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AgweekTV Full Show: Corn and Soybean Tour, rye revival, Dakotafest, WOTUS at SCOTUS

This week on AgweekTV, we'll kick off our Agweek 2022 Corn and Soybean Crop Tour. NDSU's revived rye seed development could give producers another cover crop option. We'll you get you caught up on the big topics at Dakotafest in Mitchell, South Dakota. And the Supreme Court looks to make a ruling on federal water regulation.

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This week on AgweekTV, we'll kick off our Agweek 2022 Corn and Soybean Crop Tour. NDSU's revived rye seed development could give producers another cover crop option. We'll you get you caught up on the big topics at Dakotafest in Mitchell, South Dakota. And the Supreme Court looks to make a ruling on federal water regulation.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

SOUTH DAKOTA'S LARGEST FARM SHOW TOOK PLACE THIS WEEK.

MORE THAN 20-THOUSAND PEOPLE MAKE THE ANNUAL TREK TO MITCHELL FOR DAKOTAFEST TO LEARN, SEE, AND CONNECT THROUGH AGRICULTURE.

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ONE OF THE PANEL DISCUSSIONS AT DAKOTAFEST COVERED THE PROSPECT OF A WEB OF PIPELINES TO CARRY EXCESS CARBON DIOXIDE FROM 32 ETHANOL PLANTS IN THE MIDWEST, TO A PERMANENT HOME IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

MIKKEL PATES WAS IN MITCHELL AND HAS MORE.

Mikkel Pates: ONE OF THE BIG DAKOTAFEST TOPICS THIS YEAR WAS CARBON DIOXIDE PIPELINES. THEY HAVE BIG BENEFITS FOR THE ETHANOL INDUSTRY, BUT SOME DRAWBACKS FOR LANDOWNERS.

Jay Poindexter: I DON'T THINK FOR-PROFIT COMPANIES SHOULD HAVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE YOUR LAND FROM EMINENT DOMAIN.

JAY POINDEXTER FARMS AND RUNS A COW-CALF OPERATION. HE'S AMONG THE LANDOWNERS AT THE FORUM WHO EXPRESSED CONCERNS ABOUT THE PIPELINES. HE'S CONCERNED ABOUT COMPANIES TAKING CONTROL THROUGH EMINENT DOMAIN, BUT ALSO ABOUT THE SAFETY OF THE PIPELINE .

Jay Poindexter: I VISITED WITH A GENTLEMAN FROM MILLETTE YESTERDAY, AND THE PIPELINE RUNS THREE HUNDRED FEET FROM HIS BROTHER'S HOUSE, AND FIVE HUNDRED FEET FROM THEIR FEEDLOT. IF YOU HAD A RUPTURE RIGHT THERE, NOBODY WOULD EVER KNOW IT, BECAUSE ALL YOU'RE GOING TO DO IS COLLECT THE DEAD BODIES.JIM PIROLLI OF SUMMIT CARBON SOLUTIONS DENIES THERE ARE ANY THREATS OF EMINENT DOMAIN, IN FACT, SO FAR THEY'VE SIGNED HUNDREDS OF EASEMENTS, COVERING SEVEN HUNDRED MILES.

Jim Pirolli: WE HAVEN'T THREATENED EMINENT DOMAIN ON ANYONE, WE HAVEN'T FILED FOR EMINENT DOMAIN. THAT'S A MUCH DIFFERENT PART OF THE PROCESS, IT'S MUCH LATER IF WE GET THERE. OUR FOCUS IS ON ACQUIRING VOLUNTARY EASEMENTS.

THE CEO OF GLACIAL LAKES ENERGY SAYS SOME OF THE CO-OP'S 42-HUNDRED SHAREHOLDERS ARE ALSO LANDOWNERS AFFECTED BY THE PIPELINE, SO THEY CARE ABOUT WHAT HAPPENS ALONG THE ROUTE.

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Jim Seurer: IT IS SOMETHING THAT'S TOP OF MIND FOR US, IS HOW IT'S IMPACTING FOLKS. AND SO IT'S NOT LIKE WE JUST ARE FOCUSED ON THE MARGIN SIDE OF IT, ALTHOUGH THAT'S THE REASON. WE WANT TO STAY IN BUSINESS, WE WANT TO MAKE MORE MONEY WITH A LOWER CARBON FUEL SO OUR SHAREHOLDERS AND OUR PRODUCERS THAT SERVE US CAN MAKE MORE MONEY.

