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AgweekTV Full Show: Ethanol industry, award-winning operation, Agvise, female ag teachers, grain bin technology

AgweekTV for July 10-11, 2021.

Coming up on AgweekTV, we will discuss the ethanol industry hitting another devastating court decision. We will tour an award winning regenerative farming operation in east central South Dakota. We will visit two ag businesses that are dedicated to staying in rural North Dakota. We will discuss the number of female ag education teachers rising. Finally, we will take a look at a farmer developing an inexpensive grain bin management technology.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THE ETHANOL INDUSTRY IS HIT WITH YET ANOTHER DEVASTATING COURT DECISION. WE'LL TOUR AN AWARD WINNING REGENERATIVE FARMING OPERATION IN EAST CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA. WE'LL VISIT TWO AG BUSINESSES THAT ARE DEDICATED TO STAYING IN RURAL NORTH DAKOTA. THE NUMBER OF FEMALE AG EDUCATION TEACHERS IS ON THE RISE. AND A FARMER DEVELOPS AN INEXPENSIVE GRAIN BIN MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

IN THE COURSE OF A WEEK THE BIOFUELS INDUSTRY HAS BEEN HIT WITH TWO DISAPPOINTING COURT RULINGS THAT COULD NEGATIVELY IMPACT ITS FUTURE GROWTH.

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FIRST WAS THE JUNE 27 SUPREME COURT RULING ON SMALL REFINERY EXEMPTIONS. THEN ON JULY 2 THE D.C. CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS REVERSED A 2019 RULE BY THE EPA THAT LIFTED OUTDATED RESTRICTIONS ON THE SALE OF E 15. THAT CASE WAS A CHALLENGED BY OIL REFINERS.

THE COURT SAID IN ITS 19-PAGE OPINION THAT THE REID VAPOR PRESSURE WAIVER RULE DOESN'T APPLY TO E 15 EVEN THOUGH THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION DECLARED IT TO BE SIMILAR TO E 10. BIOFUELS GROUPS ARE DISAPPOINTED. HOWEVER, IT DOES NOT APPLY TO THE 2021 SUMMER DRIVING SEASON.

Doug Noem: Now it really doesn't change anything as far as sales for the next 45 days. We've got time to make a decision of how we want to proceed in defending the E 15 usage.

BIOFUELS GROUPS ARE DECIDING IF THEY WILL APPEAL THE DECISION. PLUS, THEY'RE PUSHING FOR A PERMANENT LEGISLATIVE FIX.

SOIL HEALTH IS A BUZZWORD, ESPECIALLY WITH THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION'S PUSH FOR CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY. BUT I'M HERE AT A PROMINENT SOUTH DAKOTA OPERATION THAT HAS BEEN SEQUESTERING CARBON FOR OVER 30 YEARS.

THE JOHNSON FAMILY FARMS NEAR FRANKFORT AND HAS WON NUMEROUS AWARDS FOR THEIR CONSERVATION AND REGENERATIVE PRODUCTION PRACTICES. THE LATEST WAS BEING NAMED A REGIONAL NCBA ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP FINALIST.

THE SOUTH DAKOTA SOIL HEALTH COALITION HELD A FIELD DAY ON THEIR FARM THIS WEEK TO DISPLAY THESE PRACTICES SUCH AS USING COVER CROPS LIKE RYE AND PLANTING BEANS IN THE STUBBLE AFTER GRAZING OR TERMINATION.

Jamie: It all works together, it all plays into the next year together and so that's really our mentality is just having that holistic management approach.

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BRIAN SAYS THESE PRACTICES HAVE HELPED THEIR OPERATION BE MORE RESILIENT TO THIS YEAR'S DROUGHT.

Brian: In order to get through these dry years you have to have the water stored up in the soil and so by having a healthy living soil that has pore space you can essentially get through these tough times.

THEY ALSO DEMONSTRATED HOW THEY'VE CORRECTED SALINE AREAS IN WHEAT FIELDS THROUGH PLANTING FORAGE BARLEY FOLLOWED BY A COVER CROP. PLUS THEY'VE DEVELOPED GRASS WATERWAYS AND HAVE PLANTED TREES IN PASTURE STRIPS. THERE WAS A DEMONSTRATION OF A RAINFALL AND WIND SIMULATOR, AND JAMIE EVEN SHOWED OFF HER NO-TILL GARDEN.

