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AgweekTV Full Show: Animal ag in ND, State Mill tour, farm counseling, Dakota Dirt coffee

This week on AgweekTV, we'll take a look at some of the reasons why North Dakota trails neighboring states in animal agriculture and what some of the opportunities are. We'll give you a rare look inside the North Dakota State Mill as it celebrates 100 years. A farm counseling program for today's agriculture. A rural business offers a new kind of bean to consumers.

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This week on AgweekTV, we'll take a look at some of the reasons why North Dakota trails neighboring states in animal agriculture and what some of the opportunities are. We'll give you a rare look inside the North Dakota State Mill as it celebrates 100 years. A farm counseling program for today's agriculture. A rural business offers a new kind of bean to consumers.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

NORTH DAKOTA TRAILS SOME OF ITS NEIGHBORING STATES IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE. IN OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY THIS WEEK,

JEFF BEACH TALKED TO FOLKS TRYING TO CHANGE THAT.

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EMILY, I VISITED WITH MANY PEOPLE TO FIND OUT WHY NORTH DAKOTA LAGS IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE...AND WHAT POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS ARE.

Justin Quandt: WE'VE HAD CATTLE FOR AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER.

JUSTIN QUANDT FARMS WITH HIS FAMILY NEAR OAKES, NORTH DAKOTA. IN RECENT YEARS, THEY'VE ADDED PIGS TO THE MIX. BUT THE QUANDTS DON'T OWN THE HOGS, THEY'RE RAISING THEM FOR AN INTEGRATOR IN SOUTH DAKOTA, WHO PAYS THEM TO CARE FOR THEM UNTIL THEY ARE MARKET WEIGHT.

Justin Quandt: OUR DUTIES ARE TO KEEP THE BARN HEATED, COOLED IN THE SUMMER, PAY THE ELECTRICITY BILLS, LOOK FOR SICK ONES TO TAKE CARE OF, TAKE CARE OF THE ANIMAL HEALTH, ORDER THE FEED WHEN WE NEED MORE FEED AND THEN HE PAYS US THE RENT PER PIG SPACE.

Jeff Beach: THERE ARE SEVERAL REASONS WHY NORTH DAKOTA TRAILS ITS NEIGHBORS IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE.

*hog sounds*

AMONG THE REASONS GIVEN ARE THE STATE'S ANTI- CORPORATE FARMING LAWS, PROHIBITIVE LOCAL ORDINANCES, AND NEIGHBORS' FEARS ABOUT THE SMELL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE. BUT AMBER BOESHANS OF THE NORTH DAKOTA LIVESTOCK ALLIANCE SAYS THE STATE'S LOW POPULATION DENSITY LENDS ITSELF PERFECTLY TO ANIMAL AG.

Amber Boeshans: OUR HIGH HEALTH BIOSECURITY OPTIONS UP HERE, NOBODY ELSE HAS THAT OPPORTUNITY RIGHT NOW. I MEAN, WE ARE A CLEAN SLATE FOR GROWING THESE HEALTHY PIGS.

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SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY LIVESTOCK SPECIALIST BOB THALER SAYS OVER THE PAST TWENTY YEARS, SOUTH DAKOTA HAS PROVEN THESE OPERATIONS ARE SAFE AND CLEAN. THE STATE HAS TWO MILLION HOGS, COMPARED TO NORTH DAKOTA'S 150-THOUSAND.

Bob Thaler: WHEN WE TALK ABOUT GROWING THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY, WE WANT TO DO IT RESPONSIBLY. WE WANT TO HAVE IT IN THE RIGHT PLACE, WERE IT'S NOT GOING TO BOTHER THE NEIGHBORS, WE'RE PROTECTING WATER, WE'RE PROTECTING LAKES AND STREAMS AND THE ENVIRONMENT.

THERE'S ALSO A BIG POTENTIAL BENEFIT TO THE MANURE, ESPECIALLY WITH RISING FERTILIZER PRICES. CRAIG JAROLIMEK RAISES HOGS IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA. HE SAYS THERE ARE SEVERAL REASONS HOGS WOULD BE A GOOD FIT FOR THE STATE..

Craig Jarolimek: WE HAVE A LOT OF LAND BASE WE HAVE A LOT OF GRAIN. YOU KNOW, THOSE ARE HUGE ASSETS.

