Coming up on AgweekTV, we'll talk about the President issuing an executive order to restore competition to agriculture. We will visit a west central Minnesota family carrying on their crop spraying business. We'll tell you about a program designed to help make modern-day homesteaders feel welcome in North Dakota. Finally, we will see farmers learn about weed technology from U of M herbicide trials.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV...THE PRESIDENT ISSUES AN EXECUTIVE ORDER TO RESTORE COMPETITION TO AGRICULTURE. A WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA FAMILY IS CARRYING ON THEIR CROP SPRAYING BUSINESS.

Rose Dunn: WE'LL TELL YOU ABOUT A PROGRAM DESIGNED TO HELP MAKE MODERN-DAY HOMESTEADERS FEEL WELCOME IN NORTH DAKOTA.

AND FARMERS LEARN ABOUT WEED TECHNOLOGY FROM U OF M HERBICIDE TRIALS.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

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PRESIDENT BIDEN HAS ISSUED AN EXECUTIVE ORDER TO PROMOTE COMPETITION IN AGRICULTURE AND BUILD A MORE RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAIN. THE ORDER INCLUDES USDA STRENGTHENING ENFORCEMENT OF THE CENTURY OLD PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT TO HOLD MEATPACKERS ACCOUNTABLE. THE GOAL IS TO MAKE MARKETS MORE COMPETITIVE AND RESILIANT AND GIVE FARMERS AND CONSUMERS MORE CHOICES IN THE MARKET PLACE.

Well I think it's huge. You know on this 100th anniversary, 1921 to 2021, that we finally start getting some strengthening of these rules that allow everybody to compete.

USDA IS INVESTING $500 MILLION IN AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN FUNDS TO EXPAND MEAT AND POULTRY PROCESSING CAPACITY AND INCREASE COMPETITION IN THE SECTOR. PLUS, DEVELOP NEW RULES TO STRENGTHEN THE PRODUCT OF THE USA LABEL.

SOUTH DAKOTA IS ALSO AGGRESSIVELY LEADING EFFORTS TO IMPROVE AG COMPETITION AND FIGHT THE ANTI-COMPETITIVE MARKET PRACTICES OF MEAT PACKERS. THAT PLAN WAS DETAILED AT THE GOVERNOR'S AG SUMMIT IN SIOUX FALLS.

Governor Kristi Noem announced she's working with fellow Governor's and sent a letter to DOJ asking for action.

Noem: Frankly the packers are stealing from our ranchers making big profits while we're barely keeping our ranchers out on the land. So it needs to be investigated.

Noem says they're also trying to improve competition and protect food security by expanding processing.

Noem: This has never been done where the state of South Dakota's invested in processing at meat facilities to allow these guys to actually get more head through.

Ag Secretary Hunter Roberts says they've developed a grant program to expand processing capacity.

Hunter Roberts: We're rolling out $5 million to meat processing facilities across the state, I think 98 facilities are going to receive grants, 16 of those are new.

USDA and the state also have an agreement to allow selected state-inspected meat processors to ship product across state lines.

Roberts: So the cooperative interstate shipment program is great for our producers, great for our meat processing industry and we're excited about it.

Noem says she's also concerned about producers suffering from the drought.

THE STATE IS WAITING FOR EARLY RELEASE OF CRP FOR HAYING AND GRAZING BUT NOEM'S GRANTED AN EMERGENCY DECLARATION TO HAY HIGHWAY DITCHES.

WITH THAT EXECUTIVE ORDER, PRODUCERS ARE HARVESTING AS MUCH HAY AS THEY CAN IN SOUTH DAKOTA, WHILE THEY CAN.

THE DROUGHT MEANS TAKING THE DITCHES EARLIER THAN USUAL. AND WE FOUND AMANDA KLAWONN MOWING DITCHES ALONG SOUTH DAKOTA HIGHWAY 34, WEST OF WENTWORTH.

SHE AND HUSBAND, BRANT, HAVE A SMALL LIVESTOCK FARM, AND SHE WAS OUT CUTTING HAY FOR THEM. THEY PREFER SMALL, SQUARE BALES FOR EASIER HANDLING. AND SAYS THEY'RE VERY CONCERNED ABOUT HAY SUPPLIES THIS YEAR.

Amanda Klawonn: JUST WITH THE DROUGHT AND ASSUMING THAT WE'RE PROBABLY ONLY GOING TO GET ONE CUTTING OUT OF EVERYTHING. LIKE LAST YEAR I THINK WE HAD TWO CUTTINGS IN SOME SPOTS. THIS YEAR IS GOING TO BE TOUGH.