LIKE MANY AROUND THE REGION, THIS WEEK'S CROP STOP FINDS THE AKER FARM IN NEED OF RAIN.

LARRY AKER AND HIS SON STEVE GROW CORN AND SOYBEANS NEAR WAUBAY, SOUTH DAKOTA. THEY ALSO BACKGROUND-FEED CATTLE IN THE WINTER AND SELL THEM IN THE SPRING.

HE SAYS THEY'VE ONLY RECEIVED ABOUT HALF OF NORMAL RAINFALL THIS SUMMER, BUT SO FAR HIS CROPS AND PASTURES ARE HANGING ON.

Larry Aker: WE GOT ABOUT FOUR INCHES REAL EARLY IN APRIL, YOU KNOW WE'D JUST KIND OF STARTED PUTTING THE CROPS IN. WAITeD A COUPLE OF WEEKS THEN TO GO AGAIN. SINCE THEN I THINK WE'VE MAYBE HAD THREE INCHES.

AKER SAYS THE WORST DROUGHT YEAR HE CAN REMEMBER IS 1976. SO FAR, THIS YEAR ISN'T NEARLY AS BAD AS THAT, ALTHOUGH HE SAYS WIND HAS CAUSED SIGNIFICANT SOIL EROSION.

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THE DROUGHT CONDITIONS ARE KEEPING CROP INSURANCE ADJUSTERS BUSY.

WITH A GENERAL DROUGHT AND ONLY OCCASIONAL RAINS, CROP INSURANCE CLIENTS ARE WEIGHING WHETHER TO KEEP CEREAL CROPS FOR A REDUCED GRAIN CROP, OR WHETHER THEY'RE LIKELY TO MAKE MORE MONEY TAKING IT FOR A FORAGE.

FRANK TSCHAKERT WORKS IN NORTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA. HE SAYS IN A NORMAL YEAR HE WOULD ONLY DO TWO OR THREE APPRAISALS ON SMALL GRAINS, BUT THIS YEAR HE'S BEEN DOING ABOUT FOUR A DAY. HE SAYS YIELD CALCULATIONS VARY WIDELY AROUND THE REGION. HE'S SEEING OATS AS LOW AS THREE BUSHELS AN ACRE, WITH AVERAGES AROUND TWENTY.

Frank Tschakert: WE'RE LOOKING AT SOME OATS AND WHEAT THAT FARMERS ARE WORRIED THAT THEY PROBABLY AREN'T GOING TO BE YIELDING ENOUGH TO JUSTIFY HARVESTING. THEY'VE GOT CATTLE, THE ALFALFA CROP WAS ABOUT A HALF A CROP ON THE FIRST CUTTING, AND THEY'RE WORRIED ABOUT GETTING FEED FOR CATTLE.

HE SAYS AT THIS POINT, THE CORN AND SOYBEANS STILL LOOK PRETTY GOOD.

A SOUTH DAKOTA FARMER WANTED A REMOTE-CONTROL BIN FAN SYSTEM, BUT HE DIDN'T WANT TO PAY $80,000 FOR IT, SO HE BUILT HIS OWN FOR A FRACTION OF THE COST.

ADAM EHLERS FARMS ABOUT 4,000 ACRES NEAR PRESHO. HIS CROPS INCLUDE WINTER WHEAT, SPRING WHEAT, SUNFLOWERS AND SOYBEANS.

EHLERS SAYS HE GOT TIRED OF FORGETTING TO TURN OFF HIS AERATION, ESPECIALLY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT.

HE HAS TEN GRAIN BINS, AND HE WAS GIVEN A QUOTE OF TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS EACH FOR A SYSTEM. WHICH WOULD ADD UP TO EIGHTY THOUSAND DOLLARS. BUT EHLERS BUILT IT HIMSELF FOR JUST ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS.

