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AgweekTV Full Show: Calf value increase, Agweek Crop Tour, Famo Feeds, farm bill formation

This week on AgweekTV, USDA increases help for ranchers who lost cattle in spring blizzards. We'll check out the wheat condition in central North Dakota on the Agweek Cereals Crop Tour. We'll meet one of animal agriculture's most visible ambassadors. And policymakers hit the road to hear what farmers want in the next farm bill.

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This week on AgweekTV, USDA increases help for ranchers who lost cattle in spring blizzards. We'll check out the wheat condition in central North Dakota on the Agweek Cereals Crop Tour. We'll meet one of animal agriculture's most visible ambassadors. And policymakers hit the road to hear what farmers want in the next farm bill.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

RANCHERS WHO LOST CALVES IN THE TWO APRIL BLIZZARDS GET SOME GOOD NEWS.

THE USDA INCREASED THE PAYMENT RATE FOR CALVES LOST, THROUGH THE THE LIVESTOCK INDEMNITY PROGRAM.

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THE PAYMENTS, WHICH ARE DISTRIBUTED THROUGH FSA, ARE BASED ON 75-PERCENT OF "AVERAGE FAIR MARKET VALUE" FOR LIVESTOCK.

THE CHANGE MEANS THE VALUE FOR CALVES IN THE BOTTOM TIER, THOSE LESS THAN 250 POUNDS, INCREASED BY NEARLY 300 DOLLARS A HEAD.

Marcy Svenningsen: It went from 175 to 475 roughly, so it was very significant. This will have the vast majority of calves that were lost are going to be in that tier. When you're looking at the level of losses that we believe are out there, with over 2,000 notices of loss right now, we think that this is going to have a tremendous impact.

RANCHERS HAVE UNTIL MARCH 1ST, 2023 TO FILE A REPORT OF LOSSES.

UKRAINE WILL EXPORT GRAIN THROUGH ODESA PORTS, DESPITE THE RECENT RUSSIAN MISSILE ATTACK INTENDED TO STOP EXPORTS.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENT ZELENSKYY SAYS THE MISSILE ATTACK THREATENED TO END A DEAL TO ALLOW TRADE TO RESUME.

THE DEAL, SIGNED JUST 24 HOURS BEFORE THE MISSILE ATTACK, WAS HAILED AS A DIPLOMATIC BREAKTHROUGH THAT COULD RESTORE UKRAINIAN GRAIN SHIPMENTS TO PRE-WAR LEVELS AND BRING UKRAINE AT LEAST A BILLION DOLLARS A MONTH.

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ZELENSKYY SAYS HE HOPES TO SHOW THE WORLD THEY WON'T ALLOW RUSSIA TO STOP UKRAINIAN CROPS THAT THE MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA DEPEND ON.

GROWTH IN CORN AND SOYBEAN ACRES HAS MADE IT HARDER TO FIND WHEAT FIELDS IN SOME PARTS OF NORTH DAKOTA, BUT THE STATE IS STILL A LEADER IN WHEAT PRODUCTION.

THE ANNUAL WHEAT QUALITY TOUR FANNED OUT ACROSS NORTH DAKOTA AND NORTHWEST MINNESOTA THIS WEEK TO GAUGE THE PROSPECTS FOR THIS YEAR'S CROP.

THE TOUR IS LED BY WHEAT EXPERTS, BUT MANY OF THE PARTICIPANTS ARE FROM OTHER AREAS OF THE INDUSTRY, SUCH AS MILLING, BAKING AND TRADE.

THEY SAW A CROP THAT'S A FEW WEEKS BEHIND SCHEDULE DUE TO LATE PLANTING, BUT ONE THAT'S BENEFITTED FROM GREAT GROWING CONDITIONS AND SHOULD PRODUCE AN ABOVE AVERAGE CROP.

Ed Kessel: THERE'S MAYBE A LITTLE BIT OF TIP BACK, SOME OF THE HEADS DIDN'T FILL TO THE TOPS IN THE FIELDS THAT WE WERE AT, AND THERE IS SOME GRASSHOPPERS OUT THERE, SO MOISTURE. WE HAD SOME WE PLANTED REAL EARLY, THAT'S GOT ENOUGH TO FINISH OUT, BUT SOME OF THE LATER SEEDED CROP HAS GOT SOME SEASON AHEAD OF IT YET, SO PROBABLY A MONTH OR A LITTLE BETTER TIL HARVEST.

DESPITE LATE PLANTING FOR MANY FARMERS, THIS YEAR'S CROP COULD PUT NORTH DAKOTA AHEAD OF KANSAS IN WHEAT PRODUCTION.