ONE OF THE MOST WELL ATTENDED EVENTS AT DAKOTAFEST IS THE SOUTH DAKOTA CONGRESSIONAL FORUM. THIS YEAR, THE UPCOMING FARM BILL WAS THE TOPIC.

Rep. Dusty Johnson: I DO THINK WE WANT TO UPDATE REFERENCE PRICING. CLEARLY, INPUTS ARE HIGH. UPDATING REFERENCE PRICING, ASKING WHETHER OR NOT THERE ARE SOME THINGS WE CAN DO TO CROP INSURANCE TO MAKE AD HOC DISASTER RELIEF LESS LIKELY. AND THEN WORKING WITH THE BROADER LIVESTOCK COMMUNITY TO MAKE SURE THAT WE'RE HITTING THE TARGET WITH THEIR RISK MANAGEMENT PRACTICES. WE'VE MOVED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION IN THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I THINK THERE'S STILL A SENSE, FROM AT LEAST SOME OF THE GROUPS, THAT WE'VE GOT A LITTLE WAYS TO GO YET.

Sen. John Thune: THE PAYMENT LIMITS ON CRP ACRES HAVEN'T BEEN INCREASED SINCE 1985, SO IT'S A FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLAR PAYMENT LIMIT TODAY. MOST OTHER FARM BILL PROGRAMS ARE AT 125- THOUSAND DOLLARS, SO I THINK THAT'S ANOTHER WAY OF OPENING UP MORE DEMAND FOR THE PROGRAM.

Sen. Mike Rounds: I DON'T MIND HAVING A CRP PROGRAM THAT GOES FOR TEN YEARS, AS LONG AS THERE'S SOME SAFETY BUILT INTO IT, SO THAT IF YOU DO HAVE A DROUGHT, YOU CAN STILL KEEP YOUR FOUNDATION HERD. YOU'VE ALWAYS GOT TO BE ABLE TO MAINTAIN A COOPERATIVE EFFORT WITH YOUR CONSERVATION GROUPS AS WELL. DON'T MAKE IT SO EASY THAT IT'S BEING USED ALL THE TIME, BECAUSE THEN YOU LOSE THE BENEFIT THAT THEY'RE LOOKING FOR, WHICH IS FOR WILDLIFE PRODUCTION.

ANOTHER POPULAR EVENT WAS THE GOVERNOR'S AG INNOVATION FORUM. GOVERNOR KRIST NOEM EMCEED THE EVENT, WHICH TOUCHED ON THE PROGRESS OF HIGH SPEED BROADBAND IN SOUTH DAKOTA, AS WELL AS NEW INNOVATIVE IDEAS PRODUCERS ARE USING, SUCH AS AUTOMATION IN FARMING AND RANCHING. ONE OF THOSE IS USING A VIRTUAL FENCE FOR GRAZING LIVESTOCK.

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Nick Jorgensen: WE DON'T GIVE CATTLE ENOUGH CREDIT. THEY ARE VERY INTELLIGENT, AND SO IT TAKES A COUPLE DAYS, YOU HAVE TO TRAIN THEM IN A PADDOCK THAT HAS REAL FENCE AROUND IT, JUST SO THEY UNDERSTAND HOW THE SOUND IN THE SHOP WORKS. BUT WE KNOW WHERE THEY ARE ALL THE TIME, WE CAN CONTROL THEIR MOVEMENT. THEREFORE WE CAN CONTROL HOW THE GRASS IS GRAZED, AND THEREFORE HOW IT GROWS, RIGHT? ALL WITH KIND OF THE IDEA OF ULTIMATELY MAKING THAT ACRE MORE EFFICIENT.

JORGENSEN IS CEO OF THE LARGEST SEEDSTOCK OPERATION IN THE U.S. THIS YEAR, THEY'LL MARKET CLOSE TO 52-HUNDRED BULLS.

FOR MORE STORIES FROM DAKOTAFEST, CHECK OUT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR AGWEEK.COM .