HE FOUND A SYSTEM ONLINE THAT'S HAS COMPONENTS DESIGNED TO CONTROL HUMIDITY IN HOMES AND ADAPTED IT TO HIS GRAIN BINS.

Adam Ehlers: I ALWAYS WANTED A WAY TO TURN OFF THE FANS FROM A SMART PHONE. I LOOKED INTO IT, IT WOULD COST ABOUT EIGHT THOUSAND DOLLARS TO DO A SYSTEM, I HAVE TEN BINS IN A ROW. TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS IS WHAT IT WOULD COST, AND I THOUGHT THERE HAS TO BE AN EASIER WAY TO GET THIS DONE.

EHLERS HAS AN ENGINEERING BACKGROUND. HE BUILT THE SYSTEM LAST YEAR, BUT HAS ADDED SOME IMPROVEMENTS THIS YEAR, INCLUDING A TEMPERATURE MONITOR FOR AIR BEING REMOVED FROM THE GRAIN BINS.

THE FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION HAS VOTED TO STRENGTHEN ENFORCEMENT OF THE MADE IN THE USA STANDARD. IT REQUIRES ALL MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS TO BE 100-PERCENT BORN, RAISED AND SLAUGHTERED IN THE U.S. TO QUALIFY FOR THE PRODUCT OF THE USA LABEL. USDA WILL ALSO WILL HOLD RULEMAKING TO ADDRESS CONCERNS THAT THE VOLUNTARY "PRODUCT OF USA" LABEL MAY CONFUSE CONSUMERS ABOUT THE ORIGIN OF MEAT PRODUCTS REGULATED BY FSIS.

A NEW BEEF PROCESSING PLANT HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED IN WESTERN IOWA. IT WILL BE LOCATED ABOUT 15 MILES SOUTH OF THE COUNCIL BLUFFS/OMAHA AREA.

A GROUP CALLED CATTLEMEN'S HERITAGE PLANS TO BUILD THE $325 MILLION FACILITY WITH A DAILY CAPACITY OF 1,500 HEAD. CONSTRUCTION BEGINS IN THE SPRING OF 2022 WITH PLANS TO OPEN BY LATE 2023.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, A SMALL-TOWN AG BUSINESS STAYS CLOSE TO ITS ROOTS.

WELCOME BACK.\u0009A LONGTIME AG COMPANY IS DETERMINED TO KEEP ITS RURAL NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA ROOTS.

EMILY BEAL HAS MORE ON AGVISE RESEARCH AND LABORATORIES, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Susan Lloyd: WE JUST STARTED WITH AN OLD TRACTOR AND MANY SHOVELS.

IN 1976 SUSAN LLOYD'S HUSBAND, DOCTOR EDWARD LLOYD, LEFT HIS JOB AT NDSU, TO OPEN AN AG CONSULTING COMPANY AND RESEARCH FARM IN NORTHWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA. SHORTLY AFTER THAT HE ALSO OPENED A LAB, WHICH PROVIDED PLANT ANALYSIS FOR CROP CONSULTANTS AND FERTILIZER RETAILERS. EDWARD DIED IN 2019, BUT SUSAN SAYS HIS VISION LIVES ON.

Susan Lloyd: HE WAS ALWAYS IN DEEP THOUGHT. HE RESEARCHED IT, HE THOUGHT ABOUT IT, AND THEN HE ACTED.

OVER THE YEARS, THE LLOYDS' CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN JOINED THE BUSINESS, AND IN 1994 PART OF THE COMPANY BECAME EMPLOYEE-OWNED.

SUSAN'S SON EDWARD WAS A POLICE OFFICER, BEFORE COMING BACK TO JOIN THE COMPANY.

Edward Lloyd: I LOVE THE FACT THAT WE CAN DO A VARIETY OF THINGS. IT DEFINITELY IS KIND OF THE SPICE OF LIFE I THINK.

COREY ZIMPRICH GREW UP NEAR NORTHWOOD, AND HE WAS HAPPY TO GET A JOB AS AN AGVISE COMPUTER PROGRAMMER FIVE YEARS AGO.

