Coming up on AgweekTV, we will discuss congress and the President continuing to work out a compromise on an infrastructure package. We will see Minnesota's water water quality program reach a milestone with bigger participation in sight. We will visit a Minnesota company with a revolutionary ag manufacturing technology. Finally, we will assess crop damage from the late May freeze in parts of the region.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

CONGRESS AND THE PRESIDENT CONTINUE TO WORK OUT A COMPROMISE ON AN INFRASTRUCTURE PACKAGE.

MINNESOTA'S WATER QUALITY PROGRAM REACHES A MILESTONE WITH BIGGER PARTICIPATION GOALS IN SIGHT.

I'll introduce you to a Minnesota company with a revolutionary ag manufacturing technology you won't find anywhere else in the country.

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AND WE'LL ASSESS CROP DAMAGE FROM THE LATE MAY FREEZE IN PARTS OF THE REGION.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

CONGRESS CONTINUES TO WORK ON INFRASTRUCTURE, BOTH PRESENT REAUTHORIZATION AND NEGOTIATIONS TO GET AN AGREEMENT ON A NEW PACKAGE.

BEFORE THE MEMORIAL DAY BREAK, REPUBLICAN SENATORS ANNOUNCED A NEW COUNTER OFFER CLOSE TO $1 TRILLION, WITH THE WHITE HOUSE LOWERING THE COST OF ITS INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN FROM $2.3 TO $1.7 TRILLION. HOWEVER, ITS UNSURE IF THEY WILL BE ABLE TO REACH A COMPROMISE BEFORE BIDEN'S DEADLINE RUNS OUT.

Sen. Mike Rounds: I'm not ready to call social welfare programs infrastructure. If we can't get to that point, we're not going to get a bi-partisan deal done.

LAST WEEK, A SENATE COMMITTEE DID PASS THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION REAUTHORIZATION ACT, TO INCREASE FUNDING FOR HIGHWAYS, ROADS AND BRIDGES, BY 34-PERCENT TO OVER $300 BILLION OVER FIVE YEARS.

POSSIBLE FROST AND FREEZE DAMAGE OCCURED IN THE LAST PART OF MAY WITH LOWS IN THE UPPER 20S AND LOWER 30 DEGREE RANGE IN THE NORTH PLAINS AND AS FAR SOUTH AS EASTERN IOWA.

DRY BEANS AND SOYBEANS, WERE HARDEST HIT BUT YIELD LOSSES WON'T BE KNOWN FOR A FEW DAYS. AGRONOMISTS SAY FOR SOYBEANS THE COTYLEDON STAGE IS MORE FORGIVING THAN FURTHER STAGES IN GROWTH, BUT THE NEXT TWO WEEKS WILL BE CRITICAL.

Hans Kandel: THEY MAY RECOVER OR NOT, BUT WE ARE APPROACHING A PERIOD WITH VERY HIGH TEMPERATURES, WHICH IS ALSO VERY DRY. SO THE CONDITIONS ARE NOT VERY FAVORABLE FOR RECOVERY FOR THE PLANTS.

HE SAYS IT MAY BE TOO LATE TO REPLANT BEANS, ESPECIALLY WITH THE DRY SOILS LIMITING EMERGENCE.

If you replant right now it is not likely that you will get it established until the middle of June and by that time we're giving up some yield potential.

FOR CORN, IF THE GROWING POINT WAS ABOVE THE GROUND IT IS ALSO SUSCEPTIBLE AND THERE WILL EITHER BE YIELD LOSS OR SOME REPLANTING.

HE SAYS SPRING WHEAT IS MORE COLD TOLERANT AND SAW ONLY SLIGHT DAMAGE.

IN ADDITION TO POSSIBLE FROST DAMAGE, CROPS IN THE NORTHWESTERN CORN BELT ARE UNDER DROUGHT STRESS AND THAT WAS EVIDENT IN THE FIRST CORN CONDITION RATING OF THE SEASON.

SOUTH DAKOTA ONLY HAD 67-PERCENT OF THE CORN RATED GOOD TO EXCELLENT, WHILE NORTH DAKOTA WAS A DISMAL 48-PERCENT. CONTRAST THAT TO IOWA AND NEBRASKA, BOTH IN THE 80S.

SPRING WHEAT CONDITIONS ALSO CONTINUE TO DETERIORATE IN SOUTH DAKOTA AT ONLY 45-PERCENT GOOD TO EXCELLENT AND NORTH DAKOTA AT ONLY 31-PERCENT.

