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AgweekTV Full Show: Cereal Crop Tour, Yellowstone River Beef, David Thompson, Follow a Farmer

This week on AgweekTV, despite a slow start, crops around the region are catching up. We'll take a look, on our Cereals Crop Tour. A North Dakota beef processor is expanding, with a big boost from the state. A Minnesota farmer is taking the reins of an international sugar association. And we'll check back in with the young northern North Dakota potato grower we're following for the season.

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This week on AgweekTV, despite a slow start, crops around the region are catching up. We'll take a look, on our Cereals Crop Tour. A North Dakota beef processor is expanding, with a big boost from the state. A Minnesota farmer is taking the reins of an international sugar association. And we'll check back in with the young northern North Dakota potato grower we're following for the season.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

A NORTH DAKOTA ETHANOL PLANT IS THE FIRST IN THE NATION TO CAPTURE AND STORE C-O 2 EMISSIONS UNDERGROUND.

(VO)

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{CG: Red Trail Energy Makes History // Nation's 1st to Store CO2 Underground }

THE RED TRAIL ENERGY PLANT IN RICHARDTON WILL CAPTURE ABOUT 500 METRIC TONS OF CARBON DIOXIDE EVERY DAY. IT'S PRODUCED BY FERMENTING CORN TO MAKE FUEL. THE COMPANY STARTED CAPTURING CARBON IN MID-JUNE. RED TRAIL IS APPROVED TO CAPTURE 180 THOUSAND METRIC TONS OF THE GREENHOUSE GAS. IT'S STORED MORE THAN A MILE UNDERGROUND. THE COMPANY'S ABILITY TO CAPTURE AND STORE 100% OF TS CARBON EMISSIONS MAKES IT ELIGIBLE FOR LUCRATIVE CARBON CREDITS.

YELLOWSTONE RIVER BEEF IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA IS EXPANDING ITS PLANT TO KEEP UP WITH INCREASING DEMAND, WITH HELP FROM A BIG STATE GRANT.

(VO)

{CG: ND Beef Exporter Expanding // Yellowstone River Beef - Williston, ND}

THE COMPANY PROCESSES BEEF FROM CATTLE BOUGHT AT RANCHES IN THE DAKOTAS AND MONTANA. IT SHIPS ABOUT SEVENTY PERCENT OF ITS PRODUCTION TO ASIAN AND MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES. CEO TREVOR ABELL AND TWO PARTNERS BOUGHT THE PLANT FROM A LOCAL BEEF PROCESSOR IN 2019. THE NORTH DAKOTA AG DEPARTMENT AWARDED YELLOWSTONE RIVER BEEF $250,000 TO EXPAND PROCESSING CAPACITY AND UPGRADE THE BUILDING. ABELL SAYS IT SHOULD HELP THEM INCREASE EXPORTS.

(SOT)

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{CG: Trevor Abell // Yellowstone River Beef CEO }

(CONT. VO)THE EXPANSION IS EXPECTED TO BE DONE THIS FALL, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10,000 FEET OF PROCESSING SPACE. THEY HOPE TO EXPAND FROM 20 FULL TIME EMPLOYEES TO AT LEAST 50.

WITH THE WARM WEATHER THROUGHOUT THE UPPER PLAINS, HOW'S THAT AFFECTING SMALL GRAINS IN OUR REGION?

IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, WE CONTINUE OUR AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR,

(MAP - Casselton, ND)

WHERE I MADE A STOP IN CASSELTON, IN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

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(AS LIVE)

[1:50]

{CG: Clair Keene // NDSU Ext. Agronomist / Cereal Crops Specialist}

{CG: Clair Keene // NDSU Ext. Agronomist / Cereal Crops Specialist}

< EMILY: I'M WITH CLAIR KEENE, NDSU EXTENSION AGRONOMIST, AND DO YOU WANT TO GO AHEAD AND TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE FIELD WE'RE CURRENTLY STANDING IN?

Clair Keene: SURE. WE'RE IN A FIELD OF ND HERON SPRING WHEAT, THE NEWEST ND SPRING WHEAT VARIET TO BE RELEASED.

SO WE'VE BEEN HAVING SOME EXCESSIVE HEAT HERE IN THE REGION. HOW HAS THAT HELPED THE GROWING PROCESS ALONG?