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FOR THE PAST FEW WEEKS, WE'VE BEEN TOURING AROUND THE REGION, ON OUR ANNUAL AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR.

WE START THIS WEEK'S TOUR IN NORTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA, NEAR SOUTH SHORE.

Al Heuer: OUR CEREAL CROPS TAKE UP MORE THAN HALF THE RESEARCH THAT WE DO HERE.

AL HEUER IS THE MANAGER OF SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY'S NORTHEAST RESEARCH FARM NEAR THE TOWN OF SOUTH SHORE. LIKE MUCH OF THE REGION, THEY DIDN'T START PLANTING UNTIL THE FIRST WEEK OF MAY -- THREE WEEKS BEHIND WHEN THEY LIKE TO PLANT. STILL, HE SAYS THEIR CEREAL CROPS ARE LOOKING GOOD, FOR NOW. BUT RESEARCHERS AND FARMERS ALIKE ARE KEEPING THEIR FINGERS CROSSED THAT THEY WON'T BE HURT BY HOT SPELLS THAT HAVE BEEN COMING DURING A CRITICAL PERIOD FOR HEAD-FILLING.

Al Heuer: THE CROPS LOOK GOOD, BUT THE MATURITY iS OBVIOUSLY BEHIND AND NOW WE'RE DEALING WITH THE SUMMER HEAT, SO HOPEFULLY IT WON'T TAKE TOO MUCH EFFECT ON YIELD.

A GOOD YIELD YEAR HERE WOULD 100 BUSHELS AN ACRE FOR SPRING WHEAT, AND 150 BUSHELS-PLUS FOR OATS. HEUER SAYS IT'S HARD TO SAY WHAT THIS YEAR WILL BRING. AFTER A RAINY MAY, PRECIP HAS BEEN DOWN THROUGH JUNE AND JULY.

Al Heuer: IF WE CAN CATCH ANOTHER RAIN AND HELP THE GRAIN FILL, AND NOW THEY'RE TALKING FORECAST MAYBE A LITTLE BIT COOLER CONDITIONS, THAT'LL SURE HELP IN LATE MATURITY.

HEUER EXPECTS HARVEST WILL BE ABOUT THREE WEEKS BEHIND, BUT HE SAYS THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT THEY'RE SEEING RELATIVELY LOW DISEASE PRESSURE.

2669 223 Al Heuer: NOBODY'S OUT HERE ALONE, YOU KNOW, FIGHTING THE CONDITIONS. WE'RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER.

AT SOUTH SHORE, SOUTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES ON THE AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR.

JENNY: I'M HERE IN WILTON, NORTH DAKOTA ON THE AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR WITH JAMIE SCHURMHAMER OF HEFTY SEEDS. AND JAMIE, TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HOW THIS YEAR'S WHEAT CROP HAS BEEN.

Jamie Schurhamer: WE'RE A LITTLE EARLIER THAN PROBABLY MOST OF THE REGION IS, SO PLANTED TIMELY, PROBABLY THE BEST POTENTIALS WE'VE EVER SEEN AS FAR AS I SEE GOING FORWARD. LIKE, THE CROPS LOOK REALLY EVEN, THEY JUST LOOK REALLY GOOD, REALLY HIGH POTENTIALS.

AND WE'RE COMING OFF OF A DROUGHT YEAR, LIKE YOU SAID YOU GUYS STARTED OUT DRY. TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LAST YEAR'S CROP AND THIS YEAR'S CROP

Jamie Schurhamer: WELL LAST YEAR'S CROP THERE WASN'T ONE, RIGHT? I MEAN, MOST OF OUR WHEAT GOT HAYED. MOST OF OUR CORN GOT HAYED. LIKE WE JUST DIDN'T HAVE ANY CROP AT ALL. SO GOING INTO THIS ONE, I THINK WE FELT LIKE, YOU KNOW, WE WERE WORRIED RIGHT UP UNTIL THE TIME WE GOT THAT SNOW AND THEN EVERYTHING KIND OF FIXED ITSELF AND THEN ALONG WITH SOME, AGAIN, TIMELY RAINS WE HAVE THE BEST POTENTIAL EVER. SO WHAT I NOTICE MOSTLY IS JUST ATTITUDES, RIGHT? I MEAN, I STILL THINK FARMERS WERE PROFITABLE LAST YEAR, BUT THE ATTITUDE IS SO MUCH BETTER THIS YEAR BECAUSE OF THE POTENTIALS WE'RE HAVING.