THE RESULTS OF THE 2021 PLANTING SEASON HAVE VARIED ACCORDING TO WHERE YOU'RE LOCATED IN THE REGION, BUT OVERALL IT WAS BETTER THAN A YEAR AGO.

THE SPRING OF 2020 WAS COLD AND WET, CAUSING PLANTING DELAYS AND CHALLENGES. BUT THIS YEAR, FARMERS HAVE DEALT WITH DROUGHT OR EVEN FROST.

BROTHERS MITCH AND BEN FIELD FARM ABOUT A THOUSAND ACRES IN WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA. THEY WERE ABLE TO START PLANTING IN LATE APRIL, AND WRAPPED UP IN MID-MAY. IT WENT WELL, ALTHOUGH SOIL TEMPERATURES WERE COOL

Mitch Field: THE CORN TOOK ABOUT TEN TO TWELVE DAYS FOR IT TO COME UP BECAUSE THE SOIL WAS A LITTLE COLD, BUT WE HAVE SOME CORN NOW THAT'S SIX INCHES TALL ALREADY, AND BEANS ARE LOOKING REALLY GOOD TOO.

JASON SCHATZKE SAYS IT'S BEEN A BETTER SEASON ON HIS FARM IN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA. HE SAYS PLANTING WRAPPED UP IN LATE MAY, AND THEY COULD REALLY USE A RAIN.

Jason: Have not had significant rain at our farm, in excess of an inch, at one any given time, since Labor Day of last fall. That was a good thing, because we had all those sins we had created in the spring of 2020 and the fall of 2019. We went from one end of the spectrum to the other one.

THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONFIRMS PALMER AMARANTH HAS BEEN FOUND IN A FIELD IN POLK COUNTY.

SEVERAL DEAD PALMER PLANTS WERE FOUND ON THE FIELD'S EDGE FROM LAST YEAR. THE LANDOWNER IS WORKING WITH MDA TO ERADICATE ANY WEEDS GOING FORWARD. THE DEPARTMENT BELIEVES THE ISSUE IS JUST IN ONE FIELD AND THEY CONTINUE TO MONITOR THE AREA.

IN OTHER CROP PROTECTION NEWS, BAYER, MAKER OF ROUNDUP, HAS HAD A JUDGE DENY THE APPROVAL OF ITS SETTLEMENT FOR CLAIMS SAYING THE PURPORTED BENEFITS HAVE BEEN EXAGGERATED. THE COMPANY PUT FORTH A $2 BILLION PLAN TO ADDRESS A PROPOSED CLASS OF PLAINTIFFS WHO HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO GLYPHOSATE AND NOT FILED LAWSUITS AGAINST THE COMPANY.

POET HAS ACQUIRED THE BIOETHANOL ASSETS OF KANSAS BASED FLINT HILLS RESOURCES IN THEIR ENTIRETY.

THIS EXPANDS POET'S PRODUCTION CAPACITY BY 40-PERCENT. THE DEAL INCLUDES SIX BIOPROCESSING FACILITIES IN IOWA AND NEBRASKA, PLUS TWO TERMINALS IN TEXAS AND GEORGIA. POET WILL NOW OPERATE 33 PLANTS ACROSS 8 STATES WITH AN ANNUAL CAPACITY OF 3 BILLION GALLONS.

THE WORLD'S LARGEST MEAT PACKER WAS THE TARGET OF A CRIMINAL CYBER ATTACK THIS WEEK, WHICH AFFECTED SOME OF THE SERVERS SUPPORTING ITS I-T SYSTEMS.

JBS TEMPORARILY SHUT DOWN PROCESSING OPERATIONS IN AUSTRALIA AND NORTH AMERICA EARLY IN THE WEEK. THAT INCLUDED FIVE OF THE COMPANY'S BIGGEST BEEF PLANTS IN THE U.S., WHICH ACCOUNT FOR 22,500 HEAD A DAY OR NEARLY 23-PERCENT OF AMERICA'S PRODUCTION. PORK OPERATIONS WERE ALSO IMPACTED WHICH MAKE UP ONE-FIFTH OF ALL U.S. SLAUGHTER CAPACITY. A VAST MAJORITY OF PLANTS WERE REOPENED THOUGH BY WEDNESDAY.

Noah Fish: COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL TAKE A LOOK AT HOW MINNESOTA FARMERS ARE TAKING STEPS TO SAVE THE STATE'S WATER.

A PROGRAM TO PROTECT MINNESOTA'S SOIL AND WATER IS PROVING TO BE A POPULAR ONE.