JAROLIMEK SAYS IT MAY TAKE SOME CONVINCING TO GET FARMERS TO GET INTO ANIMAL AG, BUT HE SAYS IT'S ALSO IMPORTANT TO WORK WITH THE LOCAL COMMUNITY TO ASSURE RESIDENTS THE OPERATION WILL BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR.

Craig Jarolimek: IT'S THE SAME CONSTANT RESTRICTIONS WITH COMMUNITIES AND WITH PERMITTING EVERY TIME. AND SO IF YOU GET OUT IN FRONT OF THOSE AND UNDERSTAND THEM, AND WORK WITH A COMMUNITY THAT WANTS AN ANIMAL LIVESTOCK OPERATION, IT BECOMES MORE ADVANTAGEOUS TO TRY A SITE THERE. MAYBE SOMEDAY WE'LL ACTUALLY HAVE COMMUNITIES FIGHTING TO HAVE A HOG OPERATION. WOULDN'T THAT BE PRETTY COOL?>\

A BYPRODUCT OF ANIMAL AG COULD BE A VALUABLE COMMODITY...MANURE.

THE HUGE PRICE SWINGS IN COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER, AND INTEREST IN SOIL HEALTH BENEFITS, HAVE MORE FARMERS LOOKING TO SPREAD MANURE. MIKE KELLER, VICE PRESIDENT OF ADM, WHICH IS A 75% OWNER OF THE GREEN BISON SOY PROCESSING PLANT, SAYS HAVING ANIMAL AG IN NORTH DAKOTA WOULD HELP ADM WITH ITS GOAL OF REDUCING FARM EMISSIONS BY 25% BY 2035.

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Mike Keller: SO THAT'S A SIGNIFICANT INITIATIVE, SIGNIFICANT UNDERTAKING. AND THAT COULD BE ONE WHERE YOU INCORPORATE THAT MANURE ASPECT OF THE OPERATION TO HELP ACCOMPLISH SOME OF THOSE GOALS.

Justin Quandt: ALL OUR MANURE, WE HAVE PIPELINES GOING ALONG THIS ROAD, BOTH DIRECTIONS, SO WE'RE PIPING IT STRAIGHT TO THE FIELD. IT'S ALL SELF CONTAINED. IT GOES STRAIGHT TO A RIG IN THE FIELD THAT APPLIES IT.

EXPERTS SAY A 24-HUNDRED HEAD FINISHING BARN WILL PROVIDE 35,000 DOLLARS WORTH OF FERTILIZER,

AND A TEN PERCENT YIELD BUMP IN CORN.

Great story, thanks Jeff.

FOR MORE ON OUR COVER STORY, CHECK OUT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR AGWEEK.COM .

HARVEST SEASON HAS OFFICIALLY STARTED IN SOUTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA. DAN MUND FARMS IN MILNOR, WHERE HE RAISES SOYBEAN, CORN, AND OTHER COMMODITIES DEPENDING ON THE YEAR. DUE TO THE WET SPRING, MUND SAID OVER 500 OF HIS 2,100 ACRES WENT TO PREVENT PLANT THIS YEAR. HE SAYS HIS SOYBEAN HARVEST HAS BEEN A MIXED BAG, DEPENDING ON THE FIELD. BUT HE SAYS, IN GENERAL, FARMERS IN HIS AREA ARE PLEASED WITH HOW THEIR BEANS ARE TURNING OUT.

Dan: People are pretty happy with their bean yields, I know I worried all year long about not making my bean contracts and getting excited when beans hit 11.50 and then of course we saw them go way up.

MUND ESTIMATES HIS SOYBEAN YIELD WILL BE ABOUT 40 BUSHELS AN ACRE.

FARMING AND RANCHING ARE EXTREMELY STRESSFUL, AND IT AFFECTS THE WHOLE FAMILY. BUT NDSU IS A PARTNER IN GRANTS TO HELP PAY FOR COUNSELING, AND YOU DON'T EVEN HAVE TO LEAVE HOME. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE ON THE FARM TO FARM COUNSELING PROGRAM.

Mikkel Pates: THE USDA FARM AND RANCH STRESS GRANT IS BRINGING COUNSELING HELP TO RURAL NORTH DAKOTA.

