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AgweekTV Full Show: 2022 Big Iron Farm Show, farmland values, Zach Ducheneaux, Nick Hagen

This week on AgweekTV, we're at the Big Iron Farm Show in West Fargo, North Dakota. We'll get you caught up on all the happenings with our team of reporters. The market for farmland is as hot as it's ever been. We talked to the FSA administrator, and he wants your input on how to improve farm programs and services. And we'll meet the farmer behind Molly Yeh's "Girl Meets Farm."

We are part of The Trust Project.

This week on AgweekTV, we're at the Big Iron Farm Show in West Fargo, North Dakota. We'll get you caught up on all the happenings with our team of reporters. The market for farmland is as hot as it's ever been. We talked to the FSA administrator, and he wants your input on how to improve farm programs and services. And we'll meet the farmer behind Molly Yeh's "Girl Meets Farm."

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M EMILY BEAL.

WE'RE COMING TO YOU THIS WEEK FROM THE BIG IRON FARM SHOW IN WEST FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA.

BIG IRON ATTRACTS MORE THAN 60,000 PEOPLE EACH YEAR TO SEE DEMONSTRATIONS OF NEW EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY, VISIT EXHIBITOR BOOTHS, CONNECT WITH PEERS AND ATTEND TRAINING SESSIONS.

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THE VALUE OF FARMLAND IS ALWAYS OF MAJOR INTEREST TO FARMERS, AND RIGHT NOW, VALUES ARE SKYROCKETING. THAT WAS THE SUBJECT OF A POPULAR SEMINAR HERE AT BIG IRON. JEFF BEACH WAS THERE, AND JOINS US NOW WITH MORE

WHEN PREMIUM FARMLAND IS UP FOR SALE, THE VALUES CAN BE ASTRONOMICAL, AND THE EXPERTS SAY THE MARKET ISN'T SLOWING DOWN.

DALE WESTON, A REAL ESTATE APPRAISER WITH FARMERS NATIONAL COMPANY, MOST SELLERS SEEM TO BE FAMILIES WHO HAVE INHERITED LAND AND DON'T WANT TO FARM IT, AND SELLING IS A GREATER RETURN THAN CURRENT RENTAL RATES. HE ENCOURAGES BUYERS, EVEN THOUGH PRICES SEEM HIGH.

DALE WESTON: WHEN AN OPPORTUNITY COMES AND IT'S NEAR YOUR OPERATION, I THINK YOU HAVE TO SEIZE UPON THAT BECAUSE SOMETIMES THESE PARCELS OF LAND WON'T TRANSFER FOR DECADES AND DECADES.

WESTON SAYS THERE'S NO INDICATION THE MARKET HAS HIT A PLATEAU-- AS LONG AS COMMODITY PRICES STAY STRONG AND INTEREST RATES RELATIVELY LOW.

A BIDDING WAR RECENTLY DROVE A PARCEL IN WEST-CENTRAL MINNESOTA TO OVER TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS AN ACRE, ABOUT THIRTY PERCENT MORE THAN EXPECTATIONS.

ANOTHER MARQUEE SESSION AT BIG IRON WAS A CONVERSATION WITH FARM SERVICE AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR ZACH DUCHENEAUX. JENNY SCHLECHT SAT IN ON IT AND HAS MORE.

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DUCHENEAUX, WHO'S A FORMER RANCHER FROM SOUTH DAKOTA, HAS BEEN ON THE JOB NOW FOR A YEAR AND A HALF.

HE TALKED ABOUT THE NUMBER OF PROGRAMS THAT FSA STAFF HAS DEALT WITH IN THAT TIME, AND THE FLEXIBILITY THEY'VE FOUND TO HELP AS MANY AG PRODUCERS AS POSSIBLE.

HE WANTS PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT HE AND HIS STAFF ARE READY TO LISTEN TO ANY IDEAS TO IMPROVE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.

ZACH DUCHENEAUX: I'M REALLY PROUD OF THE WORK THAT WE'VE BEEN ABLE TO DO, BASED ON STAKEHOLDER FEEDBACK. SO WE ENCOURAGE YOU ALL TO REACH OUT. IF SOMETHING IS WORKING, LET US KNOW, IF SOMETHING ISN'T WORKING WE WANT TO KNOW THAT TOO, BECAUSE IT MIGHT BE AN UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE THAT WE CAN ADDRESS.