Clair Keene: A LOT OF FARMERS I'VE SPOKEN WITH ARE REALLY SURPRISED THAT DESPITE THE LATE PLANTING, THE CROP MATURITY HAS REALLY JUST SPED RIGHT ALONG. AND I CHALK THAT UP TO SOME VERY HOT TEMPERATURES LATE MAY, EARLY JUNE, AND THE CROP JUST REALLY GETTING PUSHED. AND WE SEE THAT HERE. THIS CROP LOOKS PRETTY GOOD, BUT THINGS ARE PERHAPS JUST A LITTLE BIT ACCELERATED, SO THE PLANT DIDN'T HAVE AS MUCH TIME TO DO PHOTOSYNTHESIS, AND PUT ON AS MUCH VEGETATIVE GROWTH AS WE'D LIKE TO SEE WITH THOSE HOT TEMPS, SO I'M THINKING THAT YIELDS WILL BE AVERAGE. SOME FOLKS MIGHT GET A LITTLE BIT ABOVE, OR A LITTLE BELOW. BUT OVERALL, PRETTY GOOD.

SO AS YOU'VE BEEN GOING OUT AND TALKING TO PRODUCERS, ARE THERE ANY DISEASES THAT THEY ARE PARTICULARLY WORRIED ABOUT?

Clair Keene: WE'VE SEEN A LOT OF BACTERIAL LEAF STREAK. WE DON'T HAVE ANY GOOD CHEMICAL CONTROL OPTIONS FOR THAT, BUT IT IS ONE THAT IN PLACES WHERE WE'VE HAD THOSE HIGH WINDS SHREDDING LEAVES AND THEN PERSISTANT WET WEATHER, SEEING SOME BACTERIAL LEAF STREAK.

SO WE HOPPED ON OVER TO A WINTER WHEAT FIELD, WHICH IS SIGNIFICANTLY LESS POPULAR IN THE REGION. DO YOU WANT TO GO AHEAD AND TELL ME ABOUT THAT?

Clair Keene: SURE. SO, IN NORTH DAKOTA WE'RE DEFINITELY A SPRING WHEAT STATE. WE TYPICALLY HAVE SOMEWHERE IN THE FIVE TO SIX MILLION ACRES A YEAR OF SPRING WHEAT. BUT WINTER WHEAT, WE'RE USUALLY LESS THAN A MILLION ACRES, SOMETIMES SUBSTANTIALLY LESS THAN THAT.

HAS THERE BEEN ANY GROWING INTEREST IN WINTER WHEAT WITH PRODUCERS?

Clair Keene: THE AGRONOMY SEED FARM HAS BEEN GETTING CALLS FOR WINTER WHEAT NOW, WHICH IS UNUSUAL. USUALLY IT'S IN A FEW WEEKS, IF NOT A MONTH FROM NOW THAT PEOPLE ARE THINKING ABOUT IT. SO YES, I DO THINK THERE IS INTEREST OUT THERE, PRIMARILY IN THE EASTERN PART OF THE STATE, FROM THOSE PREVENT PLANT ACRES.

THANKS CLAIR, CLAIRE KEENE, NDSU EXTENSIO AGRONOMIST.>

OUR CEREALS CROP TOUR ALSO STOPPED IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA, NEAR CROOKSTON, WHERE THE SPRING WHEAT CROP IS LOOKING FAIRLY SOLID.

(PKG)

[1:29]