Cory Zimprich: I THINK THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE WHO GREW UP IN SMALL TOWNS WOULD LOVE TO BE ABLE TO COME BACK, YOU KNOW AND WORK IN A SMALL TOWN, USE THEIR DEGREES, USE THEIR EDUCATION. COME BACK AND YOU KNOW, IMPROVE WHERE THEY GREW UP.

IT HASN'T BEEN EASY. THE BUSINESS WAS DESTROYED BY FIRE IN 1996, AND A TORNADO IN 2007. BUT THEY REBUILT BOTH TIMES.

Jodie Boe: WE REALLY ARE COMMITTED TO NORTHWOOD AND THE RURAL COMMUNITY THAT WE'RE IN.

Emily Beal: THOUGH SOME AG RELATED BUSINESSES OFTEN MOVE TO LARGER CITIES, BOTH AGVISE RESEARCH AND AGVISE LABORATORIES ARE DEDICATED TO PLANTING THEIR ROOTS IN RURAL NORTH DAKOTA. WITH AGWEEK, I'M EMILY BEAL IN NORTHWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA.

AGVISE HAS A SECOND LOCATION IN BENSON, MINNESOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

THERE'S A SHORTAGE OF AG EDUCATION TEACHERS ACROSS THE U.S., SO MANY SCHOOLS THAT WOULD LIKE TO HAVE AN AG PROGRAM AND FFA CHAPTER ARE NOT ABLE TO.

BUT NORTH DAKOTA IS BUCKING THAT TREND, DUE IN PART TO A FAST-GROWING NUMBER OF WOMEN TEACHING AG. ROSE DUNN TALKED TO SEVERAL AG TEACHERS, WHO ARE ALSO NEW MOMS, AT THE STATE FFA CONVENTION.

TWO-MONTH-OLD EMILY ZAHRADKA WON'T REMEMBER HER FIRST FFA CONVENTION. BUT HER MOM MOLLY SAYS IT WON'T BE HER LAST. EMILY IS ONE OF ABOUT A DOZEN BABIES BORN THIS YEAR TO NORTH DAKOTA AG TEACHERS. THAT BABY BOOM IS DUE, IN PART, TO A BOOM IN FEMALE AG TEACHERS IN THE STATE.

Molly Zahradka:I THINK WITH THE RISE IN WOMEN AG TEACHERS, LIKE WITH ONE COMES THE OTHER. THERE'S GOING TO BE MORE BABIES AT THE SAME TIME, SO IT'S KIND OF FUN THAT THEY'LL ALL GET TO COME TO EVENTS TOGETHER, THEN WHEN THEY'RE GROWN UP THEY'LL BE COMPETING AGAINST EACH OTHER.

MOLLY ZAHDARKA STARTED THE AG PROGRAM IN GRAFTON FIVE YEARS AGO. IN FACT, 49-PERCENT OF THE STATE'S AG TEACHERS ARE WOMEN. THAT'S UP FROM JUST ONE OR TWO JUST A FEW DECADES AGO.

Macey Kleinjan: IT'S JUST A FAMILY.

MACEY KLEINJAN IS HAPPY TO HAVE HER TWO-MONTH OLD SON NOAH WITH HER AT THE STATE CONVENTION. ALTHOUGH SHE GREW UP ON A FARM, SHE PLANNED TO TEACH ENGLISH, UNTIL SHE FOUND OUT THERE WAS MUCH MORE CALL FOR AG TEACHERS.

Macey Kleinjan: I CAN'T IMAGINE MYSELF BEING ANYWHERE ELSE THAN TEACHING AGRICULTURE IN NORTH DAKOTA. WE HAVE SUCH A GREAT COMMUNITY OF AG TEACHERS. THEY WERE SO HELPFUL IN PLANNING MY MATERNITY LEAVE, EVEN.

Anna Kemmer: MAGGIE'S BEEN COMING TO SCHOOL, THIS IS LIKE DAY TEN OF MAGGIE SCHOOL.

