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Ag on agenda at MN Realtors' meeting

Organics, wind farms, solar farms, vineyards and more will be among the topics at the summer conference of the Realtors Land Institute, Minnesota Chapter.

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Organics, wind farms, solar farms, vineyards and more will be among the topics at the summer conference of the Realtors Land Institute, Minnesota Chapter.

The event, being promoted to all Minnesota Realtors as well as Realtors Land Institute members, will be held Aug.22-23 in New Ulm, Minn.

A strong lineup of speakers, roundtable discussions, networking opportunities, a farm-to-table luncheon and continuing education credits for real estate professionals are among the attractions, says Terri Jensen with National Land Realty. A member of the Minnesota chapter and 2015 national president of the Realtors Land Institute, a Chicago-based professional organization, she's helping to organize the event in New Ulm.

Ag-related highlights of the event will include:

Thursday, Aug. 23:

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8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.: Wind Farms - Leases, Revenue and Profit, Brad Haight of Lease Gen.

9:00 a.m. to 11.45 a.m.: Round tables on: "Land's Changing Landscape."

• Hydroponics, Marco de Bruin of RevolGreens

• Organics, Jay Watson of General Mills

• Solar farms, Brian Keenan of IPS Solar

• Vineyards, Matthew Clark with University of Minnesota Extension

• Ninth District Federal Reserve land values and credit, Joe Mahon with the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

There is a fee to attend. The registration deadline is Aug. 10.

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For more information, contact Jensen at mnlandrealtor@gmail.com .

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