ON YOUR SCREEN WE HAVE WAYS TO CONTACT DUCHENEAUX DIRECTLY IF YOU HAVE FEEDBACK.

HE TALKED A LOT ABOUT THE EMERGENCY RELIEF PROGRAM AT THE SESSION. A SECOND PHASE WILL BE UNVEILED SOON.

MANY VENDORS SHOWCASE THEIR NEW EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY AT BIG IRON. I TRAVELED AROUND THE GROUNDS TO SEE WHAT EXCITING NEWS THEY HAD TO SHARE WITH ATTENDEES.

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BEN SANDER: THIS IS OUR FIRST BIG LAND VENTURE I GUESS IN THE U.S.

VADERSTAD RECENTLY DECIDED TO EXPAND ITS REACH IN NORTH AMERICA, BY BREAKING GROUND FOR A U.S. HEADQUARTERS AND TRAINING CENTER IN WAHPETON, NORTH DAKOTA.

BEN: RIGHT NEXT TO OUR EXISTING PLANT, SO THIS IS THE FIRST MAJOR INVESTMENT IN THE U.S. BY VADERSTAD SO IT'S VERY EXCITING.

VADERSTAD ALSO SHOWED OFF THEIR CARRIER XL HIGH SPEED DISC WHICH HAS BEEN AVAILABLE IN EUROPE SINCE 1999, BUT IS NOW BEING ADOPTED FOR NORTH AMERICA.

BEN: THE UNIQUE THING IS THIS HAS FIVE SECTIONS, SO IT CAN FOLLOW THE GROUND CONTOUR A LOT BETTER, AND IT ALSO HAS A FLOATING TIP SO THEN IT FOLLOWS THE HILLS AND DIPS A LOT BETTER THEN TOO. SO NO ONE ELSE OFFERS THAT COMBINATION.

HORSCH BROUGHT THEIR NEW LEEB VL SPRAYER THAT THEY UNVEILED IN LATE AUGUST.

PETER OVREBO : SO WE USE A COMPLETELY PROPRIETARY BOOM CONTROL SYSTEM, DEVELOPED AND DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS SPRAYER. ALONG WITH THE GEOMETRY OF THE BOOM, AND SOME ADDITIONAL COMPONENTS LIKE A GYROSCOPIC SENSOR AND ANGLE SENSORS, WE'RE ABLE TO KEEP A VERY LEVEL BOOM THAT'S STABLE.

CHAD KYLLO IS THE OWNER OF ADVANCED GRAIN HANDLING. HE SAYS NOW, NOT NEXT SPRING, IS THE TIME TO START PREPARING IF YOU HAVE BIN OR EQUIPMENT NEEDS.

CHAD: BECAUSE THE GUYS THAT START PLANNING NOW, WE GET OUT AND WE DO A DESIGN BUILD, WE GO OUT TO YOUR PLACE. WE GET AHEAD OF THE GAME, GET EQUIPMENT ORDERED, AND A LOT OF TIME, LIKE WE'VE ALREADY SOLD QUITE A FEW PROJECTS THAT WE'RE POURING CEMENT FOR NEXT YEAR, AND WE'RE GOING TO BE AHEAD OF THE GAME ON THAT, YOU DON'T HAVE TO DEAL WITH SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUES AND ALL THAT. YOU START WAITING LIKE WE USED TO BE ABLE TO, TIL THE LATE WINTER AND THAT, THAT'S WHEN YOU'RE GOING TO RUN INTO PROBLEMS. SO IT'S ALWAYS GOOD TO PLAN EARLY.

THERE ARE MORE THAN 3-HUNDRED VENDORS HERE AT THE BIG IRON FARM SHOW.

THIS WEEK OUR AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN CROP TOUR TAKES US TO SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA.

WE VISIT A SOYBEAN FIELD WHERE U OF M EXTENSION CROPS EDUCATOR RYAN MILLER IS RUNNING A RESEARCH PLOT.

RYAN MILLER: BEHIND ME RIGHT NOW IS A COVER CROP PROJECT. THERE'S TWO DIFFERENT PLANTING DATES OF SOYBEANS HERE.

