES ON THE HOUSE AG COMMITTEE, INCLUDING TWO FROM OUR REGION.

REPRESENTATIVES MICHELLE FISCHBACH OF MINNESOTA AND RANDY FEENSTRA OF IOWA WERE NAMED AS NEW MEMBERS AND WILL HELP SET FOOD AND AG POLICY INCLUDING WRITING A NEW FARM BILL.

RETURNING MEMBERS INCLUDE SOUTH DAKOTA'S DUSTY JOHNSON AND MINNESOTA'S JIM HAGEDORN.

U.S. SOYBEAN EXPORTS ARE ON RECORD PACE JUST A FEW MONTHS INTO THE MARKETING YEAR.

AS OF JANUARY 28, SOYBEAN EXPORT SALES TO DATE TOTALLED 2.125 BILLION BUSHELS. THAT'S 96-PERCENT OF USDA'S PROJECTION FOR THE WHOLE YEAR. CHINA IS 60-PERCENT OF THAT TOTAL AT 1.28 BILLION BUSHELS. THEY'RE CRUSHING BEANS FOR FEED AS THEY REBUILD THEIR HOG HERD AFTER AFRICAN SWINE FEVER.

Monte Peterson: Certainly at the pace that we've started out this marketing year you know with both sales and load out. I mean global demand continues at a pretty significant pace.

U.S. BEANS LOOK CHEAP TO CHINA COMPARED TO THEIR DOMESTIC PRICE, WHICH HIT NEARLY $18 ON THURSDAY

U.S. CORN EXPORTS ARE ALSO ROBUST NOW TOTALLING 2.1 BILLION BUSHELS, 82-PERCENT OF PROJECTIONS. CHINA'S TENDERED NEARLY 614 MILLION BUSHELS, INCLUDING 147 MILLION BUSHELS THEY BOUGHT JUST THIS WEEK.

THEY'RE ALSO IMPORTING U.S. SORGHUM AND WHEAT AND ADM REPORTED TUESDAY, CHINA HAD PURCHASED 200 MILLION GALLONS OF U.S. ETHANOL FOR DELIVERY DURING THE FIRST HALF OF THIS YEAR.

A NEW DICAMBA LABEL LAW HAS SOME FARMERS AND APPLICATORS CONFUSED AND CONCERNED.

A SURPRISE EPA ANNOUNCEMENT, LEFT OVER FROM THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION, BROADENS THE ENDANGERED SPECIES LIMITATIONS, AND INCREASES BUFFER ZONES FOR SPRAYING. THE NEW LABEL IS ON XTENDIMAX, ENGENIA, AND TAVIUM USED ON DICAMBA-TOLERANT SOYBEANS IN THIS REGION.

PESTICIDE ADMINISTRATION SPECIALIST ANDREW THOSTENSON SAYS EPA PUBLISHED SOME RESTRICTIONS LAST OCTOBER, BUT NO ONE SEEMED TO REALIZE HOW WIDESPREAD THEY WERE. AND HE SAYS THE MITIGATION MEASURES WILL BE HARD TO FOLLOW.

Andrew Thostenson: I WON'T SAY THEY'RE IMPOSSIBLE, BUT IT PUTS THEM IN A VERY, VERY DIFFICULT BIND IN TERMS OF EITHER FOLLOWING THE PESTICIDE LABEL, OR IGNORING IT. I'M ALSO HOPEFUL THAT BOTH FARMERS AND CUSTOM APPLICATORS, INVENTIVE AS THEY ARE, THEY MAY COME UP WITH SOME LOGISTICAL SOLUTIONS TO DEAL WITH THIS HURDLE.

GALEN SCHERESKY SAYS THE NEW LABEL WILL EFFECTIVELY PREVENT HIM, AND OTHER APPLICATORS, FROM SPRAYING DICAMBA CLOSE TO FIELD BORDERS ON SOYBEAN FIELDS. HE SAYS IT WILL PUT A STRANGLEHOLD ON HIS ABILITY TO SERVE HIS CLIENTS, MANY OF WHOM HE SOLD SEED TO GO WITH THE CHEMICAL HE NOW CAN'T SPRAY.