ONE THOUSAND FARMERS ARE TAKING PART IN THE MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL WATER QUALITY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM.

IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY, NOAH FISH TALKED TO ONE OF THE FARMERS BENEFITING FROM THE PRACTICES.

Noah Fish: ACCORDING TO THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, OVER A THOUSAND FARMERS AND OVER EIGHT HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES HAVE BEEN CERTIFIED THROUGH THE WATER QUALITY CERTIFICATION

PROGRAM. NEARLY TWO THOUSAND NEW CONSERVATION PRACTICES HAVE BEEN IMPLEMENTED.

Joan Heim-Welch: GRADE STABILIZATION STRUCTURES, DIVERSIONS, PONDS...

THOSE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE CONSERVATION PRACTICES THAT JOAN HEIM-WELCH USES ON HER SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA FARM. SHE MANAGES 600 ACRES OF ROLLING LAND ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, WHERE SHE RAISES BEEF CATTLE AND GROWS ROW CROPS. AND SHE'S DEDICATED TO CONSERVATION.

Joan Heim-Welch: I DO TALL GRASS PRAIRIES, I HAVE POLLINATORS, AND THEN ALL THE WOODS THAT I KEEP UP. WE PLANTED THREE THOUSAND TREES THIS LAST NOVEMBER. AND SHOW ALL THE THINGS YOU CAN DO WITH WATERWAYS, DIVERSIONS, PONDS, FOREST STAND IMPROVEMENT, THERE'S A LOT OF THINGS THAT HAPPEN HERE.

MINNESOTA'S WATER QUALITY PROGRAM STARTED LESS THAN A DECADE AGO II, AND HAS GROWN TO BE THE BIGGEST, AND MOST COMPREHENSIVE IN THE COUNTRY. PROGRAM MANAGER BRAD REDLIN THINKS IT'S SO SUCCESSFUL BECAUSE IT'S GROWER-LED.

Brad Redlin: YOU DO SOMETHING THAT MAY BE INTENDED FOR WATER QUALITY BENEFIT, BUT IT WILL HAVE MULTIPLE BENEFITS FOR OTHER ASPECTS. NATURAL RESOURCES, AND FOR YOU KNOW, EVEN, YOU KNOW, THE FARMER'S BOTTOM LINE.

REDLIN SAYS FARMS IN THE PROGRAM ARE ABOUT TWENTY PERCENT MORE PROFITABLE THAN BEFORE CERTIFICATION. MINNESOTA AG COMMISSIONER THOM PETERSON SAYS HE LOVES TO VISIT FARMERS IN THE PROGRAM.

Thom Petersen: THEY'RE VERY PROUD OF THE PRACTICES THEY PUT IN, THINGS THAT THEY DID ON THEIR FARMS TO HELP IMPROVE WATER QUALITY ON THEIR FARM AND FOR THEIR COMMUNITIES, AND SO VERY EXCITING AND WE'RE VERY PROUD OF THIS PROGRAM.

THE GOAL IS TO HAVE A MILLION ACRES IN THE PROGRAM BY NEXT YEAR. IN BROWNSVILLE, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.>

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

USDA HAS ANNOUNCED A NEW PROGRAM TO GIVE GROWERS A PREMIUM BENEFIT ON THEIR CROP INSURANCE OF 5-DOLLARS PER ACRE IF THEY USE COVER CROPS IN 2021. THE PANDEMIC COVER CROP PROGRAM IS BEING OFFERED BY RMA TO HELP FARMERS MAINTAIN COVER CROPS DESPITE FINANCIAL CHALLENGES POSED BY THE PANDEMIC. GROWERS MUST FILE THEIR ACREAGE REPORT WITH FSA BY JUNE 15 TO QUALITY.

A LUVERNE, MINNESOTA COMPANY IS USING A REVOLUTIONARY NEW TECHNOLOGY TO BRING A DIFFERENT KIND OF FLOORING SLATE TO THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY. DESPITE THE CHALLENGES OF THE PANDEMIC AND HIGHER PRODUCTION COSTS THEY'RE PROJECTING SALES WILL QUADRUPLE IN THE COMING YEAR, DUE TO RENEWED STRENGTH IN THE AG MARKETS.

Midwest Dry Cast is the only manufacturer in the U.S. that produces a five-inch concrete slat and beams for use in hog barns through a dry cast process, instead of the traditional wet cast method.

Aaron Waldner : So we've got a thicker slat that nobody else in the industry has, made out of dry cast, which is a really super strong ultra-high-performance concrete.