MILLER SAYS IN GENERAL, SOYBEANS IN THIS PART OF THE STATE ARE LOOKING GOOD.

RYAN MILLER: SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA, AGAIN THIS YEAR WE ENDED UP LUCKING OUT AND BEING KIND OF THE GARDEN SPOT AS PEOPLE CALL IT.

LIKE MANY AREAS, PLANTING GOT OFF TO A SLIGHTLY LATE START, AROUND MAY FIFTH. BUT MILLER SAYS THEY'VE BEEN ABLE TO CATCH UP, WITH GOOD GROWING CONDITIONS. MILLER SAYS THEY COULD SEE YIELDS OF UP TO EIGHTY BUSHELS AN ACRE.

RYAN MILLER: SO, ASIDE FROM THAT KIND OF DELAY AT THE START OF THE PLANTING SEASON, REALLY WE'VE HAD PRETTY EXCELLENT GROWING CONDITIONS. SO PRETTY MUCH NORMAL WHEN WE LOOK AT TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION PATTERNS.

BUT MILLER SAYS THEY ARE SEEING SOME APHIDS, AND DISEASES AROUND THE REGION.

RYAN MILLER: THERE WERE SOME ISSUES WITH SOME PHYTOPHTHORA. NOTHING TERRIBLE, BUT CERTAINLY THAT DISEASE IS PRESENT. WE HAD SOME SPORADIC WHITE MOLD, A LITTLE BIT OF SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME.

MILLER SAYS NOW, THEY NEED MORE WARM, DRY WEATHER TO GET READY FOR HARVEST.

THE CROP YOU CAN SEE IS STARTING TO REALLY ENTER THAT MATURE PHASE, AND SO IT WON'T BE TOO MUCH LONGER AND WE'LL BE HARVESTING SOYBEANS.

MILLER SAYS HE EXPECT SOYBEAN HARVEST TO START IN HIS REGION IN EARLY OCTOBER.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN IN AG IN THE COMING YEARS? A CONFERENCE CALLED "THE NEXT FIVE YEARS" FOCUSED ON MAJOR SHIFTS IN THE AG MARKETPLACE.

ONE OF THE SPEAKERS, NELSON NEALE OF CHS, SAYS HE SEES SIMILARITIES BETWEEN THE CURRENT AG ECONOMY, AND TRENDS THAT PREDATED THE 1980S FARM CRISIS. HE CITES INCREASED FOOD AND ENERGY PRICES, RISING INTEREST RATES AND INSTABILITY IN GLOBAL POLITICS. BUT HE SAYS HE'S STILL OPTIMISTIC ABOUT AG.

NELSON NEALE: WITH CHANGE COMES OPPORTUNITY. YOU KNOW, WHETHER IT'S DEVELOPING NEW MARKETS FOR SOYBEAN MEAL, OR NEW SOURCES OF DEMAND FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS, YOU KNOW, I THINK THERE'S A LOT OF EXCITING CHANGES HAPPENING IN AGRICULTURE AND IT'S UP TO THE INDUSTRY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE AND CAPITALIZE ON SOME OF THOSE OPPORTUNITIES THAT ARE BEING PRESENTED.

THE CONFERENCE WAS HOSTED BY THE NORTHERN CROPS INSTITUTE.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL MEET THE MAN WHO BROUGHT CELEBRITY CHEF MOLLY YEH FROM NEW YORK TO A MINNESOTA FARM.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: CRARY AND FULL POD 2022, FARMERS MUTUAL OF NEBRASKA, NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL, NORTH DAKOTA CORN COUNCIL, MINNESOTA SOYBEAN, AND GERINGHOFF

WELCOME BACK TO OUR SHOW FROM BIG IRON IN WEST FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA.

MOLLY YEH HAS BECOME A LOCAL STAR ON THE NATIONAL FOOD SCENE. SHE IS A COOKBOOK AUTHOR, AND HAS A SHOW ON THE FOOD NETWORK CALLED "GIRL MEETS FARM". BUT HOW DID SHE END UP ON THIS FARM, RIGHT OUTSIDE OF EAST GRAND FORKS, MINNESOTA? IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, WE MEET MOLLY'S HUSBAND, NICK HAGEN, THE MAN BEHIND THE FARM.