EMILY...

THANKS MIKKEL.

MANY FARMERS ARE ALWAYS ON THE HUNT FOR AN ADDITIONAL INCOME AVENUE ON THE FARM. PETERSON FARMS SEED IS OFFERING A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY FOR FARMERS IN THE REGION TO DO JUST THAT.

PETERSON FARMS SEED, LED BY CEO CARL PETERSON, IS LOOKING FOR FARMERS TO GROW AN UNUSUAL CROP FOR THE REGION--PEAS.

This is one of Carl's kind of off the wall projects. This is one of those really grower focused projects that we're looking at, we're looking at adding profitability.

THE PEAS ARE ULTRA HIGH-PROTEIN. AFTER BEING GROWN AND HARVESTED, THE PEAS WOULD GO TO PROCESSING PLANTS WHERE THEIR PROTEIN CONTENT WOULD GO DIRECTLY INTO FOOD OR ANOTHER PRODUCT. POSSIBLE PROCESSING PLANTS FOR THE PROJECT ARE LOCATED IN MINOT AND RIGHT ACROSS THE CANADIAN BORDER.

The Red River Valley isn't really somewhere that we conventionally see peas, but I am from western North Dakota, so a lot of my area is going to be very interested in that. Where we're looking at sandier ground, stuff that's a little bit drier.

PETERSON FARMS SEED WILL BE SIGNING CONTRACTS WITH PRODUCERS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN THEIR ULTRA HIGH PROTEIN PEAS THIS FALL AND WINTER.

AS COVER CROPS GROW IN USE, MORE FARMERS ARE STARTING TO GROW THEIR OWN. UNIVERSITIES ARE ALSO REVIVING SEED DEVELOPMENT IN COVER CROPS LIKE RYE. JEFF BEACH HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Jeff Beach: WE'RE IN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE A FARMER SHARES WHAT HE'S LEARNING ABOUT COVER CROPS.

Randy Melvin: IT'S OUR THIRD GROWING SEASON OF HAVING RYE. THAT WAS THE FIRST TIME SINCE 1962.

RANDY MELVIN FARMS WITH HIS DAD AND BROTHER NEAR BUFFALO, NORTH DAKOTA. IN 2019, PREVENTED PLANT SENT THEM LOOKING FOR A COVER CROP. THEY DECIDED ON RYE.

Randy Melvin: THERE ARE SOME REWARDING ASPECTS OF RAISING RYE, ESPECIALLY AS A COVER CROP, THAT WE FIND REALLY INTRIGUING, AND WANT TO CONTINUE WORKING WITH AND HAVING IT AS A FIT INTO OUR ROTATION.

RYE IS A WINTER-HARDY GRAIN THAT DEVELOPS A DEEP ROOT SYSTEM. IT'S GOOD FOR SOIL HEALTH, A STRONG COMPETITOR TO WEEDS, AND HELPS REDUCE WATER AND WIND EROSION. IT CAN BE A COMPANION CROP TO SOYBEANS, EDIBLE BEANS AND SUGARBEETS, AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS CAN USE IT FOR GRAZING OR FORAGE. MELVIN SAYS THE RYE CUT HIS WEEDS IN HALF.

Randy Melvin: LOOKING AT THE BENEFITS WE'RE SEEING THERE, IT EASILY JUSTIFIES HAVING THAT COVER CROP OUT THERE, THE EXPENSE OF IT, BUT ALSO YOU HAVE THE SAVINGS IN TILLAGE COSTS, TOO.

Jeff Beach: AFTER HARVESTING THIS YEAR'S RYE CROP, HE'LL BE READY TO SEED LATER THIS MONTH.

Randy Melvin: EACH YEAR PROVIDES A NEW CHALLENGE, AND A NEW OPPORTUNITY.

NEAR BUFFALO, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS JEFF BEACH FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE CHECK CROP PROGRESS, AS WE KICK OFF OUR ANNUAL CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: CRARY AND FULL POD 2022, FARMERS MUTUAL OF NEBRASKA, NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL, NORTH DAKOTA CORN COUNCIL, MINNESOTA SOYBEAN, AND GERINGHOFF

THIS WEEK WE BEGIN TAKING A LOOK AT HOW THE CORN AND SOYBEAN CROP IS LOOKING AROUND THE REGION.