Galen Scheresky: IF YOU GO INTO SPRAYING DICAMBA USING THE PROPER TECHNOLOGIES, FROM THE PROPER ADJUVANTS, LABEL TECHNOLOGIES AND NOT SPRAYING IN STUPID WINDS, YOU CAN DO AN EXCELLENT JOB ON XTEND.

NORTH DAKOTA AG COMMISSIONER DOUG GOEHRING SAYS HIS DEPARTMENT IS STILL EVALUATING THE CHANGE.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, CATTLE PRODUCERS FEEL THE MARKET SQUEEZE.

FOR THE FOURTH YEAR IN A ROW, CATTLE FEEDLOT OPERATORS ARE FEELING THE PRESSURE FROM WHAT THEY CALL A NO-WIN MARKET.

FEED PRICES ARE UP AND CATTLE PRICES STILL HAVE MANY IN THE RED. AS MIKKEL PATES REPORTS IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, THAT HAS SOME FEEDLOTS SITTING EMPTY.

Brandon Schweigert: THIS PEN IS OPEN AT THE MOMENT, IT DOESN'T DO US ANY JUSTICE HAVING EMPTY PENS.

BRANDON SCHWEIGERT RUNS SCHWEIGERT FEEDYARDS AT EDGELEY, NORTH DAKOTA WITH HIS DAD, DAVE. ORDINARILY, THE PENS WOULD BE FILLED WITH UP TO 2,000 ANIMALS, BUT A SERIES OF TOUGH YEARS IN THE FEEDLOT BUSINESS HAS ADDED DEBT AND CAUSED THEM TO CUT BACK AND MAKE ADJUSTMENTS.

Brandon Schweigert: THIS YEAR IN PARTICULAR, WE'VE CHANGED OUR STRATEGY TO MORE COWS. SOMETHING MAYBE A LITTLE BIT MORE SAFE, JUST BECAUSE IT'S UNCHARTED AND SCARY OUT THERE, WITH BUYING FEEDER CATTLE AND WEATHERING THE MARKETS AND ALL THAT.

THE SCHWEIGERTS ALSO RAISE CORN, SOYBEANS AND ALFALFA. AND WHILE GRAIN MARKETS HAVE IMPROVED, THE CATTLE MARKETS HAVE LARGELY DECLINED.

Steve Anderson: THE LAST THREE YEARS THE CATTLE INDUSTRY HAS REALLY TAKEN A HIT.

STEVE ANDERSON IS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF LENDING AT HOMETOWN CREDIT UNION, WHICH SERVES SOUTH CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA. MOST OF THEIR LOANS ARE IN FARMING, AND ABOUT 40% OF THOSE ARE IN CATTLE. SIGNIFICANTLY, ANDERSON SAYS THAT IN HIS 25 YEARS OF LENDING, THIS IS THE FIRST YEAR HE HAS HAD NO REQUESTS FOR LOANS TO BUY FEEDER CATTLE TO PUT WEIGHT ON.

Steve Anderson: SO IT'S A TOUGH INDUSTRY. WILL IT TURN AROUND? I HOPE SO FOR OUR YOUNG GUYS. BUT THEY'VE GOT TO REDUCE SOME COSTS IN ORDER TO STAY IN BUSINESS.

ANDERSON COUNTS NINE FEEDLOTS IN HIS TRADE AREA THAT EXITED THE BUSINESS IN 2020. HE THINKS ANOTHER NINE COULD GO THIS YEAR. WHILE THERE'S A LOT OF REASONS FOR THAT, THERE SEEM TO BE VERY FEW SOLUTIONS. AT EDGELEY, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE ON THIS STORY IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

THIS MILD WINTER HAS RESULTED IN LESS STRESS ON LIVESTOCK, BUT IT'S ALSO LEAD TO INCREASED LICE INFESTATIONS IN MANY CATTLE HERDS.

A COMMON SIGN OF A LICE INFESTATION IS CATTLE ITCHING THEIR HAIR OFF. AND SINCE HAIR INSULATES ANIMALS FROM THE COLD, THE PEST MUST BE CONTROLLED.

