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AgweekTV Full Show: Drought outlook, farm satellite photo products, Palmer amaranth, hot sauce

This week on AgweekTV, we ask an expert what we can expect in terms of drought coming back to the region. We'll see how farm satellite photos are being brought to life. Palmer amaranth continues to spread in North Dakota, but there's a new effort to bring it to zero. And we'll visit a local business that is bringing the heat to the upper Midwest.

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This week on AgweekTV, we ask an expert what we can expect in terms of drought coming back to the region. We'll see how farm satellite photos are being brought to life. Palmer amaranth continues to spread in North Dakota, but there's a new effort to bring it to zero. And we'll visit a local business that is bringing the heat to the upper Midwest.

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StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says that after the first significant winter storm of the season, winter has arrived, with snow and cold sticking around. But at least right now, Thanksgiving looks likely to be dry.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV I'M EMILY BEAL. OUR WET SPRING BROUGHT WELCOME DROUGHT RELIEF. BUT NOW, A LARGE PART OF THE REGION IS BACK IN DROUGHT STATUS. I TALKED TO DARYL RITCHISON, THE DIRECTOR OF THE NORTH DAKOTA AG WEATHER NETWORK, TO SEE HOW DRY THE REGION ACTUALLY IS, AND DISCUSS THE WINTER WEATHER OUTLOOK.

SO DARYL, HOW IS THE REGION SITTING IN TERMS OF MOISTURE?

DARYL: MOST OF THE STATE, NOT ALL THAT WELL. WE HAVE SOIL MOISTURE PROBES WITH NDAWN THROUGHOUT THE STATE DOWN TO 40 INCHES AND MOST LOCATIONS ARE DRY THROUGH RIGHT. ONCE YOU GET DOWN TO THE LOWER DEPTH, STILL QUITE A BIT OF WATER FROM THE RAIN AND OR SNOW FROM LAST SPRING BUT REALLY I'D SAY THAT TOP FOOT HAS DRIED OFF QUITE A BIT. I WILL SAY THE SNOW STORM AND RAIN SYSTEM FROM EARLIER IN THE WEEK DID BRING QUITE A BIT OF RAIN. THERE'S SOME PARTS OF WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA THAT GOT ONE TO THREE INCHES OF RAIN, BUT REALLY THAT WAS ABOUT MAYBE TWENTY PERCENT OF THE STATE THE OTHER EIGHTY PERCENT REALLY DID NOT GET MUCH MOISTURE FROM THAT PARTICULAR SYSTEM.

EMILY: SO WOULD YOU SAY THERE IS ANY COMPARISON BETWEEN THE MONTHS THAT WE'RE EXPERIENCING NOW AND THE FALL OF 2020?

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DARYL: IN MANY WAYS YOU COULD SAY YES, THE FALL OF 2020 ALSO HAD A PRECIPITATION EVENT BUT IT DID NOT TRIGGER MUCH OF THE STATE. SO IF YOU WANT TO MAKE THAT COMPARISON, YOU COULD BECAUSE THE CONDITIONS ARE SIMILAR, BUT THE REASONS IT OCCURED THEN OVER WHAT IS CAUSING IT NOW TO ME IS A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT.

EMILY: SO AS WE'RE HEADING INTO THOSE WINTER MONTHS, DO YOU THINK THERE ARE GOING TO BE TURBULENT WINTER STORMS LIKE WE EXPERIENCED LAST YEAR?