FOR OUR FIRST AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR STOP OF 2022, I TRAVELED TO WYNDMERE, NORTH DAKOTA TO CHECK OUT THE CORN.

Carson: Right around the Wyndmere area, things look pretty good considering what we've been through this year.

CARSON KLOSTERMAN FARMS SOYBEANS, SUGARBEETS AND CORN IN WYNDMERE NORTH DAKOTA. DESPITE THE LATE START TO PLANTING THE CORN CROP, HE IS HAPPY WITH THE WAY HIS CORN ACRES ARE LOOKING.

Carson: We've seen it all this year from late start with cool weather, wet snow to a big rain in may which affected the earlier planting stuff from some ponding and some replant took place.

KLOSTERMAN HAD MULTIPLE FIELDS THAT SUFFERED FROM PONDING AND HAD TO REPLANT SOME OF HIS CROP. BUT HE SAYS THE CROP HAS BOUNCED BACK DUE TO THE AMOUNT OF GROWING DEGREE THIS SUMMER AND IS ON TRACK FOR A TYPICAL HARVEST DATE.

Carson: Now here we are, the middle of August and the grain is filling and we could use some nice rains to help just fill all the crops.

KLOSTERMAN SAID THAT WEEDS WERE PERSISTENT IN HIS CORN CROP THIS YEAR, ALONG WITH PESTS THAT MAY BE A PROBLEM FOR HIM NEXT YEAR TOO.

Carson: Root worm beetles and such. Next year might be a little interesting with the over wintering insects for corn.

DESPITE THAT, KLOSTERMAN IS HOPEFUL THAT A GOOD HARVEST WITH A DECENT YIELD IS ACHIEVABLE

Carson: I guess I'll shoot low in hopes that we exceed that. Looking at some cobs in the field I mean it'll be, one guy likes to joke everything's been under 300 so far. But it'll be an okay crop, you know, 150-175.

Mikkel Pates here on the Agweek Corn and soybean tour. Today, I'm with Brett McGillvaryy near Doland, South Dakota. We're focusing on soybeans here. What did it look like for the soybean producer here?

Bret McGillivary: The biggest challenge for pretty much the whole northeast region was too wet late planning.

Mikkel Pates: Yeah. So you guys maybe in this field here that we're looking at south of Doland would be, would have been planted when?

Bret McGillivary: Normally we would be the first week or ten days of May. But a lot of these fields would have not went into late May or early June.

And so what is how has that affected their production and especially as the moisture has come this year. What's happened with your soybeans here?

Bret McGillivary: Well, so far, it hasn't affected it because we have a longer growing season here because we're in the James Valley. But it will probably definitely affect the number of pods, amount of flowers.

And so what do you expect in terms of yield as ten being the best? What do you expect for yields and here do you think you're at?

Bret McGillivary: We're at right now could be a seven, but we're at the brink of really needing moisture. So it could go down from there or up.

Mikkel Pates: But you think you're maybe getting a little behind for this time?

Bret McGillivary: We're definitely getting behind for this time of year. Right now, our biggest concern with what's left is insects. And there's not been a big issue, but that's what we're concerned about from this point on.

Mikkel Pates: So What insects are you usually dealing the most with here?

Bret McGillivary: In this area? Be mostly being leaf beetles and grasshoppers There's times that this is a spider mite area, but we've been wet enough and humid enough that that's not a condition this year.

Thanks, Bret, for talking to us. For Agweek's Corn and Soybean Tour this is Michael Pates.

OUR CROP TOURS CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT SEVERAL WEEKS.

FARMERS ARE WATCHING CLOSELY TO SEE HOW THE SUPREME COURT WILL RULE ON FEDERAL WATER REGULATION.

IN OCTOBER THE HIGH COURT WILL HEAR "SACKETT VERSUS THE EPA". IT DEALS WITH A FAMILY'S ABILITY TO BUILD ON THEIR LAND, BECAUSE THE WETLANDS ON THE PROPERTY FALL UNDER THE WATERS OF THE U.S. RULE. IN THE MEANTIME, THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION IS TRYING TO FORM A NEW WATER PROTECTION POLICY.