OAKES AG TEACHER, AND NEW MOM TO MAGGIE, ANNA KEMMER AGREES THAT SUPPORT FROM THEIR SCHOOLS AND STUDENTS, AS THEY JUGGLE TEACHING AND PARENTING DUTIES HAS BEEN VITAL TO THEIR SUCCESS AT BOTH. AND KEMMER SAYS WHILE THERE ARE STILL SOME STEREOTYPES TO OVERCOME, THERE'S ROOM FOR MORE WOMEN IN AG CLASSROOMS.

Anna Kemmer: I THINK WOMEN IN AG ARE DEFINITELY MORE, WELL, BETTER PERCEIVED, COMING THROUGH THE YEARS HERE NOW, BUT IT'S SOMETHING WE JUST HAVE TO PUT OUR HEADS DOWN AND KEEP GOING AND KEEP PUSHING FORWARD AND KEEP ENCOURAGING THAT YOUNGER GENERATION OF WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE TO KEEP GOING.

Molly Zahradka:GOOD JOB EMMY, YOU STAYED ASLEEP THE WHOLE TIME.

IN FARGO, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TELL YOU ABOUT SOME NEW AG TECHNOLOGY DESIGNED TO MAKE YOUR SPRAYING MORE EFFICIENT.

AND LATER, WEATHER TAKES A TOLL ON THE STRAWBERRY CROP THIS YEAR.

THE NORTHWESTERN CORN BELT GOT SOME MUCH NEEDED RAIN THIS WEEK ACCOMPANIED BY COOLER TEMPERATURES. WILL THERE BE ANY FOLLOWUP?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

SPRAYING IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT JOBS ON THE FARM, BUT IT CAN ALSO BE ONE OF THE TRICKIEST.

AS ROSE DUNN SHOWS US, A FARGO AG TECH COMPANY IS ABOUT TO UNVEIL A BREAKTHROUGH IN SPRAY TECHNOLOGY.

<JOINING US NOW IS JOE HEILMAN WITH INTELLIGENT AG IN FARGO, AN TODAY WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT JOBS ON THE FARM, WOULD YOU SAY, SPRAYING.

Joe Heilman: YEAH, SPRAYING. I MEAN, IT'S SUCH A CRITICAL PIECE TO MODERN AGRICULTURE. IT'S ONE OF THE MOST COMMONLY USED MACHINES ON THE FARM TODAY. IT'S DEVILISHLY DIFFICULT TO UNDERSTAND IF YOU HAVE ANY KIND OF PERFORMANCE PROBLEMS AT THE NOZZLE. BECAUSE TYPICALLY THE ONLY TOOL WE HAVE TODAY IS TO VISUALLY CHECK.

BUT INTELLIGENT AG HAS BEEN WORKING ON THAT.

Joe Heilman: YEAH, WE'VE BEEN STUDYING THIS ISSUE FOR THE LAST THREE OR FOUR YEARS. REALLY TRY TO UNDERSTAND IF IT REALLY MATTERS, AND WE'RE ACTUALLY GOING TO HAVE AN EVENT ON JULY 22ND, WHERE WE HAVE ABOUT 160 DIFFERENT PLOT AREAS, WHERE WE'RE STUDYING THE EFFECT OF NOZZLE PERFORMANCE ON THE EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS SO COME ON OUT WITH US THE AFTERNOON OF JULY 22ND AT ONE-THIRTY. WE'RE GOING TO HAVE KIND OF INTERACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS. WE'RE GOING TO TAKE YOU THROUGH PLOT TOURS, AND THEN PRESENT TO YOU AND ANNOUNCE A NEW SOLUTION THAT WE'RE COMING UP WITH TO HELP MANAGE SPRAY QUALITY.

AND WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES AROUND DROPLET SIZE MANAGEMENT?

Joe Heilman: YEAH SO I THINK WHEN YOU LOOK AT THESE CHARTS FROM THESE NOZZLE MANUFACTURERS, IN A LOT OF CASES, EVERY NOZZLE TIP ITSELF CAN PRODUCE BETWEEN FOUR AND FIVE DROPLET SIZE RANGES. WHAT WE'RE TRYING TO DO IS HELP GIVE YOU REAL TIME INFORMATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF YOUR NOZZLES, SO THAT YOU CAN UNDERSTAND ALL THE DECISIONS YOU'RE MAKING WHEN YOU'RE OPERATING THAT PIECE OF MACHINERY, WHAT IMPACT IS IT HAVING ON MY SPRAY QUALITY PERFORMANCE?