NICK HAGEN: I LOVE FARMING, I LOVE THIS PLACE.

NICK HAGEN IS THE FIFTH GENERATION TO FARM THIS LAND. BUT HE DIDN'T ALWAYS PLAN TO DO THAT. AFTER GRADUATING FROM EAST GRAND FORKS HIGH SCHOOL IN 2005, HE ATTENDED THE PRESTIGIOUS JUILLIARD SCHOOL IN NEW YORK CITY, HOPING FOR A CAREER IN MUSIC.

NICK HAGEN: IN HINDSIGHT IT SEEMS LIKE KIND OF A CRAZY, YOU KNOW, FARFETCHED GOAL, BUT AT THE TIME I REALLY HAD NO PERSPECTIVE, I JUST THOUGHT THAT'S WHERE YOU GO.

AT JULLIARD, HE MET AN UNDERCLASSMAN NAMED MOLLY YEH. AFTER A COUPLE OF YEARS TOGETHER IN NEW YORK, THEY DECIDED TO MOVE BACK TO NICK'S HOMETOWN, AND FARM. THEY MADE THE MOVE IN THE SUMMER OF 2013, JUST IN TIME FOR BEET HARVEST..

NICK HAGEN: SHE MOVED TO THIS NEW PLACE, DIDN'T KNOW ANYBODY, AN ALL OF A SUDDEN I'M GONE ALL DAY LONG. IT WAS SORT OF LIKE TRIAL BY FIRE.

NICK AND MOLLY WERE MARRIED RIGHT HERE ON THE FARM IN 2015, WITH A DANCE IN HIS SHOP.

NICK HAGEN: IT WAS REALLY SPECIAL FOR ME THAT MOLLY WOULD WANT TO BE MARRIED ON THIS FARM AND LIKE, MAKE HER LIFE HERE.

ALTHOUGH NICK DIDN'T PURSUE A CAREER IN MUSIC, HE FINDS CREATIVE FULFILLMENT ON THE FARM

NICK HAGEN: THERE'S THE CHALLENGE OF ALWAYS SEEING SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY, AND THEN JUST USING THAT CREATIVITY TO FIND A SOLUTION.

NICK AND MOLLY HAVE TWO YOUNG DAUGHTERS, AND ALTHOUGH THEY HAVE SEPARATE CAREERS, THEY ARE DEEPLY INVOLVED IN EACH OTHER'S INTERESTS.

I MEAN, WHAT BETTER JOB CAN YOU BE THAN CHIEF TASTE TESTER?

AND NOW THEY'RE OPENING A RESTAURANT. IT'S THEIR FIRST JOINT VENTURE, AND WILL FEATURE REGIONAL CUISINE, LIKE HOT DISH AND COOKIE SALAD, MADE WITH LOCAL INGREDIENTS.

NICK HAGEN: YOU KNOW, EVERYTHING'S FROM SCRATCH, I GUESS WE'RE TRYING TO ELEVATE IT IN A SENSE, BUT WE'RE ALSO TRYING TO MAKE IT VERY APPROACHABLE. A PLACE THAT REALLY CELEBRATES THIS PLACE.

YOU CAN READ MUCH MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

JOINING ME TODAY IS MATT FAUL FROM RED E. SO, MATT, TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOUR COMPANY.

MATT: YEAH. READ E EXISTS TO REALLY HELP FARMERS KEEP ON FARMING. WE STARTED OUT AS AN ENGINEERING COMPANY ABOUT TEN YEARS AGO AND SINCE THEN WE'VE ALWAYS BEEN BEHIND THE SCENES EARLY ON, DEVELOPING SOLUTIONS FOR AG EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT AND EVEN MEDICAL. AND BUT IT'S BEEN IN THE LAST FEW YEARS THAT WE'VE REALLY COME ON STRONG WITH HELPING FARMERS WITH THEIR AIR SEEDERS AND OTHER THINGS RELATED.

EMILY: AND YOU GUYS ARE CELEBRATING YOUR TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR.

MATT: WE'VE BEEN AT THIS FOR TEN YEARS, AND IT REALLY SHOWS THAT WE'VE GOT A GOOD TRACK RECORD OF OF PROVIDING THESE SOLUTIONS THAT HELP FARMERS OUT. AND WE'RE NOT GOING ANYWHERE SOON.