{CG: Noel Anderson // AgriMax Agronomist }

AGRONOMIST NOEL ANDERSON SAYS THAT MOST OF THE AREA HE COVERS IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA AND NORTHWEST MINNESOTA IS LOOKING AT AVERAGE TO ABOVE AVERAGE YIELDS, DESPITE THE COLD, WET SPRING THAT PUSHED BACK PLANTING ABOUT THREE WEEKS.Noel Anderson: IT WAS A LITTLE SURPRISING, I DON'T THINK ANYBODY REALLY KNEW WHAT TO EXPECT WITH THE LATE PLANTING CONDITIONS. A LOT OF THIS WHEAT WASN'T PLANTED UNTIL THE END OF MAY, WHCH ISN'T UNHEARD OF, IT'S JUST, WE JUST WEREN'T SURE WHAT TO EXPECT GOING INTO THIS YEAR, SO I THINK IT'S A PLEASANT SURPRISE FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE.ANDERSON IS EXPECTING THIS FIELD TO BE HARVESTED IN LATE AUGUST, ABOUT THREE WEEKS LATER THAN NORMAL.Noel Anderson: BUT WHAT IS NORMAL? WE DON'T TYPICALLY HAVE NORMAL CONDITIONS, SO, AUGUST 25TH IS A LITTLE BIT LATER, BUT IT'S NOT ABSOLUTELY UNHEARD OF.ANDERSON SAYS THEY'VE HAD PRETTY GOOD RAINS THROUGH THE SEASON, AND HE SAYS THE HOT WEATHER WILL HELP THE CROP CATCH UP. BUT THE HOT, HUMID WEATHER IS ALSO RIGHT FOR FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT, SO HE RECOMMENDS SPRAYING FUNGICIDE, AND HE SAYS THEY'RE SEEING A FEW GRASSHOPPERS. HE'S ESTIMATING YIELDS OF SIXTY TO EIGHTY BUSHELS AN ACRE. SOME GROWERS DID HAVE CHALLENGES, INCLUDING HEAVY RAINS, HAIL AND STRONG WINDSTORMS, BUT ANDERSON SAYS MOST FARED OK, AND HE SAYS IT'S CERTAINLY BETTER THAN LAST YEAR'S DROUGHT.Noel Anderson: SOME THINGS ARE A MAYBE A LITTLE BIT FARTHER BEHIND THAN WHAT WE'RE USED TO AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, BUT OVERALL WE'RE LOOKING PRETTY GOOD.>(BACK ON CAM)LAST YEAR, THE DROUGHT CUT YIELDS IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA SPRING WHEAT TO 30 TO 50 BUSHELS AN ACRE.

THE AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR IS SPONSORED BY HEFTY SEED COMPANY OF WILTON AND HURDSFIELD, NORTH DAKOTA... CORTEVA AGRISCIENCE, AND MOSAIC

< Katie Pinke: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TAKE YOU TO NORTHEASTERN NORTH DAKOTA, TO SEE THE MIDSUMMER BLOOM OF POTATOES.>

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

AFTER A LATE START WITH PLANTING, THE SOYBEAN CROP IS CATCHING UP. BUT NOW IT'S TIME FOR GROWERS TO START WATCHING FOR PESTS. ROSE DUNN TALKED WITH AN ENTOMOLOGIST WHO SAYS GRASSHOPPERS ARE STARTING TO SHOW UP.

(AS LIVE)

[2:02]

{CG: Sponsored Content // Rose Dunn // Fargo, ND}

{CG: Sponsored Content // Janet Knodel // NDSU Ext. Entomologist}

< ROSE: JOINING ME IS NDSU PROFESSOR AND EXTENSION ENTOMOLOGIST JANET KNODEL. JANET, WITH OUR COOL, WET, LATE PLANTING START THIS LAST SPRING, THIGS ARE STARTING TO CATCH UP NOW, WHICH IS GOOD NEWS, BUT THE BAD NEWS MAYBE IS THAT WE'RE STARTING TO SEE A FEW PESTS IN THE FIELD.

Janet Knodel: YES, WE'VE HAD A LOT OF GRASSHOPPERS, AND IT'S PRIMARILY DUE TO THE WEATHER THAT WE'VE HAD THE LAST FEW YEARS. WE WERE IN A SEVERE DROUGHT, AND GRASSHOPPER POPULATIONS ARE CLOSELY TIED TO THE WEATHER. THERE'S ADEQUATE MOISTURE FOR THE CROP TO GROW, SO THERE'S PLENTY OF FOOD FOR THEM, SO WE'RE SEEING A LOT OF GRASSHOPPERS IN SOYBEANS AND OTHER FIELD CROPS THIS YEAR.

WHAT DO GROWERS NEED TO BE DOING RIGHT NOW?

Janet Knodel: THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO GET OUT AND SCOUT YOUR FIELDS, TO SEE IF THEY'RE AT THE ECONMIC THRESHOLD LEVELS. YOU CAN DO THAT BY VISUALLY ESTIMATING THE NUMBER OF GRASSHOPPERS PER SQUARE YARD, OR YOU CAN USE A SWEEP NET, WHICH FOUR SWEEPS, PENDULUM SWEEPS, IS EQUIVALENT TO A SQUARE YARD.