Becky Kopp Dunham: IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW HARD YOU WORK ON YOUR FARM AND RANCH. THERE ARE SO MANY FACTORS OUT OF THEIR CONTROL THAT CAN IMPACT THEIR SUCCESS.

SOME OF THOSE FACTORS, LIKE WEATHER, MARKETS AND INPUT COSTS, ARE OUT OF A FARMER'S CONTROL. BUT THERAPIST BECKY KOPP DUNHAM SAYS THAT THERE ARE SOME THINGS A FARMER CAN DO TO REGAIN A FEELING OF CONTROL. LIKE SEEKING PROFESSIONAL HELP.

Becky Kopp Dunham: IT'S ALWAYS VERY SATISFYING TO MEET WITH SOMEONE AND YOU SEE THE SHOULDER DROP, AND THEY FEEL GOOD THAT THEY'RE FINALLY TALKING TO SOMEBODY.

THE USDA GRANT PROGRAM IN NORTH DAKOTA PAYS FOR SEVERAL EFFORTS, INCLUDING THE "FARM TO FARM SERVICES" COUNSELING PROGRAM. HERE, NDSU CONTRACTS WITH A GROUP OF THERAPISTS, INCLUDING KOPP DUNHAM, TO OFFER LOW OR NO COST COUNSELING TO FARMERS AND RANCHERS. IT MAY BE ONLINE OR IN PERSON.

Sean Brotherson: AND THAT GIVES US THE ABILITY TO EXPAND THE AMOUNT OF SERVICES AND SUPPORTS THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO OUR AGRICULTURAL FOLKS IN THE STATE.

KOPP DUNHAM SAYS SUICIDE RATES HAVE RISEN AN ALARMING 57 PERCENT IN NORTH DAKOTA OVER THE PAST TWENTY YEARS, AND SHE SAYS GETTING HELP CAN BENEFIT RURAL FAMILIES, POSSIBLY FOR GENERATIONS.

Becky Kopp Dunham: THE FUTURE GENERATIONS OF OUR FARMERS AND RANCHERS ARE WATCHING US ALL OF THE TIME, FOR THE GOOD AND FOR THE BAD, AND SO I'M HOPING THAT WE'RE GOING TO DO A BETTER JOB OF MODELING HOW TO HANDLE THIS STRESS SO THAT THEY CAN LEARN FROM US AS WELL, AND WE CAN CHANGE THAT STATISTIC.

IN FARGO, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

BROTHERSON HOPES CONGRESS CAN INCLUDE FUNDING FOR THE PROGRAM IN THE NEXT FARM BILL, SO IT CAN CONTINUE.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL GIVE YOU A RARE LOOK INSIDE THE NORTH DAKOTA MILL, AS IT CELEBRATES 100 YEARS.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STATE MILL AND ELEVATOR TURNS 100 THIS MONTH. RECENTLY WE HAD THE CHANCE TO TOUR THE MILL, AND GIVE YOU A LOOK INSIDE.

music begins, fades under...

Dillon Janousek: The white silos there are the original two 1922, along with the terminal elevator. There's still equipment in this terminal elevator that is original to 1922. Total capacity of storage is about 5.3 million bushels. That's with all of the silos and the terminal elevator. If we were completely full with 5.3 million bushels, our facility would run about 40 days.

This is our rail load out areas two cars on each track that will be cleaned prior to us being able to load them. So we have vacuum cleaners that we clean out the inside. This is our newest dump pit. We unload truck and rail in here. Dumping capacity is 40,000 bushels an hour. This pit that they're dumping in here will hold an entire railcar, which is about 33, 3,500 bushels.

The terminal elevator is the white building. That's right at 180 feet. So here we're standing on the roof of our G. Mill building behind me, you'll see the tallest building in the city of Grand Forks. Our cleaning house is just under 200 feet.

Luke Dudgeon: And today you're looking at all four of our pack lines, obviously we have a small pack. Our main line, which is a 50 pound pack line. We also have a whole wheat pack line and a secondary 50 pound white flower pack line. So here we're on our second floor of our G, H AND I mill. These are some of our roller mills that grind up the wheat to make flour.

This is where that all berry wheat comes in. The first step in the process.

Dillon Janousek: And this is our flour sifters running. The flour comes in the top and it gets sifted and separated into particle size or granulation.

