Coming up on AgweekTV, we will see how the dry hot weather is taking a toll on crops and livestock in the region. We will discuss the ongoing drought and high markets prices that are making marketing and replanting decisions very difficult in northern North Dakota. We will take a look at the tight balance sheet for U.S. crops from the June WASDE Report released by the USDA. Finally, we will visit the North Dakota FFA Convention.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THE HOT DRY WEATHER TAKES ITS TOLL ON CROPS AND LIVESTOCK IN THE REGION.

THE ONGOING DROUGHT AND HIGH PRICES MAKE MARKETING AND REPLANTING DECISIONS VERY DIFFICULT IN NORTHERN NORTH DAKOTA.

USDA RELEASES ANOTHER TIGHT BALANCE SHEET FOR U.S. CROPS IN THE JUNE WASDE REPORT.

Newsletter signup for email alerts

AND WE TAKE YOU TO THE NORTH DAKOTA FFA CONVENTION.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

DRY WEATHER AND SOME RECORD HEAT IN THE REGION CONTINUES TO TAKE A TOLL ON THE CROPS, ESPECIALLY THE DAKOTAS.

SPRING WHEAT FARED THE WORST WITH ONLY 16-PERCENT OF SOUTH DAKOTA'S CROP RATED GOOD TO EXCELLENT AND ONLY 32-PERCENT IN NORTH DAKOTA.

SOUTH DAKOTA'S CORN CONDITION ALSO DROPPED 21-PERCENT AND THE DAKOTAS HAVE LESS THAN 50-PERCENT OF THE CROP RATED GOOD TO EXCELLENT.

AND THE FIRST SOYBEAN RATING PUT NORTH DAKOTA'S CROP A DISMAL 25-PERCENT GOOD TO EXCELLENT, THE WORST SINCE 2000.

THE CROPS MOST SUSCEPTIBLE TO THE EARLY HEAT AND DROUGHT ARE SMALL GRAINS LIKE SPRING WHEAT, WHILE ROW CROPS WILL FARE BETTER AT THIS EARLY GROWTH STAGE.

AGRONOMISTS SAY THE HEAT IS MORE STRESSFUL ON THE CROP THAN THE LACK OF MOISTURE, SINCE SPRING WHEAT IS A COOL SEASON GRASS AND LIKES TEMPERATURES IN THE 50S AND 60S.

Jonathan Kleinjan: Anytime you get an extended period above 75, 80 degrees it really starts cutting into your yield even at the vegetative stage.

ITS EARLY ENOUGH FOR SPRING WHEAT TO SOMEWHAT RECOVER, BUT HE SAYS THE YIELD LOSS DEPENDS ON THE DURATION OF THE HEAT STRESS.

It's hard to put a number on it at this stage but I think you know maybe we've lost 25-percent of our yield potential already.

KLEINJAN ISN'T CONCERNED ABOUT ROW CROPS BECAUSE YIELD ISN'T SET UNTIL THE REPRODUCTIVE STAGE, FOR CORN THAT IS AROUND THE V-8 STAGE.

HE SAYS BEANS HAVE THE ABILITY TO SHUT DOWN WHEN IT'S HOT AND DRY AND WAIT FOR RAIN. PLUS YIELD ISNT SET UNTIL FLOWERING.

A SERIES OF CHALLENGING WEATHER EVENTS HAS SOME NORTH DAKOTA FARMERS FACING TOUGH DECISIONS ABOUT REPLANTING.

MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mikkel Pates: IN NORTHERN NORTH DAKOTA,THEY HAVE DROUGHT, FROST, AND DROUGHT AGAIN, AND THE GREATEST OF THESE IS DROUGHT.

Jason Hanson: WE'VE BEEN TOO WINDY, WE'VE BEEN TOO COLD, WE'VE BEEN TOO HOT, WE'VE BEEN TOO DRY. WE HAVE NOT BEEN TOO WET.