SO IF YOU FIND A SIGNIFICANT GRASHOPPER POULATION, WHAT'S THE NEXT STEP?

Janet Knodel: WELL THEN YOU'LL NEED TO GET AN INSECTICIDE OUT INTO THE FIELD. THERE ARE SEVERAL IN SOYBEAN THAT YOU CAN SELECT FROM. A NEW MODE OF ACTION CALLED A DIAMINE, VANTACOR, WHICH IS THE ONE THAT I'M HIGHLY RECOMMENDING THIS YEAR, BECAUSE WE NEED TO PRESERVE OUR PYRETHROIDE INSECTICIDES FOR OTHER INSECTS THAT MIGHT BE OCURRING LATER IN THE SEASON IN SOYBEAN.

TELL ME A LITTLE BIT MORE ABOUT HOW VANTACOR WORKS?

Janet Knodel: WE'RE QUITE EXCITED TO HAVE A NEW CHEMISTRY AVAILABLE FOR CONTROL OF GRASSHOPPERS AND LEPIDOPTERA, INSECT PESTS LIKE GREEN CLOVER WORM. IT'S VERY EFFECTIVE. IT HAS A LITTLE BIT LONGER RESIDUAL, TWO TO THREE WEEKS, COMPARED TO A PYRETHROIDE, AND IT ALSO IS A LITTLE BIT MORE FRIENDLY TO THE BENEFICIAL INSECTS THAT ARE OUT IN THE FIELD.

ALL RIGHT, THANKS FOR ALL THAT IMPORTANT INFORMATION, JANE KNODEL NDSU EXTENSION ENTOMOLOGIST. >

(BACK ON CAM)

{CG: Sponsored Content // bit.ly/SoyNDSUExtEntomology // For More Information}

FOR MORE INFORMATION, YOU CAN GO TO THE WEBSITE ON YOUR SCREEN.

AN EAST GRAND FORKS, MINNESOTA FARMER IS THE NEW LEADER OF AN INTERNATIONAL SUGAR GROUP.

(VO)

{CG: EGF Farmer Leads Int'l Group // World Assn of Beet & Cane Growers }

DAVID THOMPSON IS THE NEWLY ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE WORLD ASSOCIATION OF BEET AND CANE GROWERS. THOMPSON IS A THIRD GENERATION BEET GROWER, AND HIS FATHER, ORDEAN, WAS ONE OF THE FARMERS WHO STARTED AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR IN 1973.

THOMPSON SAYS THE ASSOCIATION MEETS TO EXCHANGE IDEAS ON EDUCATING PEOPLE ABOUT SUGAR PRODUCTION, ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES, AND EXPANDING ITS USE.

(SOT)

[16]

{CG: David Thompson // President - World Assn of Beet & Cane Growers }

(CONT. VO) THE ORGANIZATION IS MADE UP OF 36 CANE AND SUGARBEET GROWERS ASSOCIATIONS FROM 34 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES.REPS FROM THOSE COUNTRIES WILL BE COMING TO FARGO IN 2024 FOR THE WORLD CONVENTION.

AGAIN THIS YEAR, WE'RE FOLLOWING SEVERAL FARMERS THROUGH THE GROWING SEASON.

AFTER A SLOW START THIS SPRING, THINGS ARE LOOKING GOOD ON THE SHEPHARD FARM,

(MAP - Crystal, ND)

IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE KATIE PINKE FOUND THE POTATO FIELDS IN FULL BLOOM.