DARYL: WELL HERE'S THE THING, LAST YEAR THE UPPER LEVEL WIND FLOW WAS PRETTY STAGNANT AND REALLY ALL WE HAD WAS A BUNCH OF ALBERTA CLIPPERS. WE GET ALBERTA CLIPPERS EVERY WINTER IT'S JUST THAT THE STORM TRACK LAST YEAR WAS PERFECT. SO INSTEAD OF GETTING LIKE ONE OR TWO BAD ALBERTA CLIPPERS, WE HAD EIGHT, NINE, TEN OF THEM. AND SO THE ODDS OF THAT HAPPENING TWO WINTERS IN A ROW ARE QUITE LOW. BUT AGAIN THE STORM FROM EARLIER THIS WEEK, ALTHOUGH NOT AN ALBERTA CLIPPER, STILL TRIGGERED A LOT OF WIND. AGAIN WE LIVE IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS SO YOU SHOULD ANTICIPATE SOME OF THAT. WE GET IT ALMOST EVERY WINTER, BUT TO THE DEGREE OF LAST YEAR I WOULD BE A LITTLE BIT SURPRISED IF WE DID. BUT THAT STILL MEANS WE'RE PROBABLY GOING TO GET TWO OR THREE.

EMILY: SO WOULD YOU SAY THE REGION IS IN NEED OF ONE LARGE WEATHER EVENT TO KIND OF HELP WITH THE MOISTURE ISSUE?

DARYL: CONTRARY TO SOMETIMES WHAT MOST PEOPLE BELIEVE, YOU DON'T GET A LOT OF ABSORPTION THROUGH WINTER SNOWFALL INTO THE SOIL., MOST OF IT ENDS UP RUNNING AWAY. SO IF WE'RE REALLY GOING TO REPLENISH THE MOISTURE, IT'S PROBABLY GOING TO OCCUR NEXT SPRING, AFTER THE MELT NOT NECESSARILY WHAT'S GOING TO OCCUR THIS WINTER BECAUSE AGAIN I WILL EMPHASIZE NOT MUCH OF THAT ENDS UP INTO THE SOIL OUTSIDE THE TOP INCH OR TWO.

EMILY: IT'S MOST CERTAINLY GOING TO BE AN INTERESTING COUPLE OF MONTHS. DARYL RITCHISON, DIRECTOR OF NDAWN.

ONE WEED EXPERT SAYS NORTH DAKOTA NEEDS TO GO FOR ABSOLUTE ZERO ON PALMER AMARANTH.

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THE WEED CAN DEVASTATE YIELDS. THE PREDICTION IS THAT IF NORTH DAKOTA DOESN'T KEEP THE NOXIOUS WEED OUT OF THE STATE NOW, IT WILL TRIPLE COSTS FOR WEED CONTROL IN CROPS LIKE CORN AND SOYBEANS. IT WILL DOUBLE THE COSTS FOR SUGARBEETS, WHERE WEED CONTROL COSTS ARE ALREADY GREATER.

TOM PETERS WORKS IN WEED MANAGEMENT AT NDSU AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION SERVICE. HE SAYS AN EDUCATIONAL CAMPAIGN SEEMS TO BE WORKING. ALTHOUGH PALMER HAS NOW SPREAD TO NINETEEN COUNTIES IN THE STATE, PETERS SAYS THEY'RE FINDING A FEW PLANTS IN FIELDS, NOT ACRES AND ACRES.

Tom Peters: IF WE DO NOTHING WE'RE GOING TO SEE PALMER AMARANTH SPREAD TO MORE COUNTIES AND UNFORTUNATELY SOONER OR LATER WE'RE GOING TO WIND UP WITH WIDE SWATHS OF PALMER AMARANTH, FIELDS THAT HAVE MANY PLANTS INSTEAD OF A FEW PLANTS, AND THEN WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO START CHANGING OUR WEED MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS, AND THAT'S GOING TO GET EXPENSIVE FOR OUR PRODUCERS.

PETERS SAYS THE FOCUS SHOULD NOW SHIFT TO CATTLE PRODUCERS, TO UNDERSTAND THE CONSEQUENCES OF BUYING SCREENINGS, ESPECIALLY SUNFLOWERS, EMBEDDED WITH PIGWEED SEEDS, INCLUDING PALMER AMARANTH.

A MINNESOTA COMPANY IS BRANCHING OUT FROM TOMATOES, TO OTHER PRODUCE. BUSHEL BOY FARMS HAS GROWN TOMATOES YEAR-ROUND FOR MORE THAN THIRTY YEARS, BUT NOW THE SOUTHERN MINNESOTA COMPANY IS EXPANDING.