TYPICALLY, STATE RULES PREVENT MOWING STATE HIGHWAY DITCHES BEFORE JULY 10.

THE JULY WASDE REPORT WAS BULLISH FOR WHEAT, NEUTRAL TO BEARISH FOR ROW CROPS.

WHEAT PRODUCTION WAS CUT 150 MILLION BUSHELS, MOSTLY SPRING WHEAT RESULTING IN A 105 MILLION BUSHEL DROP IN NEW CROP CARRYOVER, THE LOWEST IN 8 YEARS.

CORN PRODUCTION WAS INCREASED 175 MILLION BUSHELS, WITH YIELD UNCHANGED BUT HIGHER ACREAGE. YET NEW CROP ENDING STOCKS WERE ONLY UP 75 MILLION BUSHELS. BRAZIL'S CROP WAS LOWERED 5.5 MILLION METRIC TONS.

AND USDA MADE NO CHANGES IN U.S. SOYBEAN PRODUCTION, OR ENDING STOCKS.

JOINING US WITH REPORT ANALYSIS IS TODD HULTMAN. AND THE MOST BULLISH PART OF THE REPORT WAS WHEAT PRODUCTION BEING LOWERED. AND MOST OF THAT CAME FROM A REDUCTION IN SPRING WHEAT, RIGHT?

TODD: YEAH, THE NEW ESTIMATE, 305 MILLION BUSHELS, THAT'S DOWN ABOUT 40 PERCENT FROM A YEAR AGO, SO THAT'S A BIG DROP. THAT COULD REALLY GO EVEN LOWER. THE FORECAST IS NOT LOOKING ANY BETTER AHEAD.

SO DO YOU THINK SPRING WHEAT PRICES HAVE TO GO A LOT HIGHER TO FACTOR IN THE LOWER PRODUCTION, AND WILL THAT PULL THE OTHER TWO CLASSES ALONG?

TODD: YEAH, I THINK THEY EVENTUALLY HAVE TO. OUR SPRING WHEAT SUPPLIES ARE GOING TO BE ABOUT THEIR LOWEST LEVELS SINCE 2008. SO THAT'S NOT A LOT TO WORK WITH. AND WE'RE GOING TO BE GOING THROUGH WINTER MONTHS WHERE COMMERCIALS ARE GOING TO HAVE TO BID UP TO SECURE MORE SUPPLIES.

SO IN CORN, YIELD WAS LEFT UNCHANGED, BUT BECAUSE OF BIGGER ACRES, WE SAW BIGGER PRODUCTION. BUT ENDING STOCKS WERE ONLY UP WHAT, ABOUT 75 MILLION BUSHELS?

TODD: YEAH, WE'RE AROUND 1.43 BILLION BUSHELS NOW. BUT WE HAVEN'T FACTORED IN ANY WEATHER INTO THAT YIELD ESTIMATE. IN MY MIND, THERE'S A GREATER RISK OF THAT NUMBER COMING DOWN THAN GOING HIGHER.

SO THIS MAY BE THE BIGGEST NUMBER WE SEE FOR THE YEAR?

TODD: I THINK QUITE POSSIBLE ON CORN, YEAH.

WE HAVE SOME UPSIDE IN THAT CORN MARKET THEN TOO.

TODD: IT'S STILL A VERY TIGHT SITUATION. WE CONTINUE TO SEE A VERY TIGHT SCENARIO THAT'S GOING TO CARRY THROUGH INTO THE NEW SEASON.

SOYBEAN ENDING STOCKS, YIELD PRODUCTION, USDA LEFT EVERYTHING UNCHANGED. BUT EVEN IF YOU LOOK AT THAT, IF IT DOESN'T CHANGE BY THE END OF THE YEAR, WE'RE AT PIPELINE SUPPLIES OR BELOW, RIGHT?

TODD: YEAH, AND I DON'T SEE ANYTHING TO CHANGE THAT. AND AGAIN, THE RISK IS THAT THE CROP GETS SMALLER THIS SUMMER. PROBABLY NOT MUCH BIGGER. THERE'S GOING TO BE A LOT OF COMPETITION FROM CHINA. WE'RE ALREADY SEEING SIGNS OF VERY STRONG DEMAND COMING OUT OF BRAZIL, AND THEY'RE PROBABLY NOT FAR OFF FROM TURNING TO THE U.S.

SO IF CHINA DOES COME AT THE MARKET, HOW HIGH DO PRICES HAVE TO GO HERE TO START RATIONING DEMAND?