JASON HANSON IS A PRIVATE AGRONOMIST IN NORTH CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA. HE'S BEEN WORKING WITH FARMERS WHO ARE TRYING TO DECIDE WHETHER TO REPLANT, AFTER FROST, DROUGHT AND HIGH WINDS HAVE TAKEN A TOLL ON THEIR CROPS. IT'S EVEN MORE FRUSTRATING, AS CROP PRICES ARE BETTER THAN THEY'VE BEEN IN YEARS.

Jason Hanson: AND IF WE HAD MOISTURE IT WOULD BE AN EASY DECISION, BUT WE DON'T. AND THEN WE GOT THREE DAYS OF 90 PLUS DEGREES. SO ANYTIME YOU PUT ANY EQUIPMENT IN THE FIELD IT DRIES IT OUT EVEN MORE. SO IT'S JUST A VERY EMOTIONAL DECISION TO MAKE RIGHT NOW.

SO IF IT DOESN'T RAIN SOON AND A LOT OF IT, FARMERS WILL BE WORRIED THAT THEY'RE BACK TO A DRY CONDITION THAT THEY HAVEN'T SEEN SINCE THE NINETEEN EIGHTIES DROUGHT.

EVERYBODY IS EXTREMELY NERVOUS.

FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT LEEDS, NORTH DAKOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

WITH SOME RECORD BREAKING TEMPERATURES ABOVE 100 DEGREES THAT'S ALSO PUT LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS ON ALERT.

FOR DAIRY CATTLE, MILK PRODUCTION OFTEN DROPS. SO PRODUCERS NEED TO BE PROACTIVE TO KEEP COWS COMFORTABLE AND HEALTHY.

Tracey Erickson: Take a look at your rations, adjust them there accordingly and work with your nutritionist to do that, always making sure that you've got a lot of plenty of clean fresh sources of water there available for the cows.

THE HEAT CAME ON SUDDENLY AND LIVESTOCK, ESPECIALLY CATTLE, PROBABLY DIDN'T HAVE TIME TO ACCLIMATE.

Dr. Russ Daly: We're worried about temperature, we're worried about humidity, worried about wind speed and then the cloud cover.

DALY SAYS PRODUCERS NEED TO PROVIDE SHADE AND AIR MOVEMENT. RATION CHANGES AND FEEDING LATER IN THE DAY ALSO HELP. HOWEVER, PERFORMANCE WILL BE IMPACTED.

In times of prolonged heat stress then we can start to see those cattle really kind of go backwards.

HOG GAINS ALSO SUFFER AND IN CONFINEMENT GOOD VENTILATION IS A KEY FOR KEEPING THE HERD PRODUCTIVE.

THE JUNE WASDE REPORT WAS RELEASED THURSDAY, WITH TIGHTER ENDING STOCKS FOR FEED GRAINS, BUT HIGHER CARRYOVER FOR SOYBEANS.

ON CORN, NEW CROP ENDING STOCKS WERE LOWERED 150 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT IT CAME DIRECTLY FROM USDA LOWERING OLD CROP CARRYOVER THE SAME AMOUNT. BRAZILIAN CORN PRODUCTION WAS ONLY LOWERED TO 99 MILLION METRIC TONS.\u0009

USDA INCREASED OLD CROP ENDING STOCKS ON BEANS 15 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT AGAIN TRANSFERRED THAT DIRECTLY TO THE NEW CROP FOR THE SAME INCREASE IN CARRYOVER.

AND WHEAT PRODUCTION WAS RAISED 26 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT OLD AND NEW CROP ENDING STOCKS WERE BOTH LOWERED.

JOINING US WITH ANALYSIS IS ALLISON THOMPSON. AND USUALLY THE JUNE REPORT IS KIND OF A PLACECARD HOLDER, BUT WE DID SEE A PRETTY GOOD PULL DOWN IN ENDING STOCKS ON CORN AND WHERE DID THAT COME FROM?

Allison Thompson: TWO THINGS. WE SAW THEM ACTUALLY INCREASE EXPORTS FOR THIS YEAR'S CROP, AND THEY ALSO INCREASED ETHANOL USE TOO FOR CORN. SO BETWEEN THOSE TWO THINGS WE DID SEE A PRETTY GOOD INCREASE IN USAGE, SO THAT DID LOWER OUR ENDING STOCKS SUBSTANTIALLY, WHICH WAS PRETTY BULLISH ON THE CORN SIDE.