Chuck Tryon: WE PRIDE OURSELVES IN BEING A MIDWEST LOCAL PRODUCER.

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BUSHEL BOY FARMS WAS STARTED IN 1990 WITH ONE GOAL...

Chuck Tryon: BACKYARD GARDEN QUALITY TOMATOES YEAR-ROUND IN A CLIMATE LIKE MINNESOTA.

BUSHEL BOY PRODUCES ABOUT SIXTY THOUSAND POUNDS OF TOMATOES EVERY DAY. AND NOW, IT'S THE FIRST MINNESOTA COMPANY TO PRODUCE CUCUMBERS YEAR ROUND. BUSHEL BOY FARMS PRESIDENT CHUCK TRYON SAYS THE COMPANY WILL PRODUCE ALMOST A MILLION POUNDS OF CUCUMBERS BY THE END OF THE YEAR.

Chuck Tryon: WE HAD THE IN-HOUSE EXPERIENCE, AND WE HAD A CUSTOMER BASE THAT WAS ASKING US FOR WHAT ELSE WE CAN BRING THEM YEAR-ROUND THAT RIGHT NOW THEY HAVE TO GENERALLY IMPORT FROM EITHER MEXICO OR FROM CANADA. SO THIS WAS AN OPPORTUNITY WHERE WE COULD TRY A CROP THAT GROWS IN THE EXACT SAME INFRASTRUCTURE THAT TOMATOES GROW IN, SO IT WAS AN EASY THING TO INSERT INTO OUR GREENHOUSE.

AND NOW, THEIR FIRST CUCUMBER HARVEST IS UNDERWAY.

Chuck Tryon: WE CAN HAVE OUR PRODUCT THAT WE PICKED TODAY CAN BE IN A STORE TOMORROW AND THAT'S THE BENEFIT OF BEING A GOOD LOCAL SUPPLIER, AND REALLY TAKING MILES OFF THE FOOD CHAIN.

IN ADDITION, THE COMPANY STARTED GROWING STRAWBERRIES A FEW YEARS AGO, IN A SMALL-SCALE TRIAL. THEY GROW THEIR PRODUCE IN FIFTY ACRES OF HIGH-TECH GREENHOUSES IN MINNESOTA AND IOWA. BUSHEL BOY KEEPS BEE HIVES IN THE GREENHOUSES FOR POLLINATION. THE COMPANY ALSO PRIDES ITSELF ON THE EFFICIENT USE OF WATER. TRYON SAYS IT ALL ADDS UP TO BETTER PRODUCE.

Chuck Tryon: SO PRODUCTS THAT ARE COMING EITHER FROM THE WEST COAST, OR FROM MEXICO OR CANADA ARE BEING PICKED BEFORE THEY FULLY RIPEN AND THE FLAVOR FULLY DEVELOPS. SO OUR BUSINESS MODEL ALLOWS US TO HARVEST IT WHEN IT'S EXACTLY RIPE, READY FOR A CONSUMER TO EXPERIENCE.

TRYON SAYS THERE ARE PLANS TO EXPAND THROUGHOUT THE MIDWEST.

HOW WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR FARM ON A RUG OR WALL HANGING? A NORTH DAKOTA BUSINESS CAN MAKE IT FOR YOU. THE STORY'S COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV,

SOME SOYBEANS ARE SHOWING UP WITH OFF COLORS. WHILE THAT'S NOT AN INDICATOR OF POOR QUALITY, SOME ASIAN EXPORT MARKETS ARE DISCOUNTING THE OFF-COLOR BEANS.

SOYBEANS IN THE U.S. ARE OFTEN GRADED AS YELLOW, BUT A GROWING NUMBER ARE SHOWING UP WITH A SEED COAT THAT'S MORE BROWN OR GRAY.

EXTENSION SPECIALIST SETH NAEVE SAYS THE PROBLEM APPEARS TO BE WITH ENLIST E3 SOYBEANS. HE SAYS IT DOESN'T SEEM TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN QUALITY OR NUTRITIONAL VALUE, BUT IT IS IMPORTANT TO SOME BUYERS.

