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AgweekTV Full Show: 30 by 30, renewable diesel, Levos Farms goats, Ditterich Mercantile

This week on AgweekTV, an ambitious new conservation initiative is raising questions among farmers. We'll talk about the potential impact of renewable diesel on the country. We'll meet a North Dakota farmer breeding show goats. And a Minnesota farmer turns smalltown grocer.

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This week on AgweekTV, an ambitious new conservation initiative is raising qusetions among farmers. We'll talk about the potential impact of renewable diesel on the country. We'll meet a North Dakota farmer breeding show goats. And a Minnesota farmer turns smalltown grocer.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION HAS SET AMBITIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS FOR AMERICA.

THE "30 BY 30" PROGRAM CALLS FOR COVERING 30% OF AMERICAN LAND WITH CONSERVATION MEASURES, BY THE YEAR 2030. SOME FEAR A GOVERNMENT OVERREACH, BUT POPULAR FEDERAL CONSERVATION PROGRAMS ARE LARGELY VOLUNTARY, AND FOR SET TIME PERIODS. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

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Lewis Heaton: THE FIRST THING YOU NEED TO DO IS TO HAVE SOMETHING THAT HAS THE INCENTIVE FOR PROFITABILITY ON YOUR RANCH YOU KNOW.

FARMER-RANCHER LEWIS HEATON AND HIS FAMILY HAVE A TEN THOUSAND ACRE OPERATION, OF WHICH HALF IS CROPPED. THE FAMILY GROWS CORN, SOYBEANS AND WHEAT AND THEY HAVE MORE THAN FIVE HUNDRED HEAD IN A COW-CALF HERD IN CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA. HE GOT INTERESTED IN NO-TILL FARMING IN THE 90'S... HIS FIRST STEP INTO THE CONSERVATION MOVEMENT. SINCE THEN HE'S ADDED OTHER MEASURES, INCLUDING A GRAZING SYSTEM.

Lewis Heaton: THERE'S QUITE A FEW THINGS THAT WE'VE LEARNED OVER THE YEARS THAT REALLY DO HELP, NOT ONLY YOUR SOIL HEALTH BUT IT'S A BIG BENEFIT FOR SOCIETY IN GENERAL I WOULD SAY. PLUS YOUR OWN RANCH.

HEATON IS AMONG THOSE ENROLLED IN THE POPULAR CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM. WHILE SOME FARM GROUPS AND POLITICAL PUNDITS FEAR 30 BY 30 MIGHT TURN INTO SOME TYPE OF "LAND GRAB" BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, TODD HAGEL OF THE STATE'S NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE SAYS IT'S ACTUALLY A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWERS TO IMPROVE THEIR LAND.

0637 Todd Hagel: WHAT ARE YOUR RESOURCE CONCERNS? WE'LL DO AN ASSESSMENT ON YOUR PROPERTY, AND THEN WE WHAT WE DO IS WE WOULD THEN LOOK AT WHICH PROGRAM IS MOST APPROPRIATE TO ADDRESS YOUR CONCERNS.

Lewis Heaton: WHEN YOU CAN BUILD YOUR SOIL ORGANIC MATTER, WHETHER IT'S IN FARMLAND OR WHETHER IT'S IN RANGELAND, THE BENEFITS ARE THE SAME, YOU KNOW, YOU'LL GET INCREASED PRODUCTION.

NEAR MCKENZIE, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

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THERE ARE MANY CHALLENGERS FOR PRODUCERS RIGHT NOW, BUT THERE ARE ALSO OPPORTUNITIES.

JEFF BEACH TALKED WITH KENT BEADLE, THE DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION BROKERAGE AT CHS, ABOUT MARKET DISRUPTORS, SPECIFICALLY, THE IMPACT OF RENEWABLE DIESEL ON THE COUNTRY.

Jeff Beach: One of the big disruptors is the momentum toward renewable fuels. Tell us what you see there.

Kent Beadle: Well, obviously, renewable diesel has been a fairly big story here for the last eight, ten months. It's been kind of pushed to the background since the Ukraine invasion and also with all the inflationary forces that we've had in the economy. We don't hear so much about it. But we think that that momentum is still there. Right now, you know, we see projections saying that we need 40 million pounds of soybean oil by 2024.

Current 2223 projection for renewable diesel usage is 12 million pounds. So clearly there's a huge ramp upwards that is going on in order to fulfill this demand that is clearly keeping the price of soybean oil elevated. It's keeping crush margins elevated, which is providing the incentive to build more soybean crushing facilities to ultimately meet this demand.