YOU BET, BY 150 MILLION BUSHELS, AND WE'RE NOT EVEN FIGURING IN NOW ON NEW CROP LOWER YIELDS, WHICH WE MAY SEE HERE, DON'T YOU THINK?

Allison Thompson: VERY WELL. AND THEY STARTED WITH SUCH A HIGH RECORD YIELD TO START WITH, WE'VE BEEN TELLING GUYS YOU KNOW THEY START SO RECORD HIGH, YOU CAN ONLY GO LOWER FROM HERE, SO. AND WITH THE WEATHER I'D SAY IT'S A FAIRLY STRONG BET THAT WE COULD ACTUALLY BE LOWER AS WE GO THROUGH THE SUMMER.

NOW WE'RE EXPECTING MAYBE AN INCREASE IN ACRES IN THE JUNE REPORT FOR CORN AT THE END OF THE MONTH, BUT WILL THAT MAYBE OFFSET YIELDS DO YOU THINK?

Allison Thompson: OH DEFINITELY I THINK IT WILL TOO. EVEN WITH THE EXTRA ACRES THAT WE SAW GETTING PLANTED. AND SOME OF THOSE FRINGE STATES THIS YEAR WITH SOME TOSS UP ACRES PROBABLY AREN'T GOING TO HAVE RECORD YIELD ON THEM. SO AND THOSE TWO THINGS NORMALLY DON'T GO TOGETHER, RECORD ACRES AND RECORD YIELD. SO ONE OF THE TWO HAS TO CHANGE, AND I THINK THIS YEAR IT PROBABLY WILL BE THE YIELD.

SOYBEAN ENDING STOCKS WERE RAISED FIFTEEN MILLION BUSHELS ON BOTH OLD AND NEW CROP, AND I GUESS WE SHOULDN'T HAVE BEEN SURPRISED, BECAUSE BASIS LEVELS HAVE BEEN KIND OF TELLING ON THAT, HAVEN'T THEY?

YES, YES. YUP. WE KIND OF KNEW GOING INTO THIS REPORT THAT IT WOULD PROBABLY BE A LITTLE BIT OF A BEARISH REPORT FOR SOYBEANS. SO AND THEY WERE TRADING THAT WAY PRIOR TO THE REPORT TOO, BUT YEAH, WE SAW THEM LOWER CRUSH, WHICH ENDED WITH OUR ENDING STOCKS BEING.

BUT WE ARE STILL HISTORICALLY REALLY TIGHT AREN'T WE IN SOYBEANS?

YES WE ARE, WE'RE AT SOME PRETTY RECORD LEVELS FOR TIGHT ENDING STOCKS. SO ANY PRODUCTION HICCUP GOING FORWARD IS DEFINITELY GOING TO PLAY INTO THESE MARKETS.

SO WHEAT, WE SAW AN INCREASE IN PRODUCTION, WHERE DID THAT COME FROM?

Allison Thompson: WINTER WHEAT. AND WE KIND OF KNEW THAT WAS COMING TOO FROM THE KANSAS WINTER WHEAT TOUR. SO IT WASN'T REALLY A BIG SURPRISE THERE ON THE U.S. SIDE TO SEE A LITTLE BIT OF AN INCREASE IN PRODUCTION.

BUT ENDING STOCKS WERE ACTUALLY LOWERED, SO WE'RE GOING TO PUT MORE FEED WHEAT INTO THE MIX?

YES, WE'RE USING SOME RESIDUALS MORE THERE IN FEED WHEAT, YES.

SO NOW THE FOCUS KIND OF GOES TO WEATHER, RIGHT ALLISON?

Allison Thompson: YES. WE'RE STARTING TO SEE IT BECOME A WEATHER MARKET HERE IN THE U.S., AND ALSO ACROSS THE GLOBE, ESPECIALLY FOR WHEAT.

