Coming up on AgweekTV, we will talk about USDA beginning to shape labels for cell cultured food products. We will discuss sugar producers getting some good news on 2021 production and payments. We'll look over some changes that may be coming for dicamba use in the 2022 growing season. Finally, we'll see a new electronic grading system that may be a game changer for the potato industry.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

USDA BEGINS SHAPING LABELS FOR CELL CULTURED FOOD PRODUCTS.

SUGAR PRODUCERS GET SOME GOOD NEWS ON 2021 PRODUCTION AND PAYMENTS.

CHANGES MAY BE COMING FOR DICAMBA USE IN THE 2022 GROWING SEASON....

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AND A NEW ELECTRONIC GRADING SYSTEM MAY BE A GAME CHANGER FOR THE POTATO INDUSTRY.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AND SOME STATES ARE CONSIDERING CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION RESTRICTIONS OF DICAMBA AFTER OFF-TARGET SPRAY DRIFT PROBLEMS IN 2021.

AFTER A RECORD 340 DRIFT COMPLAINTS IN 2021, THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANNOUNCED THEY'RE WORKING WITH EPA AND PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS TO IMPLEMENT STATE-SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS ON FOUR DICAMBA PRODUCTS FOR THE 2022 GROWING SEASON. THE RULES WOULD PROHIBIT SPRAYING OVER 85 DEGREES AND AFTER JUNE 12 SOUTH OF I-94. NORTH OF THAT LINE THE CUTOFF WOULD BE JUNE 30.

OTHER STATES LIKE SOUTH DAKOTA ALSO HAD DAMAGE, BUT EXPERTS DOUBT THEY'LL FOLLOW MINNESOTA'S LEAD.

Paul Johnson: One of the things is looking to backing the date even further to like June 15, June 20th or something like that. I don't think that would help South Dakota a bit.

JOHNSON SAYS EPA IS ALSO CONSIDERING CHANGES TO THE FEDERAL DICAMBA LABEL, BUT HE'S NOT SURE WHAT THE ADJUSTMENTS WILL BE OR IF THEY'LL COME BEFORE THE 2022 PLANTING SEASON.

SOUTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR KRISTI NOEM INCLUDED SOME LARGE INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN HER ANNUAL BUDGET.

STATE AG SECRETARY HUNTER ROBERTS SAYS THE LARGEST SHARE, 600-MILLION DOLLARS, WILL GO TOWARDS WATER PROJECTS. HE SAYS THE LACK OF WATER HAS BEEN A LIMITING FACTOR FOR MANY LARGER LIVESTOCK AND DAIRY OPERATIONS AND AG PROCESSING FACILITIES THAT ARE LOOKING TO BUILD IN THE STATE OR EXPAND.

Hunter Roberts: Put those dollars to long term benefit for the state. Certainly in rural South Dakota we're going to see a huge benefit from our rural water systems, being able to increase their maintenance and repair and then create additional opportunities for new hookups for users.

ROBERTS SAYS GOVERNOR NOEM IS ALSO DIRECTING 50-MILLION DOLLARS TO BROADBAND EXPANSION IN RURAL AREAS.

PLUS THE BUDGET INCLUDED FUNDING FOR TECH SCHOOLS LIKE MITCHELL TECH TO ADD PROGRAMS SUCH AS DIESEL MECHANICS.

SOUTH DAKOTA SENATOR MIKE ROUNDS SUBMITTED HARSH COMMENTS ON THE PROPOSED USDA FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE RULEMAKING ON ARTIFICIALLY PRODUCED PROTEIN PRODUCTS.

THE AGENCY'S PROPOSED RULE WOULD ALLOW TERMS SUCH AS "MEAT", "STEAK" OR "POULTRY" TO BE USED TO LABEL PROTEINS THAT ARE LAB OR CELL-CULTURED.

ROUNDS SAYS IT SENDS THE WRONG MESSAGE TO PRODUCERS AND CONSUMERS. HE HOPES USDA WILL MAKE THE NEEDED CHANGES TO PROVIDE TRANSPARENCY AND ACCURACY IN ITS LABELING OF CELL CULTURED FOODS, SO THEY CAN'T BE CONFUSED WITH TRADITIONAL MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS.