EMILY: WHAT SPECIFICALLY DO YOU SELL WITH THESE AIR SEEDERS?

MATT: YEAH. SO WE SELL THE SOLUTIONS THAT HELP FARMERS WITH THEIR SEEDERS, FIX THEM UP AND MAKE SURE THEY'RE RUNNING AT OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE SO THEY DON'T HAVE YIELD ROBBING ISSUES. WE'VE GOT ROW UNIT FIXES, ALL THE WARE ITEMS LIKE BOOTS DISCS, SEED TABS, CLOSING WHEELS, AND WE'VE GOT SPRINGS PRETTY MUCH IF THERE'S SOMETHING THAT NEEDS TO BE REPLACED ON IT OR THAT ISN'T PERFORMING WELL, WE PROVIDE US A BETTER SOLUTION FOR IT.

THEN THERE'S THE AIR CART. SO MOST FARMERS HAVE AIR CARTS. WITH THESE NO TILL DRILLS, WE PROVIDE SOLUTIONS FOR THE TROUBLESOME CORROSION THAT'S ON THESE SYSTEMS. SO THEY THEY TYPICALLY COME OUT OF THE FACTORY WITH WITH STEEL, WITH ALUMINUM AND THOSE THINGS, THOSE MATERIALS JUST DO NOT WORK WELL WITH CRUDE, WITH FERTILIZER. AND SO WE NEED TO COME UP WITH A BETTER SOLUTION.

SO WHAT WE'VE DONE IS WE'VE PUT TOGETHER STAINLESS SOLUTIONS THAT MAKE THOSE CARTS WORK ACTUALLY BETTER THAN NEW, AS GOOD AS NEW OR BETTER THAN NEW. AND THERE'S NO TROUBLE ANYMORE. NO MORE STUCK, HALF WITH DISCONNECTS, NO MORE FLOW ISSUES, NO MORE HOLES THAT ARE CAUSING LEAKS.ALSO INTELLIGENT AG WIRELESS BLOCKAGE SYSTEMS, MAKING SURE THAT WE ALWAYS KNOW THAT PRODUCT IS GETTING TO THE GROUND SO THAT THAT SEED, THAT FERTILIZER IS IN THE GROUND SO THAT THE CROPS CAN GROW THE WAY IT'S SUPPOSED TO.

THANKS FOR JOINING US, MATT, AND BEST OF LUCK IN THE NEXT TEN YEARS. MATT FAUL, RED E.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TELL YOU HOW TEACHERS CAN GET MONEY TO HELP STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT ONE OF THE REGION'S BIGGEST CROPS.

IS THE UPCOMING WEATHER STILL LOOKING FAVORABLE FOR MORE QUALITY GROWING DAYS?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL IS GIVING TEACHERS THE CHANCE TO RECEIVE GRANTS OF UP TO $500, FOR LESSONS ABOUT SOYBEANS. WE LOOK AT HOW THE PROGRAM WORKS, IN THIS MONTH'S SOY INSIGHT.

SO IN THIS PART OF YOUR BOOK YOU'RE GOING TO WRITE WORDS TO LIVE BY.

DEB HATLEWICK IS AN AG TEACHER IN RURAL NORTH DAKOTA, IN AN AREA SURROUNDED BY SOYBEAN FIELDS. BUT SHE SAYS MANY OF HER STUDENTS DON'T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM. SHE SAYS A GRANT FROM THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL WILL HELP CHANGE THAT.

DEB HATLEWICK: WE HAVE SOME FIELDS CLOSE BY HERE THAT I MIGHT JUST TAKE THE CLASS OUT FOR A DAY ON THE BUS AND HAVE THEM ACTUALLY LOOK, AND SEE WHAT THE HARVEST LOOKS LIKE, SEE WHAT THAT SEED LOOKS LIKE.

THE GRANTS ARE TO BE USED TO SUPPORT LESSONS RELATED TO SOYBEANS OR SOY PRODUCTS IN GRADES SIX THROUGH TWELVE. HATLEWICK PLANS TO USE THE GRANT FOR A SOYBEAN NUTRITION PROGRAM.