SO IF WE STAY HOT AND DRY, HOW MUCH HIGHER COULD THESE PRICES GO?

HONESTLY WE'VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT IT IN OUR OFFICE. WE AREN'T FOR SURE PUTTING OUT ANY PRICE RECOMMENDATIONS OUT THERE. BUT WE COULD DEFINITELY SEE PRICES GO ANOTHER DOLLAR OR TWO, ESPECIALLY IF WE SEE THIS DRY WEATHER GO MORE INTO THE CORN BELT, WHICH FORECASTS ARE KIND OF LOOKING LIKE.

ALL RIGHT, WELL THANKS FOR JOINING US TODAY. APPRECIATE YOUR ANALYSIS. >

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCED IT WILL REPEAL THE TRUMP ERA WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES RULE AND IS WORKING ON A PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE NAVIGABLE WATERS DEFINITIONS IN THE CLEAN WATER ACT.

EPA ASKED A FEDERAL COURT TO REMAND WOTUS CITING ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION. EPA WILL CONDUCTING WOTUS LISTENING SESSIONS TO REWRITE THE RULE AND INCLUDING ONE IN NORTH DAKOTA IN JULY.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, IT'S ALL ABOUT DAIRY IN JUNE INCLUDING DAIRYFEST AND THE GOT MILK GALA.

THE WORLD'S LARGEST PORK TRADE SHOW RESUMED. AFTER CANCELLING IN 2020 DUE TO COVID, AND AFRICAN SWINE FEVER THE YEAR BEFORE, THE WORLD PORK EXPO RETURNED THIS YEAR.

PRODUCERS HAVE FACED BIG CHALLENGES THE LAST THREE YEARS, INCLUDING CHINESE TARIFFS AND COVID PLANT SHUTDOWNS THAT CAUSED THOUSANDS OF PIGS TO BE EUTHANIZED.

NPPC OFFICER AND PIPESTONE, MINNESOTA PRODUCER TERRY WOLTERS SAYS NOW THEY'RE FIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S PROPOSITION 12, WHICH MANDATES LARGER SPACES FOR GESTATING HOGS. STUDIES INDICATE IT WILL BE COSTLY TO IMPLEMENT, AND INCREASE FOOD COSTS.

ANOTHER CONCERN, AN COURT RULING THAT WILL SLOW NSIS LINE SPEEDS IN PROCESSING PLANTS, TO DECREASE WORKER INJURIES. ITS PROJECTED TO COST PRODUCERS $80 MILLION.

Terry Wolters: WE'VE GOT MORE PIGS COMING AT US, WE HAVE AN INCREASED INDUSTRY, AN EXPANDED INDUSTRY OVER A NUMBER OF YEARS. SO THE PIPELINE'S FULL OF PIGS AND THAT'S GOING TO CREATE A PROBLEM.

WEDNESDAY THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION DECIDED NOT TO TAKE A POSITION ON A REQUEST BY MEATPACKERS TO DELAY THE RULING.

ANOTHER EVENT THAT RESUMED AFTER A HIATUS IN 2020 WAS DAIRYFEST, INCLUDING THE GOT MILK GALA. IT LOOKED A BIT DIFFERENT THAN PAST YEARS, BUT STILL PROVIDED A VENUE TO SHOW THE IMPACT THE INDUSTRY MAKES IN THE REGION.

Dairyfest kicked off with the Got Milk Gala, a celebration of South Dakota's dairy industry.

Darrel Rennich: We have seen tremendous growth we're leading the country in over 12-percent growth in the dairy industry along this I-29 corridor.

The keynoter was the founder of Dairy Girl Network, which supports women in the business.

Laura Daniels: It is such an awesome source of information and real time real advice from real farmers and real women.

The Dairyfest carnival was a drive through experience and families lined up to see dairy cattle and the technology used in the industry like robotic milkers.

Kristin Pronschinske: I'm talking to our consumers about how cows come into the robot, why they're getting milked in the robot and where the products are coming from.

Another stop illustrated how dairy cattle are sustainable and how their manure is used to generate energy and fertilize crops.