(PKG)

[1:34]

{CG: :00 Katie Pinke // Crystal, ND }

{CG: :29 Thomas Shephard // Crystal, ND Farmer }

{CG: Lyle Shephard // Crystal, ND Farmer }

Thomas Shephard: THIS IS PROBABLY MY FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR AS A FARMER, IT'S JUST BEAUTIFUL AROUND. WITH THE POTATOES, SOME PEOPE HAVE COME OUT IN THE SUMMERTIME AND THEY, YOU KNOW, THINK MAYBE WE GROW FLOWERS BECAUSE THEY JUST LOOK SO BEAUTIFUL.There's ten under that one.Thomas Shephard: EVERYTHING'S LOOKING GOOD. THE POTATOES, WHEAT, CORN, SOYBEANS EDIBLE BEANS AROUND HERE. WE'RE PROBABLY ONLY A FEW WEEKS AWAY FROM WHEAT HARVEST. SHARE A LITTLE BIT ABOUT DISEASE PRESSURE YOU'RE SEEING IN YOUR POTATOES THIS TIME OF YEAR, AND HOW YOU'RE ADDRESSING IT.SO HERE ON OUR FARM WE TAKE DISEASE PRESSURE ON POTATOES REALLY SERIOUSLY. IT'S SOMETHING THAT IF YOU DON'T KEEP YOUR EYE ON IT, IT COULD REALLY BE A DETRIMENT OR WIPE OUT YOUR CROP. SO WHAT WE DO IS WE'RE CONSTANTLY WATCHING OUR POTATOES FOR LATE BLIGHT AND SPRAYING THEM UP TO WEEKLY COME THIS TIME OF YEAR, JUST SO WE CAN KEEP THEM IN THE BEST SHAPE WE CAN UNTIL HARVEST ROLLS AROUND.I would think there'd be a great set under here because they've been pretty moist.Katie Pinke: SHEPHARD FARMS ALONGSIDE HIS DAD LYLE.Lyle Shephard: I HAVEN'T TAUGHT THOMAS A LOT OF THINGS. /HE'S REALLY SURPRISING ME, HE UNDERSTANDS A LOT OF STUFF BETTER THAN I DO, AND IT'S GREAT TO HAVE HIM BACK.This is a variety called Dakota Pearls that really set heavy.Thomas Shephard: WHEN POTATOES ARE FLOWERING, OUR GOAL IS ROW CLOSURE. WE DON'T WANT TO BE ABLE TO SEE ANY DIRT IN BETWEEN THE POTATOES. WE JUST WANT TO SEE A FIELD OF FLOWERS. THAT'S A GOOD CHANCE THAT THERE'S GOING TO BE QUITE A GOOD YIELD, AND YOU'VE GOT A GOOD CROP IN THAT FIELD.Katie Pinke: FOR AGWEEK TV, NEAR CRYSTAL, NORTH DAKOTA THIS IS KATIE PINKE>(BACK ON CAM)KATIE WILL CHECK BACK IN AT THE SHEPHARD FARM IN MID-SEPTEMBER FOR POTATO HARVEST.

COMING UP, WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW A FARM FAMILY GOT THIS GAZEBO ON TOP OF A SILO, AS WE PULL ANOTHER OF OUR FAVORITES FROM THE AGWEEK VAULT.

GROWING CONDITIONS IN OUR REGION HAVE STAYED FAVORABLE. BUT WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF THE U.S?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

A FEW MILES NORTH OF MORRIS, MINNESOTA, ON HIGHWAY 59, THERE'S AN UNUSUAL SIGHT. A GAZEBO SITS HIGH ON TOP OF AN OLD SILO. IN THIS WEEK'S STORY FROM THE AGWEEK VAULT, ROSE DUNN SHOWS YOU HOW IT GOT UP THERE.

(PKG)

[1:44]