TODD: THE WAY THINGS LOOK RIGHT NOW, ANOTHER 15 DOLLAR CASH PRICES IS NOT OUT OF THE QUESTION. OVERALL, IT'S STILL A VERY BULLISH SCENARIO.

ALLRIGHT, THANKS FOR JOINING US, DTN ANALYST, TODD HULTMAN.

FARMERS AND AG PROFESSIONALS IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA HAD THE CHANCE TO SEE SOME OF THE APPLIED RESEARCH UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA SCIENTISTS HAVE BEEN WORKING ON THIS SUMMER.

AS NOAH FISH FOUND, WEED RESISTANCE IS A BIG TOPIC.

You are the first group, as far as we can tell in Minnesota, that has gotten this!

U OF M EXTENSION SPECIALISTS SPENT THE DAY DEMONSTRATING TRIALS IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA.

There's quite a bit of data to go into it.

ONE IS A GRADUATE STUDENT PROJECT SHOWCASING COVER CROPS AND PRE-EMERGENCE HERBICIDE, AND ANOTHER TRIAL WITH HERBICIDE CONTROL FOR WEEDS. THEY'RE ALSO PUTTING TOGETHER PROTOCOLS FOR NEW CROP PROTECTION PRODUCTS THAT AREN'T ON THE MARKET YET.

Ryan Miller: WE DO GET TO EVALUATE SOME OF THE NEWER HERBICIDE PRODUCTS. MANY OF THESE AREN'T QUITE YET REGISTERED, OR THEY IN SOME CASES DON'T HAVE NAMES YET. AND SO IT GIVES US AN OPPORTUNITY TO KIND OF GET A FIRST HAND LOOK AS PROFESSIONALS AS WELL AS SHOW FOLKS, YOU KNOW WHAT THE POTENTIAL IS FOR SOME OF THESE PRODUCTS.

Runs the length of the leaf. That's Palmer Amaranth.

THEY ALSO SHOWED HOW TO IDENTIFY VARIOUS PIGWEEDS, INCLUDING WATER HEMP, PALMER AMARANTH, POWELL AMARANTH AND RED ROOT PIGWEED.

And the petiole is pretty long, so this is Palmer Amaranth.

EXTENSION WEED SCIENTIST DEBALIN SARANGI SHOWED SOME WEEDS FROM AROUND MINNESOTA THAT HAD SURVIVED MULTIPLE SPRAYINGS OF HIGH DOSES OF HERBICIDES.

Debalin Sarangi: ROUNDUP, CALISTO, ATRAZINE, FLEXTER AND RAPTOR. SO THOSE ARE FIVE HERBICIDES SPRAYED AT THREE TIMES OF THE LABEL DOSE, AND THE WATERHEMP POPULATION SURVIVED.

THE HOT AND DRY CONDITIONS IN MUCH OF THE REGION CAN MAKE WEEDS AN EVEN BIGGER PROBLEM THIS SEASON FOR SOME. IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV,

WE'LL MEET A FAMILY WHOSE BUSINESS IS FLYING HIGH IN AG AVIATION.

MORE THAN 1,000 PEOPLE ATTENDED THE ROCK NOBLES CATTLEMEN SUMMER BEEF TOUR IN SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA. IT HIGHLIGHTED EIGHT OPERATIONS GIVING PRODUCERS IDEAS THEY COULD TAKE AND USE AT HOME.

Summit Lake Livestock showed off several buildings they converted from hog facilities 15 years ago.

Penning: Some of them are wet calf barns where we bottle feed day old calves and then some of them are like the facility behind me the slat facility that we converted.

He says that produced a real cost savings.

Penning: I bet we've got 40-percent in it what we would have had if we'd of built new, probably less than that 35-percent. Couple, three hundred dollars a head space.

Brake Feedyards is a multifamily operation feeding 3,000 to 5,000 head annually.

Brake: We start all the cattle outside and then we built the slat barn back in 2012 and now we start the cattle outside and try to move as many cattle inside when they reach around 1000 pounds and then we'll finish them out around 1500 pounds in there.

He says a unique aspect of the slat barn is the manure storage..

Brake: It holds 5.2 million gallons of manure and most pits are cut up, divided between each pen well we decided with the just the cost difference of the pit we went with one big open pit.

And R&R Thier Feedlots started with 3,000 head in 2004 and has nearly tripled capacity since then.

Thier: We run a 10 to 12,000 head feedlot custom feeding, some ownership and mostly native some Holsteins.