Denver Stage: I am teaching people about how we recycle nutrients, recycle manure, as we need those nutrients for our fields."

Dairyfest also featured a milk truck and the feedstuffs cows eat to produce milk.

Bob Noland: We learned how much better the cows are at giving milk, more than 22,000 pounds a year.

And participants got treated to cheese and SDSU ice cream.

Katie Pinke: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TAKE YOU TO FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA FOR THE STATE FFA CONVENTION, WHERE I'LL INTRODUCE YOU TO THE WENDELL SIBLINGS, ALL LIVESTOCK JUDGERS.

Emily Beal: AND I'LL INTRODUCE YOU TO THE AXT FAMILY THAT ARE ALL AG EDUCATORS, SPREAD ACROSS THE STATE.

THE REGION SAW CONTINUED HOT DRY WEATHER THIS WEEK, ACCOMPANIED BY SOME SEVERE WEATHER. WHAT'S AHEAD?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STATE FFA CONVENTION WAS HELD IN FARGO THIS WEEK. . KATIE PINKE TALKED TO THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP LIVESTOCK JUDGING TEAM, MADE UP OF THE THREE WENDEL SIBLINGS FROM LAMOURE.

Katie Pinke: HOW DID YOU GET TO BE A TEAM OF LIVESTOCK JUDGERS WITH YOUR SIBLINGS?

Reed Wendel: IT STARTED WHEN WE WERE LITTLE, JUNIOR 4-H, WE HAD A REALLY STRONG JUNIOR TEAM AT DICKEY COUNTY. AND IT KIND OF GREW FROM THERE.

Katie Pinke: AND HOW ABOUT YOU ROSE? HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED? OR DID THEY HAVE TO DRAG YOU ALONG OR WAS IT NATURAL FOR YOU?

Rose Wendel: WE USED TO ACTUALLY JUDGE WITH TWO OF THE STATE OFFICERS NOW, CALEB AND CALLI HAUK THEY WERE ON OUR 4-H TEAM FOR THE LONGEST TIME, AND THOSE TWO AND REED AND I JUST ALWAYS KIND OF LOOKED UP TO THEM, SO THAT'S KIND OF WHERE I STARTED TO GET MORE INVOLVED WITH IT.

Katie Pinke: AND RYDER, YOU'RE THE LAST SIBLING TO JOIN THE TEAM. YOU'RE GOING TO BE A TENTH GRADER IN THE FALL. TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WORKING WITH YOUR SIBLINGS.

Ryder Wendel: I JUST ENJOY IT I GUESS, BEING BY THEM AND HELPING THEM, WHENEVER. THEY GIVE ME POINTERS ON WHAT TO DO AND WHAT NOT TO DO. IT'S JUST FUN JUDGING WITH THEM.

HOW DO YOU PREPARE TOGETHER?

Reed Wendel: WE HAVE A BULL SALE AND ME AND RYDER AND ROSE WE ALL HELP DAD WRITE FOOTNOTES FOR THAT, AND WE HELP MAKE THE SALE ORDER SO WE END UP LIVESTOCK JUDGING CATTLE ON A DAILY BASIS.

Katie Pinke: HOW HAS YOUR FFA AND 4-H EXPERIENCE PREPARED YOU FOR YOUR FUTURE?

Reed Wendel: IN HELPS YOU IN WHOLE A DIFFERENT ASPECT, JUST YOUR PUBLIC SPEAKING, GETTING UP IN FRONT OF PEOPLE, TO SHAKE PEOPLES' HANDS EVEN.

Katie Pinke: HOW ABOUT YOU, RYDER?

Ryder Wendel: I DON'T KNOW, I GUESS IT HELPED ME LIKE WHEN WE WERE LOOKING THROUGH CATTLE TO BUY, IT HELPS US PICK OUT WHAT ONES ARE GOOD TO US AND WHAT ONES WE WANT.

Katie Pinke: THANKS SO MUCH FOR JOINING US, AND AGAIN, THE WENDEL SIBLINGS FROM LAMOURE, NORTH DAKOTA.