They also invested in automation equipment from France which adjusts to the environment. Plus, it finishes the slats with a hot-steam process that extends the slat life to match the facility life, which is around 40 years.

Waldner: But if you steam it, with heat and with moisture it slows down that deterioration over many years.

The company started in the fall of 2018, posting strong sales. Like most businesses they experienced a slow down during the pandemic but have more than recovered.

Waldner: Since we started, we pretty much doubled our output the first two years and we're looking at quadrupling it this year with everything that's going on in the ag market.

Their biggest challenge is keeping their prices stable with the rising cost of their main aggregates, powders and other inputs.

Waldner: We've been able to absorb it as much as possible. Obviously, it's impossible to do all of it. Our biggest price increase this past year has been rebar.

Despite that, they have an aggressive growth plan and are looking at ways to help not only producers building new facilities but also those that want to remodel and get another 20 years of life out of a barn. They're also looking to diversify into non-agricultural products.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WITH THE RISING COST OF STEEL AND OTHER MATERIALS, WE'LL HAVE SOME ADVICE ON KEEPING COSTS DOWN.

HOT DRY WEATHER RETURNED TO THE NORTHERN PRAIRIES THIS WEEK. HOW LONG WILL THIS HIGH PRESSURE RIDGE DOMINATE OUR FORECAST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

YOU'VE LIKELY NOTICED THE COST OF BUILDING MATERIALS HAS CLIMBED SUBSTANTIALLY. THAT COULD BE PUTTING YOUR AG PROJECTS ON HOLD, BUT AS JENNY SCHLECHT FOUND, IF YOU'RE THINKING ABOUT NEW GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, YOU MIGHT HAVE SOME OPTIONS FOR CUTTING COSTS.

WE'RE HERE WITH RODIE JELLEBERG FROM SUPERIOR GRAIN, AND WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT STEEL PRICES. THIS IS SOMETHING A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE NOTICED, PRICES ARE UP, AVAILABILITY ISN'T ALWAYS WHAT IT USED TO BE. WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT WHAT YOU GUYS ARE SEEING.

Rodie Jelleberg: IN THE INDUSTRY, EVERYTHING IS GOING UP, STEEL PRICES, BUILDING MATERIALS, ALUMINUM, A BIG PART OF IT IS THE PANDEMIC FROM LAST YEAR. EVERYTHING WAS SHUT DOWN, ALL YOUR MANUFACTURING FACILITIES WERE SHUT DOWN, WHICH STARTED THAT TREND EARLY, JUST WE DIDN'T SEE IT UNTIL IT'S STARTING TO CATCH UP WITH US NOW. THE BIGGEST FACTORS AT PLAY, THERE ARE SOME MILLS THAT ARE GOING DOWN FOR MAINTENANCE, SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE, SOME IS UNSCHEDULED. BUT THERE'S ALSO A COUPLE MILLS COMING ONLINE THAT HAVE BEEN IN THE WORKS FOR A FEW YEARS. WHICH IS GOING TO HELP. WE'VE TALKED TO NUMEROUS STEEL SUPPLIERS, AND THEY'RE SAYING THE PRICING AND THE AVAILABILITY IS NOT GOING TO REALLY IMPROVE AT LEAST THROUGH THE THIRD QUARTER. WHICH IS KIND OF SCARY FOR EVERYBODY. WE TYPICALLY DO OUR STEEL BUYS IN THE EARLY FALL, AND WE KIND OF BASE IT ON WHAT WE THINK WE'RE GOING TO SELL FOR THE NEXT YEAR. SO WE DID A PRETTY GOOD JOB OF THAT. WE ACTUALLY HAVE STEEL IN RIGHT NOW. THERE'S A LOT OF MANUFACTURERS OUT THERE THAT ARE SAYING LATE FALL DELIVERY OR EVEN THAT THEY ARE COMPLETELY BOOKED UP. AND WE HAVE THE ADVANTAGE OF BEING ABLE TO MOVE SOME THINGS AROUND AND BE ABLE TO GET PRODUCT OUT THE DOOR FOR SPRING AND SUMMER DELIVERY AND CONSTRUCTION STILL.

SO ANYTHING ELSE THAT YOU THINK PEOPLE SHOULD KNOW AS THEY'RE PREPARING TO MAYBE MAKE THESE PURCHASES?