They have concrete outdoor lots and a bedding barn, but he prefers the slat barns.

Thier: All the pens have their benefits and some disadvantages but overall I think the confinement's probably less labor intense. I mean that kind of seems like that's the way things are going to save labor.

THE CARLSON FAMILY IS CARRYING ON THE FAMILY CROP SPRAYING BUSINESS IN WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA.

MIKKEL PATES LOOKS AT THE UNIQUE CHALLENGES, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Boone Carlson: I GREW UP DOING THIS.

BOONE CARLSON GREW UP WORKING IN HIS FAMILY'S AG AVIATION BUSINESS AT WENDELL , MINNESOTA. AFTER SEVERAL YEARS WORKING IN AG RETAIL, HE CAME BACK TO A FAMILY FARMING AND CROP SPRAYING HERITAGE. THE BUSINESS HAS ADDED A WHEATON, MINNESOTA LOCATION. CROP SPRAYING HAS EVOLVED ALONG WITH AGRICULTURE. FOR ONE THING, THERE ARE FEWER SPRAY PLANES THAN IN PAST DECADES.

Boone Carlson: AND AS TIME MOVES ON THE PLANES GOT BIGGER, TURBINE ENGINES GOT PUT ON SPRAY PLANES SO THEY COULD HAUL MORE WATER, OUR BUSINESS HAS EVOLVED THE SAME AS PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE.

Dustin Mellette: FLYING IS MY LOVE.

DUSTIN MELLETTE COMES FROM WISCONSIN AS AN AG PILOT FOR THE CARLSONS. THE COMPANY'S THREE PLANES PRIMARILY WILL CARE FOR 12 TO 15 MAJOR CLIENTS, AS WILL AS OTHERS. MELLETTE SAYS DESPITE THE GENERAL LACK OF RAIN, THE CROPS HOLD PROMISE. BUT THEY'RE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR TO CONFRONT BUGS AND DISEASES, WHICH COULD CROP UP IN LATE JULY AND AUGUST.

Dustin Mellette: SOME GUYS ARE SEEING BUGS IN SOME ALFALFA, SO WE'VE BEEN TAKING CARE OF THAT. THE WHEAT IS STARTING TO COME TO MATURITY AND HEAD OUT, SO WE'RE STARTING TO SPRAY SOME FUNGICIDE ON WHEAT LOCALLY. DOING A LITTLE EARLY FUNGICIDE ON CORN FOR THE PROTECTION BECAUSE OF THE HEAT THAT WE'VE HAD.

TOWARD THE END OF THE SEASON, THEY'LL SEED COVER CROPS FROM THE AIR. CHARITY CARLSON MANAGES THE OFFICE WITH HER HUSBAND. SHE SAYS EACH YEAR HAS ITS UNCERTAINTIES, MAINLY DEPENDING ON WEATHER AND CROP PRICES.

Charity Carlson: EVERY YEAR IS STRESSFUL, BUT GENERALLY IT SEEMS TO WORK OUT IN THE END.

THE CARLSONS SAY THEY LOVE WHAT THEY DO, AND HOPE TO PASS IT TO THE NEXT GENERATION. IN WENDELL, MINNESOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

Rose Dunn: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TELL YOU HOW BEING A MODERN-DAY HOMESTEADER OFFERS LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES IN NORTH DAKOTA.

MORE AREAS IN THE REGION RECEIVED RAIN THIS WEEK, WHICH WILL BE NEEDED BEFORE RETURNING TO HOT AND DRY.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

OVER THE NEXT FEW MONTHS, WE'LL MEET SOME PEOPLE WHO HAVE COME FROM FAR AND WIDE FOR THE OPPORTUNITIES OUR RURAL COMMUNITIES HAVE TO OFFER, AND NOW CALL NORTH DAKOTA HOME.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN TALKS TO ONE OF THE NEWCOMERS WHO HELP STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA.

Come on cows!

LIKE A MODERN DAY PIONEER, SANDY RIEKER PACKED UP HER FAMILY AND MOVED TO THE COUNTRY TO START A NEW LIFE...

My whole life I've wanted a farm.

BUT UNLIKE THE EARLY SETTLERS, INSTEAD OF HEADING EAST, THEY WENT NORTH, LEAVING HER NATIVE COLORADO AND LANDING NEAR WATFORD CITY, NORTH DAKOTA TEN YEARS AGO. THE HEART OF OIL COUNTRY, IN THE HEART OF THE OIL BOOM. ALTHOUGH THE MONEY WAS GOOD, LIFE WAS TOUGH. THE WORK WAS HARD AND THEY LIVED IN A TRAILER FOR A YEAR AND A HALF.