For the most part, one person runs this whole building. Seven floors. He can make all his adjustments and things he needs on. On computers. It's very automated. These systems are monitoring itself at all times.

Also, he's checking samples for quality every hour to make sure that everything is running correctly and being done, you know, to the spec that the customer wants.

*music up, then ends gradually...

THE MILL OPENED ON OCTOBER 20TH, 1922.

THE "FOOD AG IDEAS" CONFERENCE IN SAINT PAUL AIMED TO FIND SOLUTIONS TO FOOD ISSUES AROUND THE WORLD, AND HERE AT HOME.

MANY THINGS ARE AFFECTING THE FOOD SUPPLY RIGHT NOW, INCLUDING HURRICANES, DROUGHT, FIRES AND GEOPOLITICAL CONFLICT.

ALLISON HOHN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF GROW NORTH, SAYS THEY LOOKED AT EVERYTHING THAT'S HAPPENING IN THE WORLD, AND THE STATE, TRYING TO FIND ANSWERS TO SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTIONS AND OTHER THINGS KEEPING PEOPLE FROM GETTING THE FOOD THEY NEED. SESSION TOPICS INCLUDED COMPANY SUSTAINABILITY, SUPPLY CHAINS AND FOOD INSECURITY.

Allison Hohn: WE RECOGNIZE HERE IN MINNESOTA THAT THERE'S A LOT OF SOCIO- ECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN, YOU KNOW, THE TYPES OF PEOPLE WHO ARE GETTING HEALTHY, NUTRITIOUS FOOD. AND SO WE REALLY WANTED TO TALK ABOUT TOPICS THAT IMPACTED ALL THAT.

COMPANIES PARTICIPATING IN THE CONFERENCE INCLUDED SUN-OPTA, J.T. MEGA AND CARGILL.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, THREE FARM FRIENDS ARE BREWING UP BUSINESS, WITH DAKOTA DIRT.

WITH DRIER CONDITIONS, COULD THE REGION BE HEADED TOWARDS DROUGHT?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

THREE NORTH DAKOTA MEN ARE BRINGING PREMIUM COFFEE BLENDS RIGHT TO THE MIDWEST. I VISITED DAKOTA DIRT COFFEE IN MILNOR, TO GET A TASTE OF THEIR PREMIUM BEANS.

This is green coffee. It's raw. We bring it in as this.

*sound of coffee being scooped into bucket*

Landon: We ultimately landed on coffee because we all drink coffee quite a bit

BROTHERS LANDON AND WYATT MUND AND THEIR FRIEND BEAU GOOLSBEY GREW UP TOGETHER. THEY HAD BEEN WANTING TO START A BUSINESS AND DECIDED TO CREATE DAKOTA DIRT COFFEE. THEY IMPORT PREMIUM COFFEE BEANS FROM ALL AROUND THE WORLD. THEY ROAST, PACKAGE AND SHIP THEIR PREMIUM BLENDS IN THEIR ROASTING FACILITY IN MILNOR. LANDON MUND FARMS IN THE AREA AND HAS ENJOYED LEARNING ABOUT THE COMMODITY OF COFFEE BEANS

Landon:So this is green coffee, and this is what the coffee looks like. It's raw, and we bring it in as this.

For me as a farmer, it is really cool to see those similarities. Working with a specific commodity,I know on our farm we farm corn and soybeans and so there are a lot of similarities. We're bringing in a product that they have planted and harvested and brought to market.

THE NAMES OF THEIR PREMIUM COFFEE BLENDS WERE INSPIRED BY THE MIDWEST, LIKE FROZEN TUNDRA, FLATLANDER, KICKIN ' UP DUST AND BUCK FEVER. THEIR MIDWESTERN CHARM GOT THE ATTENTION OF TRACTOR SUPPLY COMPANY WHO WILL BE SELLING DAKOTA DIRT IN THEIR STORES STARTING IN NOVEMBER. A BIG STEP FOR THE COMPANY AS THEY ARE CURRENTLY JUST AN E-COMMERCE BUSINESS.

Order up!

WYATT: It's honestly the perfect retail partner for us. Tractor Supply is our core demographic. I mean we're all about small town America and that's kind of what our coffee, if you take a look at the bag it's positioned around midwest attitude

THEY HOPE TO EVENTUALLY USE THE FRONT HALF OF THEIR ROASTING FACILITY AS A COFFEE DRIVE THRU AND A PLACE WHERE CUSTOMERS CAN ENJOY A WARM CUP OF JOE.