NAEVE WANTS GROWERS TO BE AWARE THERE IS A POTENTIAL ISSUE OUT THERE.

Seth Naeve: I'D JUST SAY THIS IS ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF THE RISK THAT WE HAVE WHEN FARMERS REALLY EMPHASIZE BUYING THE NEWEST AND BEST VARIETIES. WHEN THEY GO OUT AND ALWAYS PURCHASE THE NEW STUFF, THEN THEY'RE AT GREATER RISK OF HAVING SOME OF THESE KINDS OF ISSUES.

U.S.D. A. DATA SHOWS THE AVERAGE PERCENT OF SOYBEANS OF OTHER COLORS DOUBLED, FROM HALF A PERCENT A YEAR AGO TO ONE PERCENT THIS YEAR. WHILE THE NUMBER REMAINS SMALL, IT'S THE FIRST INCREASE IN MORE THAN A DECADE.

YOU PROBABLY KNOW KIDS WHO LOVE TO PLAY WITH THEIR TOY CARS ON A RUG PATTERNED WITH A TOWN OR RACETRACK. BUT NOW, THEY CAN PLAY WITH THEIR FARM TOYS ON A REPLICA OF YOUR FARM.

AGWEEK TV'S MIKKEL PATES JOINS US NOW WITH MORE ON A NORTH DAKOTA COMPANY THAT'S MAKING CARPET FARMS, IN THIS WEEK'S COVER STORY.

"BOUNDRI" IS A NEW NOVELTY COMPANY THAT CAN PUT YOUR FARM'S SATELLITE OR AERIAL IMAGE ON A PLAY RUG, OR TURN IT INTO WALL ART.

Put the grain in the combine.

TODAYS RURAL KIDDOS MAY SOMEDAY BE GROWING CROPS OR RAISING LIVESTOCK ON THIS LAND IN REAL LIFE, BUT FOR NOW, THEY'RE PLAYING ON A AREA RUG-SIZE VERSION OF THEIR FAMILY FARM.

Should we dump the grain in the grain bin?

NATHAN FALIEDE RECENTLY STARTED "BOUNDRI" AS A BRAND FOR NOVELTY ART ITEMS USING REMOTE AERIAL IMAGERY. BOUNDRI STARTED BY OFFERING GENERIC FARM PRINT RUGS THIS MONTH, AND WILL START PRODUCING CUSTOM PRODUCTS NEXT MONTH, JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS.

Nathan Faleide: specially the farm rugs, they're such a kind of unique and alluring product, for kids to play on their own dad's farm. I mean, what's not to like about it?

FALIEDE'S DAD LANNIE FALIEDE HAS BEEN AN INNOVATOR IN SATELLITE IMAGERY FOR PRECISION AG, WITH HIS COMPANY SAT SHOT. NATHAN WORKED WITH, AND HELD MANAGEMENT POSTS IN THE COMPANY FOR SEVERAL YEARS, BEFORE BRANCHING OUT INTO OTHER AREAS, INCLUDING THIS ARTISTIC USE OF THE TECHNOLOGY.

Nathan Faleide: NO ONE WAS REALLY DOING THAT ON A LARGE SCALE, AND A MORE EFFICIENT SCALE, SO I GOT SOME FEEDBACK AND EVERYONE WAS PRETTY RECEPTIVE TO IT.

What comes out of these cows? Milk? Milk! Do you like milk? How about this one? Is this a chicken? Do you like chickens? I like chickens. Bok Bok Bok!

THE RUGS COME IN STANDARD SIZES, UP TO NINE BY TWELVE.

Nathan Faleide: It's not going to be to exact scale, but I don't think most kids really care.