Sandy Rieker: I THOUGHT SO MUCH ABOUT THE PIONEER WOMEN, AND YOU KNOW ABOUT HOW HARDY, HOW STURDY THEY HAD TO HAVE BEEN TO ENDURE.

BUT THEY FELL IN LOVE WITH THE PLACE, AND ESPECIALLY THE PEOPLE, AND FOUND THEIR FIVE ACRE PIECE OF PARADISE

Sandy Rieker: THE PEOPLE THAT TOOK ME IN WERE SO WARM AND WELCOMING AND GENUINELY JUST KIND, KIND HEARTED PEOPLE.

Come on Cowboy, come on buddy.

RIEKER'S PIONEERING SPIRIT MAY BE WHY SHE FEELS SUCH AN AFFINITY FOR THE MCKENZIE COUNTY HERITAGE PARK. SHE SERVES AS DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, PRESERVING THE HISTORY OF HOMESTEADERS.

Sandy Rieker: NOT ONLY HAVE THEY ENDURED THE EXTREME TEMPERATURES, BUT THEY'VE ALSO ENDURED WORLD WAR ONE, THE DEPRESSION, DUST BOWL, ALL OF IT.

IN THE PAST TEN YEARS, WATFORD CITY'S POPULATION TRIPLED. AND THAT'S AFTER THE OIL BOOM SLOWED, SENDING MANY OIL WORKERS BACK OUT OF STATE. AS MCKENZIE COUNTY'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR, IT'S DANIEL STENBERG'S JOB TO KEEP BUILDING ON THAT GROWTH. A BIG PART OF THAT IS MAKING NEWCOMERS FEEL WELCOME, A SMALL COMMUNITY WITH BIG OPPORTUNITIES.

Daniel Stenberg: THERE'S JUST BEEN A LOT MORE OPPORTUNITY THAT HAS COME ABOUT BECAUSE OF THE MAJOR GROWTH THAT WE'VE HAD, AND BECAUSE IT HAPPENED THAT QUICKLY, PEOPLE DIDN'T REALLY FIGHT IT. IF WE CAN PROVIDE THAT COMMUNITY WHERE PEOPLE FEEL LIKE THAT THIS IS A PART OF THEM, THEN THEY'RE GOING TO STAY.

Sandy Rieker: I LOVE WHERE WE LIVE. I LOVE OUR LIFE.

IT'S ALL PART OF WHAT STRENGTHENS NORTH DAKOTA. IN WATFORD CITY, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM

STILL AHEAD, THE DROUGHT CAN MAKE ONE PEST WORSE FOR SOYBEAN GROWERS, WE'LL TELL YOU WHAT TO LOOK FOR.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

HOT, DRY CONDITIONS ARE THE PERFECT BREEDING GROUND FOR SPIDER MITES IN SOYBEANS. SO GROWERS SHOULD BE LOOKING FOR THEM IN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS.

NDSU ENTOMOLGIST JANET KNODEL SAYS SPIDER MITES MOVE INTO FIELD EDGES FROM THE DITCHES, WHERE THEY OVERWINTER. THEY FEED ON THE SOYBEAN PLANT LEAVES, AND DECREASE YIELD. SHE ADVISES GROWERS TO START SCOUTING IN THE EARLY FLOWERING TO EARLY POD STAGE. THEY'RE VERY SMALL, SO START AT THE EDGE OF THE FIELD. SHAKE THE PLANTS OVER A SHEET OF WHITE PAPER AND USE A MAGNIFYING GLASS TO LOOK FOR TINY MOVING SPOTS. SCOUT AGAIN ABOUT FIVE DAYS AFTER SPRAYING AS SPIDER MITES REPRODUCE FASTER WHEN TEMPS REACH THE 90S. AND WHEN IT'S DRY, THERE ARE NO FUNGAL DISEASES TO KILL THEM OFF.

Janet Knodel: SO IN ABOUT A WEEK THEY CAN INCREASE FIFTY TIMES, SO YOU CAN SEE HOW WE MIGHT HAVE A PROBLEM WHEN IT'S A DROUGHT AND HOT CONDITIONS.

THERE ARE SEVERAL TREATMENT PRODUCTS, SO WORK WITH YOUR EXTENSION AGENT FOR YOUR BEST OPTION, OR REQUEST EXTENSION'S INSECT MANAGEMENT GUIDE.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.