NOW, WE'VE HAD A LOT MORE MOISTURE, MAYBE NOT SO MUCH HERE AS IN OTHER PARTS OF THE REGION, BUT STILL QUITE A BIT MORE THAN NORMAL. ARE WE SEEING ANY DISEASE PRESSURES BECAUSE OF THAT?

Jamie Schurhamer: YEAH, ABSOLUTELY. YOU KNOW, MOST OF THE GUYS WE'RE WORKING WITH ARE PRETTY PROGRESSIVE, SO WE'RE ACTUALLY DOING A FUNGICIDE WITH THE HERBICIDE APPLICATION. WE DID A LOT OF ACRES ON THE FLAG LEAF THIS YEAR AS WELL. AND THEN ABSOLUTELY EVERYBODY DID A HEAD SCAB APPLICATION. AND YOU KNOW, PART OF THE PROBLEM WITH THOSE HEAD SCAB APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN JUST PRODUCT AVAILABILITY. I KNOW NOW, YOU KNOW, WE WERE ONE OF THE FIRST ONES IN THE AREA, BUT AS PRODUCT IS SHIFTING AROUND HERE, I KNOW SOME PLACES ARE REALLY SHORT, BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY ACRES ARE GETTING DONE THIS YEAR.

JENNY: IN WILTON, NORTH DAKOTA, I'M JENNY SCHLECHT ON THE AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR.

THE AGWEEK CEREALS CROP TOUR IS SPONSORED BY HEFTY SEED COMPANY OF WILTON AND HURDSFIELD, NORTH DAKOTA... CORTEVA AGRISCIENCE, AND MOSAIC

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, MINNESOTA FARMERS GET THEIR SAY IN WHAT THEY'D LIKE IN THE 2023 FARM BILL.

CROP AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS, EMERGING FARMERS AND FOOD PROGRAMS ALL HAVE A LOT AT STAKE IN THE NEXT FARM BILL. A U.S. HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE HELD A LISTENING SESSION IN NORTHFIELD, MINNESOTA THIS WEEK, TO HEAR WHAT STAKEHOLDERS WANT IN THE 2023 FARM BILL.

SOUTHEAST MINNESOTANS HAD THE CHANCE TO TELL POLICYMAKERS WHAT THEY WANT TO SEE IN THE NEXT FARM BILL.

Farmer: I'D APPRECIATE YOU GUYS HAVING YOUR EARS OPEN...

MEMBERS OF A HOUSE AG SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMODITIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT CAME TO A NORTHFIELD FARM TO LISTEN.

Reginaldo: For as much as we know how to do, and as good as we are at it, we have gotten zero! Zero support from the federal government.

MINNESOTA REPRESENTATIVE ANGIE CRAIG SAYS THESE SESSIONS ARE AN IMPORTANT WAY TO HEAR ABOUT THE CHALLENGES FACING LARGE AND SMALL PRODUCERS.

Rep. Angie Craig: CROP INSURANCE, OBVIOUSLY THAT TITLE REMAINS A SUPER, SUPER IMPORTANT ELEMENT OF THE FARM BILL. AND MAKING SURE THAT WE BUILD OUT THE CONSERVATION TITLE.

DAN GLESSING, PRESIDENT OF THE MINNESOTA FARM BUREAU, ECHOED THE STATEMENTS OF SEVERAL FARMERS AT THE EVENT, ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF CROP INSURANCE PROTECTIONS.

Dan Glessing: I THINK THE RECURRING THEME IS THAT THIS FARM BILL THAT WE CURRENTLY HAVE IS GOOD. YOU KNOW, JUST SOME TWEAKS HERE AND THERE BUT LET'S KEEP THAT INTEGRITY, BECAUSE IT HAS WORKED FAIRLY WELL FOR OUR FARMERS.

THEY ALSO HEARD FROM AGENCIES COVERED BY THE BILL, LIKE SNAP AND EMERGENCY FOOD PROGRAMS. REPRESENTATIVE CHERI BUSTOS OF ILLINOIS SAYS THEY'LL WORK TO CRAFT A GOOD BILL.

Rep. Cheri Bustos: WHAT DO WE START DOING, STOP DOING, KEEP DOING THAT WE CAN TAKE OUT OF THE CURRENT FARM BILL. AND AS WE LOOK AT THAT, WHAT CAN WE AFFORD TO DO?

THIS WAS THE FOURTH LISTENING SESSION AROUND THE COUNTRY.