Jeff: What about how that translates into the crop mix in the future?

Kent Beadle: Well, ultimately, you know, you see a couple of broad trends. You see more soybean acres in order to meet this demand that are going to replace some of the corn acres that you're going to lose as you have less ethanol demand over the time frame that you're shifting toward a larger mix of electric vehicles. We actually think that the soybean crushing demand is going to accelerate quicker than we're going to lose ethanol demand.

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And therefore, you know, the fight for acres could be with us here for a number of years.

Kent Beetle from CHC, thanks for joining us.

THANKS, JEFF.

THE NATIONAL CORN GROWERS ASSOCIATION APPLAUDS THE RECENT SENATE INTRODUCTION OF THE NEXT GENERATION FUELS ACT.

THE BILL WOULD ESTABLISH A CLEAN STANDARD FOR GASOLINE AND HELP LOWER GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS, ALLOWING AUTOMAKERS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE VEHICLE FUEL EFFICIENCY.

Kathy Bergren: For corn growers, you know, we really see the Next Generation Fuels Act as a way to update fuel and vehicle policy and to take greater advantages of the benefits that ethanol has to offer in terms of helping to clean up transportation, to lower prices and to really give consumers more choices that are cleaner and affordable.

WITH INFLATION ON THE RISE, GAS PRICES HAVE CONTINUED TO SURGE. NCGA HAS BEEN REMINDING POLICY MAKERS THAT ETHANOL IS A PRICE SAVVY ALTERNATIVE.

Ethanol, you know by itself priced as much as a dollar less per gallon than unblended gasolines.

THE NEXT GENERATION FUELS ACT HAS BEEN A BI-PARTISAN EFFORT

THE UPPER MIDWEST IS A KEY PLAYER IN THE INTERNATIONAL SOY SCENE.

DELEGATES FROM ASIA, CENTRAL AMERICA AND SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES GATHERED AT THE NORTHERN CROPS INSTITUTE TO BECOME MORE FAMILIAR WITH THE REGION'S SOY INDUSTRY.

Linda Funk: IT'S GREAT TO KNOW THAT NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL REALLY WORKS WITH WISHH AND WORKS WITH NCI HERE AND REALLY SAYING, YOU KNOW, HOW DOES THEIR SOYBEAN WORK AROUND THE WORLD. SO, A HUGE PART, THEY PLAY A HUGE PART.

THE DELEGATES LEARNED ABOUT NEW IDEAS FOR SOY-BASED FOODS AND SNACKS, AS WELL AS SOY AS A SUPPLEMENT FOR FORTIFYING FOODS AND ANIMAL NUTRITION.

Linda Funk: WE'RE GETTING SUCH A GREAT GROUP OF PEOPLE HERE THAT NEED TO FEED THEIR POPULATIONS AND WE'RE HOPING THAT THEY REALLY SEE THAT SOY PROTEIN IS THE WAY TO DO THAT

THOSE WHO ATTENDED TOURED BOTH MINNESOTA AND THE DAKOTAS WHILE LEARNING ABOUT THE REGION'S SOY INDUSTRY.

Katie Pinke: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TAKE YOU TO VERGAS, MINNESOTA, WHERE A FARM FAMILY HAS OPENED A GROCERY STORE.

DUANE AND JENNIFER DITTERICH STARTED FARMING HIS FAMILY'S LAND IN WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA IN 2007. IN 2013, WITH ROW CROP PRICES DECLINING, THEY TRANSITIONED TO BEEF. A FEW YEARS LATER THEY OPENED A SMALL MEAT STORE ON THEIR FARM, AND NOW THEY'RE TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL.. THEY'VE OPENED A GROCERY STORE. KATIE PINKE HAS MORE.

DuWayne Ditterich:YOU'RE GOING TO SEE SOMEONE FROM OUR FAMILY WILL BE HERE EVERY DAY, AND WE'LL GET TO KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU WANT.

DUWAYNE, HIS WIFE AND SONS HAVE TAKEN A BIG STEP: OPENING A GROCERY STORE IN VERGAS, MINNESOTA. THE SMALL LAKES-COUNTRY TOWN OF 300, HAD BEEN LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO OPEN A GROCERY STORE SINCE THE TOWN'S ONLY ONE CLOSED IN 2016.

Very excited...

SO LAST YEAR DITTERICH DECIDED TO DO IT, INCORPORATING SOME OF THE OTHER ASPECTS OF HIS BUSINESS.