{CG: :00 Rose Dunn // Morris, MN }

{CG: :19 Ardis Lesmeister // Morris, MN }

{CG: :26 AgweekTV Vault - Silo Gazebo // Originally Aired Oct. 2019}

{CG: :51 Lane Lesmeister // Morris, MN }

Ardis Lesmeister: WELL IT WAS ON A 100 DOLLAR BET THAT HE COULDN'T DO IT. OF COURSE THERE WAS NO BLUEPRINTS OR ANYTHING WRITTEN DOWN ON PAPER. HE JUST KNEW HOW TO DO THAT KIND OF THING. ROSE: ARDIS LESMEISTER'S HUSBAND JACK, AND THEIR SONS, STARTED BUILDING THIS GAZEBO IN THE LATE 80'S, AFTER THE BARN NEXT TO IT BURNED DOWN. MUCH OF THE GAZEBO WAS BUILT ON THE GROUND. IN 1993, IT WAS PERCHED ON TOP THE SILO WITH A 75 TON CRANE. WINDOWS, WOOD TRIM AND RAILINGS WERE ADDED ONCE IT WAS IN PLACE. OH, IT'S NICE AND SUNNY UP HERE! THERE WE ARE.ROSE: JACK'S SON, LANE, WAS A YOUNG TEEN AT THE TIME.Lane: I WOULD HAVE TO SAY PROBABLY THE MOST DAUNTING THING WAS HANGING UPSIDE DOWN TO WELD A LOT OF THE SEAMS. THERE WAS JUST NO WAY TO GET AT THE ANGLE. ROSE: IN ADDITION TO FARMING, THE LESMEISTERS ARE IN THE STEEL BUSINESS, SO THEY WERE ABLE TO KEEP COSTS DOWN. STILL, THEY ESTIMATE IT WAS ABOUT 40-THOUSAND DOLLARS TO BUILD AND INSTALL. LANE ESTIMATES THERE ARE 15-20 TONS OF STEEL IN THE STRUCTURE, MUCH OF IT RECYCLED I-BEAMS FROM BRIDGES AROUND THE AREA. HOLDING IT UP INSIDE THE SILO ARE FOUR FIFTY-FOOT BEAMS SUNK INTO EIGHT FEET OF CONCRETE.JACK PASSED AWAY ABOUT THREE YEARS AGO, BUT HE REMAINS AN IMPORTANT PRESENCE IN THE GAZEBO.LANE: YEAH, WHENEVER I HAVE A TOUGH DAY OR SOMETHING I COME UP AND PLUNK DOWN IN DAD'S CHAIR AND ASK HIM.ROSE: THE FAMILY FINDS THE GAZEBO A PEACEFUL PLACE TO RELAX....AND ENJOY THE EIGHT MILE VIEW. NEAR MORRIS, MINNESOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK. music up then fades>(BACK ON CAM)LANE SAYS IT'S A THREE SEASON GAZEBO, SO THEY SHUT IT DOWN FOR THE WINTER.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL VISIT A DAIRY FARM THAT'S THE CREAM OF THE CROP.

A SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA DAIRY FARM NOW HAS THE HONOR OF BEING THE STATE'S TOP DAIRY PRODUCER.

(VO)

{CG: MN Dairy Producer of the Year // Johnson's Rolling Acres - Peterson, MN }

THE MINNESOTA MILK PRODUCERS ASSSOCIATION CHOSE JOHNSON'S ROLLING ACRES FARM IN FILMORE COUNTY AS PRODUCER OF THE YEAR. A CELEBRATION OF THE HONOR WAS HELD RECENTLY ON THEIR FARM. IT'S A MULTIGENERATIONAL FAMILY FARM OPERATED BY SIX PARTNERS. MINNESOTA MILK SAYS THE AWARD RECOGNIZES AN OPERATION'S LEADERSHIP IN THE DAIRY INDUSTRY, AND COMMITMENT TO FUTURE GENERATIONS. THE DIVERSIFIED FARM WAS STARTED IN 1979. THEY MILK 12-HUNDRED COWS, FINISH 10,000 PIGS A YEAR, AND HAVE 35-HUNDRED ACRES OF CROP LAND.

(SOT)

[17]

{CG: Trinity Johnson // Johnson's Rolling Acres - Peterson, MN }

{CG: Lucas Sjostrom // MN Milk Producers Exec. Dir. }

Lucas Sjostrom: THIS IS FOR US TO SHOWCASE WHAT DAIRY IS AND CAN BE. A TIME TO SLOW DOWN AND JUST SAY HEY, THANK YOU FOR WHAT YOU'VE DONE FOR OUR COMMUNITY. YOU KNOW, YOU'RE A GREAT ROLE MODEL AND WE'D LIKE OTHERS TO BE LIKE YOU.>(CONT. VO)AWARD WINNERS RECEIVE A SCHOLARSHIP TOWARD EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING, AS WELL AS A FRAMED ART PRINT.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A PLANNED SOYBEAN CRUSHING PLANT IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA, HAS GOTTEN A FAVORABLE RULING ON ITS POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT.

AND DEMONSTRATIONS, POLITICAL FORUMS AND A NEW "NETWORKING LOUNGE" ARE ON TAP FOR THE ANNUAL FARMFEST AG SHOW IN MINNESOTA.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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