IF YOU DRIVE ALONG 1-94 NEAR THE TWIN CITIES, YOU'VE PROBABLY SEEN THE SIGNS FOR "FAMO FEEDS". THEIR BIG SIGN STANDS ALONG THE INTERSTATE NEAR FREEPORT MINNESOTA. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE ON THIS "HIGH PROFILE" COMPANY IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mikkel Pates: FAMO FEEDS AND ITS PREDECESSORS HAVE BEEN AROUND SINCE 1903.

John Beste: FARMERS WOULD BRING IN SOME OF THEIR GRAINS, AND THEY WOULD EXCHANGE THEIR WHEAT FOR FLOUR BACK IN THOSE DAYS.

FAMO FEEDS HAS GROWN AND CHANGED CONSIDERABLY SINCE THE THELEN FAMILY ESTABLISHED IT AS A FLOUR MILL AND FEED MILL IN THE EARLY 19 HUNDREDS. THE FEED PART OF THE BUSINESS EVENTUALLY SPLIT OFF, AND THE BESTE FAMILY HAS OWNED IT FOR MORE THAN FORTY YEARS. A FIRE IN ONE OF THEIR PLANTS IN 2002 LED THE BESTES TO REBUILD AND REBRAND ON A PROMINENT SITE ALONG THE INTERSTATE. TODAY IT'S ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF FAMILY-OWNED FEED MANUFACTURERS IN MINNESOTA WITH ITS OWN BRAND. PRESIDENT JOHN BESTE SAYS THE KEY TO THEIR SUCCESS IS SIMPLE.

John Beste: QUALITY AND CUSTOMER SERVICE. THE FARM LIKES CONSISTENCY. ANIMALS LIKE CONSISTENCY.

FAMO PRODUCES FEEDS, STARTER FEEDS, AND SUPPLEMENTS ALONG WITH A VARIETY OF ANIMAL NUTRITION PRODUCTS FOR A WHOLE RANGE OF SPECIES. THEY SELL TO PRODUCERS AND DEALERS ALL OVER THE UPPER MIDWEST, AS FAR AS COLORADO. BESTE FARMS HAVE CHANGED A LOT IN RECENT DECADES, AND SO HAS THEIR COMPANY.

John Beste: TODAY WE ARE 99 PERCENT DISTRIBUTION ORIENTED. WE HAVE JUST A SMALL HANDFUL OF CUSTOMERS IN THIS FREEPORT AREA THAT WE HAD FROM TWENTY YEARS AGO, OR THIRTY YEARS AGO. BUT OTHER THAN THAT, WE SELL WHOLESALE, WE MANUFACTURE, DELIVER TO OTHER FEED DEALERS IN THE UPPER MIDWEST AND THEN THEY ADD THE GRAINS AND CERTAIN PRODUCTS AND SELL RETAIL. SO OUR BUSINESS HAS CHANGED QUITE A BIT.

VETERINARIAN KENNETH SWANSON IS FAMO'S DIRECTOR OF RUMINANT NUTRITION. HE SAYS FAMO IS EXPERT AT MAKING FEED PELLETS THAT ASSURE ANIMALS THE RIGHT NUTRITION IN EVERY BITE.

Kenneth Swanson: WE OFFER THE SAME, YOU KNOW, TECHNICAL ABILITY, TECHNICAL SKILLS THAT YOU GET FROM WORKING WITH MORE THE NATIONAL BRANDS, BUT WE'RE MUCH MORE NIMBLE, AND WE CAN MAKE DECISIONS MUCH FASTER.

Mikkel Pates: SO WHILE THE LIVESTOCK BUSINESS ALWAYS CHANGES, FAMO FEEDS HOPES TO CHANGE WITH IT. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT FREEPORT, MINNESOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

FREEPORT, MINNESOTA IS ALSO HOME TO THE SWANY WHITE FLOUR MILL.

SWANY IS ONE OF THE STATE'S LONGEST-RUNNING FAMILY-OWNED FLOUR MILLS. IN FACT, IT SHARES A HISTORY WITH FAMO FEEDS.

SWANY WAS ALSO STARTED IN 1903, BY THE THELEN FAMILY, WHICH ALSO STARTED THE FEED MILL THAT BECAME FAMO. TODAY, GARY THELEN IS PRESIDENT AND OWNER OF SWANY.

FIRE DESTROYED THE PLANT IN 2011, AND THEY QUIT MILLING WHITE FLOUR WHEN THEY REBUILT. BUT THEY MAKE A VARIETY OF OTHER PRODUCTS, INCLUDING BAKING MIXES AND WHOLE WHEAT, RYE AND BUCKWHEAT FLOUR. HE SELLS MOSTLY THROUGH SMALL RETAILERS.