DuWayne Ditterich: I DECIDED THAT IF SOMEBODY WOULD BUY THE BUILDING AND LEASE ME SPACE THAT WE WOULD PUT UP THE GROCERY STORE, AND THEN WE'LL MOVE OUR MEAT INTO THE STORE AND OUR FOOD TRUCK THAT WE HAVE. SO NOW WE CAN DO THE CATERING OUT OF A FULL COMMERCIAL SIZE KITCHEN. SO WE CAN ACTUALLY SELL FRESH MEAT ALSO.

It's $12.21..

LOSING THE GROCERY STORE WAS A BIG BLOW FOR THE TOWN, SO MAYOR JULIE BRUHN IS HAPPY TO SEE THIS HAPPENING..

Julie Bruhn: IT WAS A REAL HEARTBREAK FOR THE COMMUNITY. A GROCERY STORE IS SO CENTRAL TO A COMMUNITY.

THE PROJECT WAS HELPED WITH COVID MONEY FROM THE WEST CENTRAL INITIATIVE AS WELL AS THEIR LOCAL BANK AND OTHER INVESTORS. THE BUILDING ALSO HAS OTHER SHOPS, A GYM, AND APARTMENTS.

Sherri Hanson: WE NEED TO USE OUR LOCAL PEOPLE, WE NEED TO SHOP AT OUR LOCAL STORES, OTHERWISE IT'S NOT GOING TO BE THERE WHEN YOU WANT IT, AND THE ONLY WAY TO DO THAT IS INVEST IN IT.

DITTERICH THINKS THIS SMALL, FAMILY-OWNED STORE CAN COMPETE WITH THE LARGER STORES IN NEARBY TOWNS, BY OFFERING QUALITY, LOCAL PRODUCTS. DITTERICH SAYS HE'S A RISK TAKER, AND HE URGES OTHER FARMERS NOT TO BE AFRAID TO TAKE A CHANCE.

DuWayne Ditterich: PUT YOUR HEART AND SOUL INTO IT, DO A GREAT JOB WITH IT, GIVE THEM A GOOD PRODUCT AT A FAIR PRICE, AND YOU'RE GOING TO SUCCEED.

IN VERGAS, MINNESOTA,THIS IS KATIE PINKE FOR AGWEEK.

BECAUSE DITTERICH IS BUSY WITH THE STORE NOW, HIS BEEF PRODUCTION ON THE FARM HAS CHANGED. HE SOLD HIS COW-CALF OPERATION TO A FRIEND, BUT IS STILL FEEDING BEEF.

WHEN THINKING OF LIVESTOCK IN THE UPPER MIDWEST, CHANCES ARE GOATS AREN'T THE FIRST SPECIES THAT COME TO MIND. LIVING IN THIS REGION CAN MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO GET QUALITY GOAT GENETICS. BUT THAT DIDN'T STOP LEVOS FARMS FROM OFFERING PREMIUM GENETICS TO THE REGION'S GOAT INDUSTRY.

Brett: It's gone from 15 does and a buck, to we have about 100 goats here now.

*goat noises*

BRETT LEVOS DECIDED HE WANTED TO RAISE HIGH QUALITY GOATS WITH PREMIUM GENETICS, BY INCORPORATING AN INTENSIVE EMBRYO TRANSFER PROGRAM, USING BOTH IVF AND FLUSHING. THIS ALLOWED HIM TO BRING HIGH QUALITY GENETICS INTO HIS HERD DESPITE HIS LOCATION.

Brett: We're in North Dakota, we're a long way from where all the major guys are, you know, Oklahoma, Texas, Illinois It's a long drive to get to some of these guys and so they're not always willing to, you know, lease bucks that far away.

HE NOW HAS MORE THAN 55 DONOR DOES, 60 RECIPIENT DOES, AS WELL AS SOME BUCKS. BUT IT DIDN'T START OUT THAT WAY.

Brett:I looked at my dad one day and said you know, 'we're going out and buying these, do you care if I raise a couple?' At that time my sister was showing and I was like, 'we can raise them and, let's see what we can do, let's have a little fun.'

LEVOS FOUND HIS PASSION FOR GOATS DURING HIS TIME IN 4-H, HE NOW SELLS TO LOCAL 4-H KIDS. HE ALSO CONSIGNS HIS SHOW WETHERS IN SALES AROUND THE COUNTRY. LEVOS BELIEVE GOATS HAVE ALLOWED HIM TO MAKE THE MOST OF HIS LAND.