Sen. Mike Rounds: This is not meat, This is produced in a lab the cultures are made there. It's a protein product, but it doesn't deserve to have our United States Department of Ag call it meat or poultry.

THE RULE IS IN THE COMMENT PERIOD AND THE SENATOR HAS URGED USDA OFFICIALS TO MAKE THE NEEDED CHANGES BEFORE FINALIZING THE LABEL. HOWEVER, HE IS PREPARED TO OFFER LEGISLATION IF REQUIRED.

THE HOUSE PASSED LEGISLATION LAST WEEK TO EXTEND THE AUTHORIZATION OF THE LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING ACT THROUGH SEPTEMBER 20, 2022. THE BILL NOW MOVES TO THE SENATE.

GLENN MULLER WITH THE SOUTH DAKOTA PORK PRODUCERS COUNCIL SAYS THE REAUTHORIZATION IS CRITICAL BECAUSE IT IS AN IMPORTANT TOOL FOR ESTABLISHING PRICE. LIVESTOCK MANDATORY PRICE REPORTING GOT ANOTHER SHORT-TERM EXTENSION UNTIL FEBRUARY 18 UNDER THE CONTINUING RESOLUTION, BUT HE SAYS THE GOAL IS TO HAVE A LONG-TERM PROGRAM.

Glenn Muller: We've gone from extension to extension. We just need to have some long term results so we can have some stability in price discovery that's the main issue we'd like to have come from mandatory price reporting.

HOWEVER, HE SAYS REALISTICALLY A ONE YEAR EXTENSION MAY BE THE BEST HOPE FOR NOW. THEY WOULD LIKE CHANGES IN LMR SUCH AS REPORTING OF PRICE DISCOUNTS, PREMIUMS AND WHOLESALE CUTS. THEY ALSO WANT SWINE AND PORK MARKET FORMULA PURCHASES REPORTED SEPARATELY.

USDA ANNOUNCED 50- MILLION DOLLARS OF ADDITIONAL PANDEMIC ASSISTANCE FOR HOG PRODUCERS. \

ELIGIBLE PORK PRODUCERS SOLD THROUGH A NEGOTIATED SALE FROM APRIL 16 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 2020 AND SAW A REDUCTION IN MARKET PRICE DUE TO SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTIONS AT PACKING PLANTS TIED TO COVID. THE PAYMENT RATE IS 54-DOLLARS TIMES THE NUMBER OF HOGS, UP TO 10,000. SIGNUP RUNS DECEMBER 15th TO FEBRUARY 25th.

MINN-DAK SUGARBEET GROWERS GOT SOME GOOD NEWS AT THE CO-OP'S ANNUAL MEETING, AFTER SEVERAL DIFFICULT YEARS.

MINN-DAK CEO KURT WICKSTROM SAYS ALTHOUGH THE 2021 CROP STARTED OUT IN A DROUGHT, AUGUST RAINS REALLY BOOSTED TONNAGE, TO A RECORD-BREAKING 31 TONS PER ACRE.

THE CO-OP FORECAST AN INITIAL PAYMENT OF 44 DOLLARS A TON. THAT'S A 46 PERCENT INCREASE FROM LAST YEAR'S INITIAL PROJECTION.

IN ADDITION, WICKSTROM SAYS THE COMPANY HAS INVESTED ABOUT 26 MILLION DOLLARS IN THE PLANT OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS, AND NOW IT'S PAYING OFF.

Kurt Wickstrom: I THINK WHAT WE'RE ALL SEEING AND REALIZING IS THAT THE PLAN IS WORKING. THOSE INVESTMENTS ARE PAYING OFF, AND THE OPTIMISM AND THE COMMITMENT AND THE PRIDE IN THE CO-OP IS BACK, AND IT FEELS REALLY GOOD.