Rodie Jelleberg: ONE OF THE BIGGEST THINGS I THINK WOULD BE TO LOOK AT WHAT DO YOU NEED? AND WE CAN ALSO, YOU KNOW, WE HAVE AN IN-HOUSE TEAM THAT CAN DO SOME SITE DESIGNS AND SITE DRAWINGS. AND IF YOU WANT A BIGGER SYSTEM AND YOU JUST DON'T WANT TO SPEND ALL THAT MONEY RIGHT NOW, OR JUST DON'T HAVE THE CAPACITY TO DO IT, DO WHAT YOU NEED, BUT PRE-PLAN AND DON'T SHORT YOURSELF BY PUTTING IN SMALLER EQUIPMENT JUST BECAUSE YOU WANT TO GET, YOU KNOW, THIS ONE PROJECT DONE. IF GUYS HAVE QUESTIONS THEY CAN ALWAYS REACH OUT TO US. WE'VE GOT A REALLY PASSIONATE TEAM, WE LOVE WHAT WE DO.

THANKS RODIE. YOU CAN CONTACT SUPERIOR GRAIN WITH ALL OF YOUR QUESTIONS ON GRAIN HANDLING AND GRAIN DRYING BY VISITING THEIR WEBSITE, GIVING THEM A CALL, OR CONTACTING THEM ON SOCIAL MEDIA.

STILL AHEAD, WE'LL TAKE YOU BACK TO THE DAYS OF HOME DAIRY DELIVERIES.

GROCERY DELIVERY HAS INCREASED IN POPULARITY, ESPECIALLY DURING THE PANDEMIC. BUT YOU MAY STILL REMEMBER WHEN MILK AND OTHER DAIRY PRODUCTS WERE DELIVERED TO HOMES BY TRUCK.\u0009MIKKEL PATES MET A MINNESOTA FAMILY KEEPING A LITTLE DAIRY NOSTALGIA ALIVE.

John Larson: I'LL SAY I'M A CAR GUY. I'VE ALWAYS BEEN A CAR GUY. I'VE WORKED ON CARS SINCE I WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL.

BUT NOW, IT SEEMS JOHN LARSON IS ALSO A DAIRY TRUCK GUY.

HERE'S THE ORIGINAL AD FOR A D FIFTEEN M.

LARSON AND HIS WIFE SHARON AND FAMILY HAVE BOUGHT AND RESTORED MANY VINTAGE CARS OVER THE YEARS. BUT IN 2017, THEY BOUGHT THIS 1939 INTERNATIONAL MILK DELIVERY TRUCK.

John Larson: IT IS, I THINK, VERY, EXTREMELY RARE. WE'VE DONE A LOT OF RESEARCH AND FOUND ONE OTHER GENTLEMAN IN MISSOURI THAT HAD ONE.

THE REAR IS APPOINTED WITH INTERIOR WOOD, WITH A CANVAS TOP, AND LARSON THINKS IT'S LARGELY ORIGINAL. IT'S DECORATED WITH SIGNAGE FOR THE FORMER ARKULARY GROCERY COMPANY BASED IN DULUTH. THE TRUCK IS THOUGHT TO HAVE DELIVERED MILK IN THAT COMMUNITY FROM THE 1940s to the 1960s. IN ITS LATER YEARS IT WAS USED IT FOR STORE PROMOTIONS. LARSON AND HIS WIFE LOVE THE NOSTALGIA OF A SIMPLER TIME.

Sharon Larson: I REMEMBER GOING TO THE DAIRY FARM BECAUSE THAT'S HOW WE BOUGHT OUR MILK. AND HE BROUGHT BIG PLASTIC ONE GALLON JUGS. AND MY MOM WOULD SKIM THE CREAM OFF THE TOP FOR BAKING. AND THEN THAT'S THE MILK THAT WE DRANK, AND IT WAS WONDERFUL.

AND THEN IT HAS AN AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION NOW. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN A THREE SPEED, BUT WE DID THAT FOR JUST FOR DRIVABILITY.

THE LARSONS SAY THEY ENJOY DRIVING THE TRUCK AROUND TOWN, AND HAVE PLANS TO TAKE IT TO CAR SHOWS.

John Larson: WHEN WE DRIVE IT, I THINK PEOPLE OUR AGE YOU KNOW LOOK AND SMILE AND WAVE. AND THEN SOME OF THE YOUNGER FOLKS LOOK AT IT AND DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT IT IS, NEVER SEEN ONE BEFORE.

AND THEY SAY THEY'RE HAPPY IF THEIR NEW RIDE ALSO HELPS PROMOTE DAIRY PRODUCTS. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES IN MOORHEAD, MINNESOTA.>

LARSON SAYS THE OTHER TRUCK LIKE IT STILL IN EXISTENCE IS NOW IN A MUSEUM.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.