BEAU: What's lacking in small towns is things to do. That's one of the big things in the area is that we want to serve our community in, is give somebody something to come out and keep busy doing on the weekends.

DAKOTA DIRT IS SELLING THEIR COFFEE FOR A CURE BLEND DURING OCTOBER FOR BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH. FIVE DOLLARS FROM EACH BAG SOLD WILL GO TO THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL SHOW YOU A PLACE WHERE SHEEP ARE PAR FOR THE COURSE..

IN NEW YORK MILLS, MINNESOTA... THERE'S A PLACE WHERE GOLF CARTS AREN'T THE ONLY THINGS ROAMING THE GREENS.

BALHEPBURN IS PARTLY GOLF COURSE AND PARTLY PASTURE...THAT'S HOME TO SHEEP. IN FACT, IT'S ANYTHING BUT 'PAR FOR THE COURSE.'

IT MEANS HOUSE OF HEPBURN AND IT'S A FARM IN SCOTLAND.

IT'S ALSO A FARM IN OTTERTAIL COUNTY. ONE KNOWN MORE FOR DRIVING A GOLF BALL-- THAN DRIVING A TRACTOR.

JOHN LAURITSEN: WHAT IS THE MOST DIFFICULT PART OF THE GOLF COURSE?

BERT NELSON: EVERY HOLE. THERE IS NO EASY HOLE.

AND NO GIMMES EITHER. ABOUT 30 YEARS AGO HOWARD LEGRIED, A FORMER TENNIS PLAYER AND VETERINARIAN, CAME UP WITH THE IDEA FOR A 9-HOLE GOLF COURSE ON HIS FARM. HE WANTED HIS DAUGHTER TO HAVE A PLACE TO PLAY.

HOWARD LEGRIED: WE HAVE GRASS TRAPS. QUITE A FEW GRASS TRAPS. AND WE PLAY THEM THE SAME RULES AS SAND TRAPS.

HE ALSO HAS RAISED PUTTING GREENS ALONG WITH FENCES AND GATES. SPEND A FEW MINUTES ON THE COURSE AND YOU'LL SEE WHY.

IT IS NICE TO HAVE AN AUDIENCE WHEN YOU'RE HITTING, RIGHT?

AND THEY'RE QUIET. VERY RESPECTFUL

AT BALHEPBURN, THE SHEEP ROAM FREELY. THEY'RE NOT JUST LIVESTOCK, THEY'RE NATURAL GROUNDSKEEPERS WHO KEEP THE GRASS IN WORKING ORDER. IT'S UP TO THE GOLFERS TO PLAY AROUND THEM.

YOU EVER HIT A SHEEP BEFORE?

SEVERAL.

I HAVE.

YEAH.

HOW DO YOU PLAY THAT? IS THAT A HAZARD, OR HOW DOES THAT WORK?

PLAY IT WHERE IT LIES. PLAY IT WHERE IT LIES, ABSOLUTELY.

IT DOESN'T HAPPEN VERY OFTEN AND NO SHEEP HAVE EVER BEEN HURT. BUT IT DOES MAKE FOR SOME INTERESTING INTERACTIONS.

LATHAM HETLAND: I HAVE HAD SHEEP KICK BALLS CLOSER TO THE GREEN BEFORE. AND THAT'S REALLY HELPFUL.

HE HIT THE GATE!

EACH HOLE HAS A UNIQUE NAME LIKE ROCKY TOP, THE GAUNTLET AND EASY DOES IT.

FORE! OR BAAAAHH! WHICH ONE DO YOU SAY WHEN SHEEP ARE INVOLVED?

IT'S ALL PART OF WHAT MAKES BALHEPBURN A TRADITION, AND A FARM, UNLIKE ANY OTHER.

AT 89 YEARS OLD, HOWARD SAYS HE STILL GOLFS THE COURSE YEAR-ROUND...EVEN IN THE WINTER!

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK.

SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA FARMERS EXPECT MOSTLY ABOVE AVERAGE YIELDS FOR CORN AND SOYBEANS THIS YEAR.

AND SUGARBEET HARVEST GETS UNDERWAY, THOUGH HEAT CAUSES SOME DELAYS.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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