NDSU VETERINARIAN GERALD STOKKA WARNS AGAINST TREATING CATTLE FOR LICE TOO EARLY, AS IT WON'T BE AS EFFECTIVE. YOU'LL HAVE BETTER CONTROL IF YOU WAIT TO TREAT THEM UNTIL IT'S COLD, AND THE LICE ARE MORE ACTIVE.

Gerald Stokka: DON'T TREAT LICE UNTIL YOU SEE THE WHITES OF THEIR EYES. WHICH MEANS DON'T TREAT LICE UNTIL YOU SEE THAT THERE'S A NEED TO TREAT THEM. BECAUSE TOO EARLY, YOU'LL MISS SOME OF THAT POPULATION AND YOU WON'T GET GOOD CONTROL.

YOU CAN TREAT LICE WITH AN INJECTABLE OR A POUR-ON PRODUCT, BUT HE SAYS SOME OF THE INFESTATION PROBLEMS MAY BE DUE TO RESISTANCE TO THE STANDARD TREATMENTS.

STOKKA WARNS IF YOU DON'T TREAT THE WHOLE HERD, THEY MAY CONTINUE TO RE-INFEST EACH OTHER.

USDA'S RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY HAS MADE IMPROVEMENTS TO THE LIVESTOCK RISK PROTECTION OR LRP INSURANCE FOR 2021 IN RESPONSE TO PRODUCER FEEDBACK.

SPECIFICALLY, IT INCREASES FEEDER AND FED CATTLE LIMITS TO 6000 HEAD PER ENDORSEMENT, 12,000 HEAD ANNUALLY AND FOR SWINE TO 40,000 HEAD PER ENDORSEMENT OR 150,000 HEAD ANNUALLY.

RMA MODIFIED THE REQUIREMENT TO OWN INSURED LIVESTOCK UNTIL THE LAST 60 DAYS OF THE ENDORSEMENT, INCREASED ENDORSEMENT LENGTHS FOR SWINE UP TO 52 WEEKS AND ALLOWED UNBORN LIVESTOCK TO BE INSURED.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A NEW REPORT SHOWS MILK IS LOSING GROUND TO PLANT-BASED BEVERAGES.

AND LATER, THE PANDEMIC SEEMS TO BE GIVING ORGANIC GROWERS RECORD SALES.

OUR WEATHER TREND IS FINALLY CHANGING AND LOOKING A LOT MORE LIKE WINTER.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

PLANT-BASED BEVERAGES ARE CUTTING INTO SALES OF COW'S MILK.

BUT A NEW USDA REPORT SHOWS THOSE ALTERNATIVES AREN'T A MAJOR FACTOR IN THE LONG DECLINE IN THE AMERICAN CONSUMPTION OF COW'S MILK.

THERE IS A GROWING NUMBER OF NON-DAIRY ALTERNATIVES IN GROCERY STORES, INCLUDING THOSE MADE FROM CASHEWS, PEAS, OATS, SOY AND RICE, WITH ALMOND BEING THE MOST POPULAR.

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE MINNESOTA MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION SAYS PEOPLE STILL WANT REAL DAIRY PRODUCTS, FOR THEIR TASTE, TEXTURE AND HEALTH BENEFITS. BUT LUCAS SJOSTROM SAYS HAVING SO MANY CHOICES "WATERS DOWN" THE BEVERAGE MARKET.\u0009AND WHILE PEOPLE MAY BE DRINKING LESS COW'S MILK, THEY ARE EATING A LOT MORE CHEESE AND OTHER DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Lucas Sjostrom: FROM WHAT I HEAR FROM DAIRY FARMERS, YOU ALWAYS WANT THINGS BETTER, THE GRASS ALWAYS LOOKS TO BE GREENER, BUT THINGS ARE QUITE GOOD RIGHT NOW, AND I THINK MINNESOTA IS AND WILL CONTINUE TO BE A GREAT PLACE TO DAIRY FOR SOME TIME.

JOSTROM SAYS ABOUT 340 MILLION GALLONS OF PLANT-BASED ALTERNATIVES ARE CONSUMED ANNUALLY, COMPARED TO ABOUT 3.2 BILLION GALLONS OF COW'S MILK.

ORGANIC FARMING IS SEEING A BIG BOOST DURING THE PANDEMIC.