Gary Thelen: I'VE GOT THE RETAILER STORE HERE, PLUS I'VE GOT CUSTOMERS YOU KNOW, LIKE FARMERS MARKETS, AND YOU KNOW, JUST LITTLE MOM AND POP BUSINESSES THAT BUY STUFF AND YOU KNOW, SELL IT IN THEIR STORES.

WHILE THELEN STILL MILLS SPECIALTY FLOURS, IT BUYS HIGH-PROTEIN WHITE FLOUR FROM CARGILL AND REPACKS IT WITH THE SWANY WHITE LABEL.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, MAKING YOUR AG SPRAYING MORE EFFICIENT..

WILL AUGUST BRING MORE HEAT? HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

EMILY: WELCOME BACK TO AGWEEK TV. JOINING ME TODAY IS JASON DANNELLY WITH AG SPRAY EQUIPMENT, RIGHT OUTSIDE OF FARGO.

Jason Dannelly: We're one of the industry leaders in spraying equipment, manufacturing a spraying equipment and distribution of liquid handling and liquid application equipment.

So you guys have been in this industry for quite a long time.

Jason Dannelly: AG Spray Equipment did start in 1965, and then in 2014, AG Spray Equipment made the acquisition of Horvik manufacturing, and that's where we are today.

So the ag industry has really changed over the years. How has that impacted how you work with dealers?

Jason Dannelly: Well, one of the big things that we've found in the last couple of years that's impacted our dealers is just the way that agricultural business on the spraying and liquid application side has changed. And one of the biggest things that came with that has been increased rate of spraying water with whatever chemical it is. We've gone out and we've looked for opportunities to give our customers larger capacities in their trailer setups, in their sprayer setups, so that they don't have to haul that water around quite as much. And they can have more water on hand with some of our semi trailer setups and some of our larger tank setups that we have at different farm locations.

How have you guys been impacted by the supply chain issue?

Jason: So with our nine locations across the country, if we have an item that we've fallen short on here in Fargo, we're able to go to our Columbus, Nebraska location or our Bakersfield, California location or Dothan, Alabama, and get the proper product in here to be able to take care of our customers in a short period of time.

So do you have anything exciting and new rolling out for your customers here soon?

Jason: We do. We've got some existing products that came to market about a year ago that are really starting to take off in our smart transfer systems, our STS systems, as well as some of the precision application equipment that we have on on the side of of being able to batch certain chemicals and batch certain fertilizers into systems like the Durham meter and the Praxidyne Mix Mate. So these are items that we've started representing in the last year that our customers have really liked.

Jason Danley with AG Spray Equipment, thank you so much for joining us today.

STILL AHEAD, IT'S THE BIGGEST WEEK OF THE YEAR FOR SOME 4-H KIDS...

THIS HAS BEEN STATE FAIR WEEK IN NORTH DAKOTA, AN ESPECIALLY EXCITING TIME FOR YOUNG EXHIBITORS.

CODY FREEBERG AND JERAN HUGHES WERE AMONG ABOUT 83-HUNDRED 4-H MEMBERS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE STATE FAIR IN MINOT. THE TWO ARE FROM RAMSEY COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA. CODY AND JERAN WERE BOTH PRESENTED WITH AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE FOR THEIR AG-FOCUSED PROJECT EXPO ENTRIES.

Jeran Hughes: I THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE A REALLY FUN PROJECT BECAUSE I'M SUPER INTERESTED IN PIGS. I SHOW PIGS, I DO A BUNCH OF THINGS WITH PIGS. THE GOOD THING ABOUT SHOWING PIGS IS AFTER YOU'RE DONE SHOWING THEM YOU CAN EAT THEM.

Cody Freeberg: THE KIND OF LIFE SKILLS ON WHAT CAN BECOME IN LIFE AND AND WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN.

Leigh Ann Skurupey: WHERE WE'RE MAKING SURE THAT WE'RE BUILDING THOSE LIFE SKILLS TO GET TO THE STATE FAIR.UNDERSTANDING THAT IT'S NOT REALLY ABOUT THE PROJECT, IT'S ABOUT THE PERSON MAKING THAT PROJECT. THAT'S OUR END RESULT.

SKURUPEY SAYS THESE DAYS 4-H ENCOMPASSES A VARIETY OF SKILLS AND INTERESTS, AND THEY'RE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

UNION MEMBERS HAVE REJECTED A CONTRACT OFFER FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR.

AND WE LOOK AT HOW FAR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA'S "FOREVER GREEN" INITIATIVE HAS COME SINCE IT WAS FOUNDED A DECADE AGO

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM, TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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