FARMERS SPEND A LOT OF MONEY ON SPRAY, YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT IT'S EFFECTIVE.

Joe Heilman: THAT'S RIGHT, YEAH. WE WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT YOUR SPRAY APPLICATIONS ARE GETTING DONE TO THE ABSOLUTE BEST OF YOUR ABILITIES, AND WE'RE GOING TO HAVE A NEW TO HELP YOU MANAGE THAT.

ALL RIGHT, THANKS. JOE HEILMAN JOINING US TODAY WITH INTELLIGENT AG.

THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY WILL BE UNVEILED ON JULY 22ND AT THE GRAND FARM, SOUTH OF FARGO. YOU CAN ATTEND VIRTUALLY OR IN PERSON. GO TO SPRAY ON TARGET.COM TO REGISTER.

A FORMER AG SECRETARY IS NOW AN AUTHOR. DAN GLICKMAN TALKS ABOUT HIS NEW BOOK, AFTER THIS.

FORMER U.S. AG SECRETARY DAN GLICKMAN HAS A NEW BOOK OUT, DETAILING HIS YEARS IN WASHINGTON, AND BEYOND.

GLICKMAN, A DEMOCRAT, REPRESENTED KANSAS IN THE U.S. HOUSE FOR 18 YEARS. HE SERVED AS U.S. AG SECRETARY FROM 1995 TO 2001 IN THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION.

GLICKMAN WASN'T RAISED ON A FARM, BUT HE SAYS HIS SUCCESS ON THE AG COMMITTEE AND AS SECRETARY, COMES FROM AN ABILITY TO LISTEN, COMMUNICATE IDEAS, AND TO COMPROMISE.

THE BOOK IS CALLED "LAUGHING AT MYSELF: MY EDUCATION IN CONGRESS, ON THE FARM, AND AT THE MOVIES."

HE SAYS HE'S CONCERNED ABOUT INCREASING PARTISANSHIP IN POLITICS, AND CONSOLIDATION IN AG. BUT HE SAYS THERE ARE POSITIVE TRENDS AS WELL.

Dan Glickman: IN THE LAST COUPLE, TWO OR THREE YEARS, THERE ARE ACTUALLY MORE SMALLER FARMERS COMING INTO THE BUSINESS OF AGRICULTURE. THERE'S A LOT OF INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN AGRICULTURE. THE FARM BILLS HAVE BEEN CHANGED A BIT TO ALLOW MORE FLEXIBILITY IN PLANTING DECISIONS.

GLICKMAN WENT ON TO BE CEO OF THE MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA.

IT'S BEEN A TOUGH YEAR FOR MANY CROPS, INCLUDING STRAWBERRIES.

IN FACT, SOME YOU-PICK STRAWBERRY FARMS IN THE REGION WERE NOT ABLE TO OPEN THIS YEAR.

KRIS AND CORDELL HUEBSCH OWN OTTER BERRY FARM IN OTTER TAIL COUNTY MINNESOTA. THEY ALSO RUN A DIVERSIFIED CROP FARM.

A MEMORIAL WEEKEND FREEZE AND THEN AN EARLY STRETCH OF EXTREME HEAT CUT THEIR CROP BY FORTY PERCENT, SO THEY'RE HAPPY TO HAVE A CROP AT ALL. BUT THEY DID HAVE TO SHORTEN THE NUMBER OF DAYS THEY WERE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC THIS YEAR.

Kris Huebsch: WE'RE JUST REALLY THANKFUL THAT WE DID HAVE, YOU KNOW, SOMEWHAT OF A CROP, AND THAT, YOU KNOW, WE CAN STILL PROVIDE STUFF FOR PEOPLE. AND YOU KNOW, WE'LL BE HERE NEXT YEAR.

OTTER BERRY FARMS ALSO OFFERS A CORN MAZE AND PUMPKIN PATCH IN THE FALL.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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