DEB HATLEWICK: SO WE WOULD USE SOYBEAN PRODUCTS TO MAKE ICE CREAM, TO MAKE, YOU KNOW, DIFFERENT TYPES OF THINGS USING SOY MILK SO IN THAT PROCESS THERE'S CERTAIN EQUIPMENT YOU NEED.

STEPHANIE SINNER, THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL, SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT FOR STUDENTS TO LEARN ABOUT ONE OF NORTH DAKOTA'S MAJOR CROPS.

STEPHANIE SINNER: YOU KNOW, WE USED TO THINK THAT STUDENTS THAT GREW UP IN MAYBE RURAL NORTH DAKOTA, WENT TO A SMALL SCHOOL IN A SMALLER TOWN IN THE COUNTRYSIDE WERE MORE CONNECTED TO AGRICULTURE, BUT THAT'S NOT NECESSARILY THE CASE. THEY'RE DRIVING BY FIELDS AND ACRES OF CROPS AND MAYBE WONDERING GOSH WHAT IS THAT ALL ABOUT? THEY'RE REALLY CONNECTING THEIR SURROUNDINGS AND THEIR COMMUNITIES AND THE ECONOMY TO THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE AND OUR FARMERS.

HATLEWICK SAYS SHE APPRECIATES THE SOYBEAN COUNCIL'S HELP.

DEB HATLEWICK: I THINK A LOT OF THEM REALIZE THE STRUGGLES THAT WE HAVE AS TEACHERS TO GET FUNDING, AND MAKE SURE THAT WE HAVE THE PROPER EDUCATION FOR THE KIDS, ESPECIALLY IN THOSE CROPS THAT ARE NEAR AND DEAR TO OUR HEARTS.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT APPLYING FOR A GRANT, GO TO ND SOYBEAN.ORG , OR CALL THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL AT THE NUMBER ON YOUR SCREEN.

STILL AHEAD FROM BIG IRON WE'LL SHOW YOU THE LATEST HIGH TECH TOOL FOR FIGHTING WEEDS

PEOPLE AT BIG IRON ARE GETTING A LOOK AT WHAT MAY BE THE FUTURE OF WEED CONTROL. MIKKEL PATES JOINS US NOW WITH A LOOK AT THE "WEED BOT".

NDSU RESEARCHERS HAVE DEVELOPED AN EXPERIMENTAL REMOTE-CONTROLLED MACHINE THAT USES CAMERAS TO FIND AND KILL WEEDS IN THE FIELD.

THE GOAL IS THE WHEELED MACHINE WILL USE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TO SPRAY INDIVIDUAL WEEDS IN FIELDS. - - IT'S SIX FEET TALL AND SIX FEET WIDE, AND DRIVEN BY BATTERIES AND AN ELECTRIC MOTOR. FOR NOW, THE PROJECT IS FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATION, BUT ULTIMATELY, THE GOAL WILL BE TO USE THIS TECHNOLOGY TO HELP FARMERS CONTROL THEIR WEEDS MORE EFFICIENTLY.

XIN "REX" SUN: ONE BENEFIT FOR THE FARMERS, COST. TWO, BENEFIT FOR THE CONSUMERS, THREE IS BENEFIT FOR THE ENVIRONMENT. SO WE WANT PRECISION AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGIES TO DO THAT, TO HELP THE COMMUNITIES AROUND US.

THIS IS THE SECOND OF FOUR VERSIONS OF THE WEED BOT SINCE THIS PROJECT STARTED IN 2018.

FUTURE VERSIONS OF THIS VEHICLE COULD ALSO POTENTIALLY INCLUDE THE COLLECTION OF SOIL SAMPLES OR EVEN A SMART WEATHER STATION.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK

AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR HAS ENDED A CONTRACT TO SEND SUGARBEET BYPRODUCTS TO A GRAND FORKS BIOREFINERY.

AND SUNFLOWERS AREN'T JUST A POPULAR COMMODITY; NOW THEY'RE A POPULAR TOURIST ATTRACTION, TOO.

WE APPRECIATE YOU WATCHING AGWEEK TV FROM THE BIG IRON FARM SHOW THIS WEEK.

REMEMBER TO CHECK US OUT DAILY ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM AND TIK TOK TO KEEP UP ON ALL YOUR AG NEWS.

HAVE A GREAT WEEK.

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