AMERICAN FARM BUREAU VICE PRESIDENT SCOTT VANDERWAL, WHO FARMS IN SOUTH DAKOTA, SAYS HE'S VERY CONCERNED THAT THE ADMINISTRATION IS GOING BACK TO THE 2015 VERSION.

Scott VanderWal: WE LIKE THE RULE THAT WAS PUT IN PLACE A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO THAT WAS REALLY COMMON SENSE AND IT WAS EASY TO UNDERSTAND, AND FAIR TO EVERYBODY.

THE SUPREME COURT IS EXPECTED TO RULE ON THE SACKETT CASE IN THE FIRST HALF OF 2023. BUT THE EPA HAS INDICATED IT PLANS TO ISSUE A WOTUS RULE BY THE END OF THIS YEAR.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, IT'S TIME TO CHECK YOUR SOYBEAN FIELDS FOR DISEASE...

AS THE GROWING SEASON PROGRESSES, COLD THE REGION USE SOME RAIN? HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

AFTER A LATE START THIS SPRING, THE SOYBEAN CROP IS LOOKING GOOD. BUT THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR TO GET OUT AND CHECK YOUR FIELDS FOR SIGNS OF DISEASE. ROSE DUNN HAS MORE IN THIS MONTH'S SOY INSIGHT.

Rose Dunn: Despite kind of a late start planting in the spring, the soybean crop is catching up and looking pretty good. But there are some things growers need to be watching out for. Joining us now is Dr. Sam Markell, extension plant pathologist. This is a critical time of year for growers, isn't it?

Sam Markell: Yeah, the crop does look great. And one of the things I encourage growers to do sometime between mid-August and early to mid September, they want to go out into that crop and take a look for some of the diseases that they might find. And really what we're looking for is four different diseases to show up. Soybean cyst nematode has been around for a while now. A lot of the growers know about soybean cyst and we talk about soil sampling. And the North Dakota Soybean Council makes it really easy. There's bags that are distributed to each of the county offices in the state. Growers can pick it up, take a soil sample, send it in to the lab, and then they'll get their data back in the mail.

And the Soybean Council cover covers the lab fees.

But there's three other ones that I think that they should look at, too. So sudden death syndrome is an emerging disease in the state. Usually you see it as really bright yellow flecks on the leaves. And eventually what happens is those plants will drop those leaves and the plants will die fairly quickly.

Brown stem rot shows up in mid-August as well, and you can find that by cutting the stem open in the middle and they'll be like a brown line and a charcoal rot shows up in a hot, dry August. And we've had a couple of those in a row and we saw some pretty significant charcoal rot in the last two years.

And what happens with that is you see areas in the field that will start to move prematurely, they start to die and the leaves will all hang on and pretty soon you'll have an area of soybeans that looks like it needs to be harvested about three weeks before anything else. So what you find in August, there will be solutions, there will be management tools that you can have available in the next upcoming years.

Very important information. Thanks for joining us, Dr. Sam Markell.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCN SAMPLING PROGRAM, CONTACT SAM MARKELL AT NDSU.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, A NORTH DAKOTA EXTENSION AGENT GETS A TOP HONOR.

AN NDSU EXTENSION SPECIALIST HAS EARNED A BIG HONOR.

KARL HOPPE HAS BEEN A LIVESTOCK SPECIALIST AT THE CARRINGTON RESEARCH CENTER FOR 32 YEARS. HE WAS RECENTLY INDUCTED INTO THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COUNTY AGENTS HALL OF FAME. ONLY FOUR AGENTS A YEAR GET THIS HONOR, AND HOPPE IS ONLY THE SECOND IN NORTH DAKOTA.

Karl Hoppe: It is unique, it's just hard to get the award period, because they divide it into fourteen regions, and only one person out of thirteen states is selected. And I feel like I'm in pretty elite company.

HOPPE ALSO RAISES CATTLE AND SHEEP

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A FARMER WHO'S AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR'S OLDEST SHAREHOLDER CELEBRATES HIS 105TH BIRTHDAY.

AND MINNESOTA LOOKS AT WAYS TO IMPROVE THE LOCAL MEATPACKING INDUSTRY.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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