Brett: We live here in the Red River Valley and everybody knows about the farm ground, but there's not a lot of grass. So we run the goats right here in the yard,

*goat noises*

...make a little hay here and there. But, you know, they have such a small footprint, as far as what we need for acreage. We can run a lot of them in just a little spot.

LEVOS RECENTLY WON GRAND CHAMPION COMMERCIAL DOE AND THE 2022 SUMMER SPOTLIGHT IN HURON, SOUTH DAKOTA.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, IMPROVING YOUR CROPS WITH CALCINE...

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

SOIL HEALTH IS CRUCIAL FOR A DESIRABLE CROP. MANY FARMERS AND PRODUCERS ARE CONSTANTLY LOOKING FOR PRODUCTS THAT HELP THEIR SOIL AND YIELD GO THE EXTRA MILE, AND A PRODUCT CALLED CALCINE DOES JUST THAT. I VISITED WITH A FARMER IN DAVENPORT NORTH DAKOTA WHO USES CALCINE ON HIS FIELDS.

Today with Brad Kellerman, who farms in Davenport, North Dakota. And we are going to be talking about Calcine. So how has Calcine transformed your soils?

Brad Kellerman: The way I've used it so far has been an in furrow application with the planter to try and help drive some oxygen into the furrow for better and more even germination. We apply it with the planter for our starter fertilizer and it's just one pint per acre. So it mixes well. So it's no extra work to apply or no special trip.

And what year did you start using calcine?

Brad Kellerman: I've only used it in furrow on soybeans. This is actually my second year and I believe it's the third on corn. And I haven't done the broadcast application yet, but I hope to get that applied this fall.

And as you've been doing it for the past couple of years, have you been happy with the results in the yield?

Brad Kellerman: Yeah, I definitely feel that it's a valuable part of the program. I've tried a lot of different products. I really like the properties that it displays. And I'm going to keep working with it to try and improve the overall soil health. Because if the soil health is not good, I don't think the crop is going to be good either.

And if you were talking to a producer that's kind of thinking about implementing Calcine into their management plan, what would you say to them?

Brad Kellerman: Well, I guess I would have to recommend that you definitely have to try some part of the information that I got from the actual the guy that makes the product that designed it, designed it to extract minerals and soil properties, much like a plant excretes enzymes and stuff to get minerals out of the soil. I've never really run across anything that's kind of displays those properties and that's a keen interest for me to try and replicate that.So I don't believe there's anything on the market that I've seen like Calcine that works in the soil the way it does.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW CALCINE WORKS, CONTACT JIM ERICKSON AT E.C.O. AT THE NUMBER OR EMAIL ON YOUR SCREEN.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL VISIT A FARM USING THEIR GRAIN IN THEIR OWN DISTILLERY

WISCONSIN MAY BE KNOWN AS THE DAIRY STATE, BUT ONE FARM IS GROWING ITS OWN SPIRITS.

THE PERLICK FAMILY HAS BEEN FARMING NEAR SARONA, WISCONSIN SINCE THE 1920S. THE FARM IS 2,000 ACRES OF CORN, WHEAT, SOYBEANS BARLEY, SUNFLOWERS AND OTHER CROPS. THEY OPENED THE DISTILLERY IN 2014, TO ADD VALUE TO THE GRAINS THEY GROW, AND TO CREATE QUALITY DISTILLED SPIRITS. THEY CURRENTLY MAKE THEIR FLAGSHIP SPIRIT, AMERICAN YEOMAN VODKA, AND WILL BE RELEASING AN AMERICAN SINGLE MALT WHISKEY NEXT SUMMER. THE PERLICKS GROW EVERYTHING THAT GOES INTO THEIR PRODUCTS.

Scott Perlick: WE CONTROL THE PROCESS FROM THE VERY START WHEN IT GOES IN THE GROUND TO THE VERY END WHEN WE SELL IT. SO THAT'S UNIQUE. YEAH, EVERYTHING THAT GOES INTO IT THE WATER'S RIGHT FROM OUR WELL.

THE DISTILLERY IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC YEAR-ROUND. THEY SELL THEIR SPIRITS ON SITE, AND IN STORES AROUND THAT REGION. THEY ALSO DO A TWENTY-ACRE SUNFLOWER MAZE IN THE FALL, AND THEY MAKE BIRDSEED WITH THE SUNFLOWERS.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK...

A Princeton dairy farmer is named Farmfest's Woman Farmer of the Year.

And The Summit Carbon pipeline faces additional hurdles.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS. HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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