IF YOU DON'T HAVE A SPECIAL PIECE OF LAND YOU WANT PICTURED, FALEIDE HAS SOME GENERIC DESIGNS TO CHOOSE FROM. THE RUGS ARE WASHABLE, AND CAN BE FOLDED UP TO PUT AWAY. THE COMPANY ALSO OFFERS PIECES OF VINYL AND OTHER MATERIALS TO BE HUNG UP ON THE WALL AS ART OR WHITEBOARD TYPE WORK GUIDES FOR A REAL FARM. FALEIDE SAYS THE SKY'S THE LIMIT ABOUT WHAT THEY CAN PRINT A FARM IMAGE ON, INCLUDING PILLOWS, BLANKETS, MUGS, AND BOOKLETS.

Nathan Faleide: THERE'S A PLETHORA OF THINGS YOU CAN PRINT, SO I'M JUST TRYING TO BRING ALL THOSE THINGS TO HOW PEOPLE WANT THEM, AND HAVE THEIR OWN UNIQUE KIND OF AREA OF THE WORLD THAT THEY WANT TO PRINT.>

BOUNDRI IS CURRENTLY FOCUSING ON LAND IN THE U.S AND CANADA, BUT COULD EXPAND TO EUROPE, AUSTRALIA AND BRAZIL IN THE COMING YEARr.

THANKS MIKKEL. YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE, INCLUDING INFORMATION ON ORDERING, IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A LOCALLY MADE HOT SAUCE IS TURNING UP THE HEAT WITH CHILIS GROWN BY LOCAL FARMERS.

WILL THE WEATHER REMAIN FAVORABLE AS FARMERS CONTINUE THEIR HARVEST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

CHANCES ARE CHILIS AND JALAPENOS AREN'T THE FIRST THING THAT COME TO MIND WHEN THINKING ABOUT WHAT CROPS ARE GROWN IN THE REGION. BUT ONE COUPLE IS CHANGING ALL THAT. I VISITED OFF THE DECK HOT SAUCE IN FARGO, WHO'S BRINGING THE HEAT TO THE MIDWEST.

Rachel Utechet : Our business started on our deck, it's grown since then so we're off the deck. Which is why our brand is off the deck

RACHEL UTECHET AND HER HUSBAND JEREMIAH HAD BEEN GROWING A VARIETY OF CHILLIES RIGHT OFF THEIR DECK WHEN THEY DECIDED TO TAKE A SHOT AT FEREMENTING THEIR OWN CHILLIES INTO HOT SAUCE.

Rachel: My husband was reading about fermentation, he's a nerd. He kept talking about it, he found some chilies and we were growing some chilies on our deck Wanted to try making hot sauce and so he set up a batch and we tried it a month later. It was amazing, and it was so good I knew we had to share it with the world.

IN 2016 THEY BEGAN SELLING OFF THE DECK HOT SAUCE. BUT TO KEEP UP WITH DEMAND THEY STARTED WORKING WITH LOCAL FARMERS WHO GREW CHILIS RIGHT IN THE RED RIVER VALLEY.

Jeremiah Utechet : We started to learn about the agriculture up here and how chili peppers grow and it turned out we grow some delicious chilis up here.

OFF THE DECK HOT SAUCE IS PRODUCED, PROCESSED AND PACKAGED IN THE RED RIVER VALLEY. IT WAS IMPORTANT THAT THEY USE PRODUCE GROWN IN THE AREA AND HELP SUPPORT LOCAL GROWERS.

Jeremiah: It would have been about four years ago we started approaching growers and one of them decided yeah I'd like to try growing jalapenos for you and it turned out super good so we slowly brought on more and more farmers.

THIS HARVEST SEASON, OFF THE DECK RECIEVED 500-700 POUNDS OF PRODUCE EACH WEEK. THEY SAID THIS WAS THEIR MOST PLENTIFUL HARVEST TO DATE. THEIR HOT SAUCE HAS FARED WELL AT NATIONAL COMPETITIONS, AND SURPRISES FELLOW HOT SAUCE MAKERS BY THE HEAT IN THEIR PRODUCT.

Rachel: There's a surprise there, and there's also the surprise that it's actually, it has some heat. because there's kind of this assumption that you know mayo is spicy, ketchup is spicy here. That like midwest can't do heat at all.