NEXT THE WENDELS WILL COMPETE AT NATIONALS.

FOR ONE NORTH DAKOTA FAMILY, TEACHING AG IS THE FAMILY BUSINESS. EMILY BEAL CAUGHT UP WITH THREE MEMBERS OF THE AXT FAMILY, AT THE STATE FFA CONVENTION.

Emily Beal: FOR MANY, THE STATE FFA CONVENTION IS A PLACE TO SEE OLD FRIENDS, BUT FOR THESE THREE TEACHERS, IT'S A PLACE FOR A FAMILY REUNION.

Carissa Axt: WE'RE ALWAYS TALKING WORK, AND FFA OR AG ED. SO WE DO COLLABORATE WITH EACH OTHER A LOT. IT'S JUST NICE TO HAVE THAT PERSON YOU KNOW, OR PEOPLE YOU KNOW, THAT YOU CAN REACH OUT TO

CARISSA AXT AND HER BROTHER DAVE GREW UP ON A FARM IN CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA, AND THEIR DAD IS AN AG TEACHER. SO IT SHOULD COME AS NO SURPRISE THAT THEY'RE KEEPING IT ALL IN THE FAMILY. NOW THEY'RE ALSO AG TEACHERS AND FFA ADVISORS.

Dave Axt: I THINK IT'S PROBABLY MORE INTERESTING OR AMUSING FOR OUR STUDENTS, BECAUSE THEY'RE ALWAYS INTERESTED TO SEE LIKE, WHEN ARE WE GOING TO SEE YOUR DAD, OR ARE WE GOING TO HANG OUT WITH YOUR SISTER'S CHAPTER?

MICHAEL AXT STARTED HIS CAREER AS AN AG TEACHER FOR A FEW YEARS, BUT THEN HE RETURNED TO THE FAMILY FARM FOR ALMOST THIRTY YEARS, BEFORE RETURNING TO THE CLASSROOM. HE'S PROUD TO BE ABLE TO INFLUENCE KIDS, AND WATCH HIS OWN CHILDREN IN THEIR AG ED CAREERS.

Michael Axt: IT'S FUN, AND YET AT THE SAME TIME IT'S SOMETHING THAT, WE VERY SELDOM EVER TALK SHOP WHEN WE GET TOGETHER AS A FAMILY BECAUSE WE SEE EACH OTHER DURING WINTER CDE'S AND OTHER FFA ACTIVITIES.

Carissa Axt: I DON'T THINK THERE'S A MORE FULFILLING CAREER THAN AG ED, THE KIDS' LIVES THAT YOU TOUCH, THE COMMUNITY MEMBERS THAT YOU GET TO KNOW, AND REALLY JUST BUILDING THAT NEXT GENERATION. THE LIVES YOU'LL TOUCH, EVEN IF IT'S ONLY ONE KID, COMES BACK AND SAYS HEY THANK YOU, IT'S WORTH IT.

IN FARGO, THIS IS EMILY BEAL FOR AGWEEK.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, HIGHLIGHTING THE IMPORTANCE OF WOMEN IN AG..

WOMEN ARE A GROWING FORCE IN AGRICULTURE AND THAT WAS HIGHLIGHTED.

AT THE 11TH ANNUAL AG WOMEN'S DAY, WHERE WOMEN OF ALL FACETS OF THE BUSINESS SHARED A DAY OF EDUCATION AND NETWORKING.

Gail Gullickson: And just celebrate the role each of them has in agriculture and especially in South Dakota as certainly a leading industry for us in our state.

THE KEYNOTE SPEAKERS WERE HUNTER PINKE AND HIS MOM KATIE, WHO SHARED THE INSPIRATIONAL STORY OF HUNTER'S PARALYZING SKIING ACCIDENT AND HIS JOURNEY TO RECOVERY.

Hunter Pinke: I think my story gives hope of whatever you're going through that you can get through it and that you can make it a better situation and learn something from it.

MORE THAN 200 WOMEN PARTICIPATED IN THE EVENT.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.