THE 2020 ORGANIC PRODUCE PERFORMANCE REPORT SHOWS SALES FINISHED UP 14% IN 2020 FROM THE YEAR BEFORE.

BEN BISBACH IS AN ORGANIC FARMER WHO GROWS HEIRLOOM BEANS IN THE ROOT RIVER VALLEY OF SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA.

LIKE MANY ORGANIC PRODUCERS, HE SAW RECORD SALES THIS YEAR, AND THINKS THERE'S AN OVERALL RENEWED INTEREST IN HEALTHY, LOCAL FOOD.

Ben Bisbach: WITH THE VIRUS GOING ON, PEOPLE ARE THINKING A LOT MORE ABOUT THEIR HEALTH, AND SO I THINK THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THAT SITUATION THINK ABOUT ORGANIC VERUS, YOU KNOW, CONVENTIONAL. OR

THEY THINK ABOUT EATING BEANS INSTEAD OF MEAT, YOU KNOW, OR THEY THINK ABOUT COOKING A HOME COOKED DINNER INSTEAD OF THROWING A FROZEN PIZZA IN THE OVEN.

ORGANIC VALLEY, THE NATION'S LARGEST ORGANIC FARMERS CO-OP, BASED IN WISCONSIN, REPORTS ELEVEN STRAIGHT PROFITABLE MONTHS IN 2020, BASED LARGELY ON INCREASED DEMAND FOR ORGANIC MILK.

THAT'S COMING OFF THREE YEARS OF RED INK, SO CO-OP EXECUTIVES ARE LOOKING AT HOW TO STAY PROFITABLE AFTER THE PANDEMIC.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A LOCAL BEEF CAMPAIGN IS GOING NATIONAL, WITH THE HELP OF AN OLYMPIC HOPEFUL.

THE SOUTH DAKOTA BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL'S BUILD YOUR BASE WITH BEEF PROGRAM IS A COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH THE SANFORD SPORT SCIENCE INSTITUTE AND SANFORD HEALTH. THE PROGRAM RECENTLY WENT NATIONAL AND ENLISTED A PROFESSIONAL ATHLETIC ENDORSEMENT. I CAUGHT UP WITH THIS FORMER UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA STANDOUT WHO IS NOW ON THE ROAD TO THE OLYMPICS.

USD and U.S. pole vault champion Chris Nilsin backs the Build Your Base program because nutrition and beef are key to his training regime.

Chris Nilsin: One of the biggest things I've learned from becoming a professional athlete is how important nutrition is. And with the Build Your Base program, their comprehensive sports nutrition program their premiere protein is beef and coincidentally since I was a freshman in college my premium meal has been some form of beef.

His coach Derek Miles turned him on to beef and he says it's improved his performance and recovery.

Nilsin: I think that's when I think I first started to notice how positively influential beef can be the night before a meet and having that good protein right before you go into a competition.

He says the protein in beef is also essential to athletes for muscle recovery.

Nilsin: Just as important as it is to stem up for a meet or some kind of practice day with good nutrition you need to replenish everything you lost after, you know, a hard work out.

Nilsin says beef is a nutrient dense whole protein, and his preference as an athlete.

Nilsin: It's either been steak and pasta, steak and veggies or just ground beef and just mix it together with some other kind of food. You know, The amount of protein that you can get from like even from even just a 3 ounce steak is amazing, exponential compared to a bunch of other proteins.

And beef is easy to incorporate into his busy lifestyle as he trains for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team.

MISS RODEO AMERICA AND ORAL, SOUTH DAKOTA BEEF PRODUCER JORDAN TIERNEY HAS ALSO ENDORSED THE PROGRAM. SHE SAYS BEEF IS IMPORTANT TO HER DIET ESPECIALLY WHILE TRAVELING. SHE'S NOT ONLY SHARING BEEF'S NUTRITIONAL MESSAGE, BUT THE GATE TO PLATE STORY OF HOW BEEF IS PRODUCED.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , AND YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

Emily grew up on a small grains and goat farm in southern Ohio. After graduating from The Ohio State University, she moved to Fargo, North Dakota to pursue a career in ag journalism with Agweek. She enjoys reporting on livestock and local agricultural businesses.
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