OFF THE DECK HAS A DOZEN HOT SAUCE VARIETIES AND IS SOLD IN LOCAL RETAIL SHOPS AND ONLINE.

STILL AHEAD, ONE NORTH DAKOTA COUNTY HAS A LOTS OF 4-H'ERS GOING FOR NATIONAL HONORS...

BEING A DELEGATE TO THE 4-H NATIONAL CONGRESS OR ITS NATIONAL CONFERENCE IS A RARE HONOR. BUT THIS YEAR, THE WALSH COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA 4-H HAS FOUR DELEGATES GOING TO THOSE EVENTS.

THREE NORTH DAKOTA STUDENTS WILL BE ATTENDING THE NATIONAL 4-H CONGRESS IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA IN NOVEMBER, AS NATIONAL AMBASSADORS. ANDREW MYRDAL'S BEEN IN FOUR-H FOR NINE YEARS.

MYRDAL HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN MANY FOUR-H ACTIVITIES, BUT HE SAYS HE LOVES THE COMMUNITY SERVICE ASPECT OF BEING AN AMBASSADOR.

Andrew Myrdal: JUST GO AROUND TO DIFFERENT COUNTY SHOWS AND COUNTY FAIRS, HELP OUT AT THE STATE FAIR, WE ALSO AS AMBASSADORS HAVE RETREATS WHERE WE GO AND DO COMMUNITY SERVICE. // AT THOSE EVENTS WE ALSO DO LEADERSHIP BUILDING ACTIVITIES.

THE SELECTION COMMITTEE FOR THE NATIONAL EVENTS LOOKS AT THE APPLICANTS' ENGAGEMENT IN FOUR-H, AND THEIR COMMUNITIES AT THE LOCAL, STATE AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AMILIA LILLEHAUGEN SAYS 4-H HAS HELPED HER DEVELOP SOCIAL SKILLS.

Amilia Lillehaugen: JUST A LOT OF TALKING TO PEOPLE. BEFORE I HAD A LOT OF LIKE SOCIAL ANXIETY, AND IT'S HELPED A LOT WITH THAT.

HANNAL MYRDAL IS A DELEGATE TO THE NATIONAL 4-H CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON D.C. IN APRIL.

Hannah Myrdal: COMMUNICATION IN 4-H IS VERY IMPORTANT. YOU DO IT IN ALMOST EVERY PROJECT YOU DO. YOU INTERVIEW WITH JUDGES, YOU TALK IN FRONT OF LARGE GROUPS OF PEOPLE.

Brad Brummond: FOR ME PERSONALLY IT'S A PASSION OF MINE.

WALSH COUNTY EXTENSION AGENT BRAD BRUMMOND HAS HELPED COACH 4-H KIDS FOR MORE THAN THIRTY YEARS. THE COUNTY HAS A STRONG HISTORY OF 4-H AMBASSADORS. BRUMMOND SAYS IT'S THANKS TO THE STRONG 4-H PROGRAM IN THE COUNTY. IN FACT, HE DOESN'T KNOW OF ANOTHER CLUB IN THE STATE THAT HAS SENT FOUR MEMBERS TO NATIONAL EVENTS.

Brad Brummond: IT'S BECAUSE OF THE QUALITY OF OUR YOUNG YOUTH, THE QUALITY OF OUR PARENTS, IT'S THE QUALITY OF OUR 4-H LEADERS. AND I LIKE TO THINK THE EXTENSION OFFICE HAS A LITTLE BIT TO DO WITH THAT.

Andrew Myrdal: IT'S JUST A GREAT ORGANIZATION TO BE PART OF.

FOUR OTHER NORTH DAKOTA 4-H MEMBERS WERE ALSO CHOSEN TO ATTEND TO ATTEND THE NATIONAL CONGRESS AND NATIONAL CONFERENCE AS DELEGATES.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

MINNESOTA CORN GROWERS ARE LOOKING TO FUND RESEARCH PROJECTS AND SUGARBEET HARVEST OFFICIALLY WRAPS UP IN THE REGION.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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