THE COMPANY EXPECTS TO PROCESS 2.8 MILLION TONS OF BEETS BY MAY.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL LOOK AT THE LATEST HIGH-TECH POTATO GRADING EQUIPMENT.

A FOURTH-GENERATION POTATO FARMING AND MARKETING FAMILY IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA IS LEAPING INTO A NEW ERA OF ELECTRONIC POTATO GRADING. MIKKEL PATES GIVES YOU A LOOK AT HOW IT WORKS, IN OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mikkel Pates: A SOPHISTICATED NEW PHOTOGRAPHIC GRADING SYSTEM IS ALLOWING THIS FAMILY TO USE THEIR LABOR MORE EFFECTIVELY.

Jackson Hall: I THINK THE BIG THING IS THEY'RE GENTLE ON PRODUCT.

THE HALL FAMILY OF HOOPLE, NORTH DAKOTA HAS BEEN IN THE COMMERCIAL POTATO BUSINESS SINCE THE 1930S. THE EXTENDED FAMILY, TODAY WITH SEVEN PARTNERS FROM TWO GENERATIONS, FARMS 6,500 ACRES. ROUGHLY FIFTEEN-HUNDRED ACRES OF THAT IS RED AND YELLOW POTATOES FOR THE FRESH MARKET. THIS FALL, THEY INSTALLED A MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR OPTICAL GRADING SYSTEM.

T.J. Hall: I WOULD SAY IT WAS A LITTLE SCARY TO BE THE ONE TO PULL THE, TO TAKE THAT JUMP OR TAKE THAT LEAP.

IT USES CAMERAS TO SORT POTATOES INDIVIDUALLY.

T.J. Hall: IT'S TAKING ABOUT 80 PICTURES PER POTATO.

SIMILAR SYSTEMS ARE USED FOR OTHER PRODUCE LIKE APPLES AND CHERRIES, BUT THIS IS THE ONLY ONE IN THE REGION FOR POTATOES, AND ONE OF THE VERY FEW OF THIS STYLE IN THE WORLD. IN FACT, THE SYSTEM IS SO NEW, THAT THERE WAS NO "GRADING MAP" FOR EVALUATING POTATOES.

9726 2:10 Jackson Hall: WE BASICALLY HAD TO TEACH THE MACHINE WHAT'S RED, WHAT'S YELLOW ON A YELLOW POTATO, WHAT'S GREEN, WHAT'S ROT. YOU KNOW WE HAD TO TEACH IT ALL THAT. BUT ONCE IT STARTS LEARNING IT, IT LEARNS QUICK AND IT DOES A GOOD JOB.

THE HALLS' "SPECTRIM" SYSTEM, MADE BY THE COMPAC-TOMRA COMPANIES, CAN SORT UP TO 1,700 POTATOES A MINUTE, OR ABOUT 120,000 PER HOUR. IT'S MUCH MORE ACCURATE AND EFFICIENT THAN THE OPTICAL SORTING SYSTEM THAT THEY INSTALLED ABOUT TEN YEARS AGO. PLUS, NEW SYSTEM ALSO WEIGHS AND SIZES THE POTATOES.

THE HALLS SAY THAT THEY LIKE TO KEEP UP WITH TECHNOLOGY.

Greg Hall: YOU'RE ALWAYS A LITTLE BIT APPREHENSIVE OF WHETHER IT'S ALL GOING TO WORK AND STUFF, BUT WE'RE HAPPY WITH THE WAY IT IS WORKING. IT'S JUST A STEP UP, AND IT'S BEEN PROGRESSIONS LIKE THAT ALL THROUGH THE YEARS, SINCE 1950.

SO IT'S A BIG INVESTMENT, BUT THE HALLS ARE BETTING ON TECHNOLOGY TO INCREASE QUALITY FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS IN THIS GENERATION AND THE NEXT. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT HOOPLE, NORTH DAKOTA.

COMPAC CUSTOM-DESIGNED AND BUILT THE MACHINE SPECIFICALLY TO FIT INTO THE HALL'S EXISTING BUILDING.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR AT AGWEEK.COM..

DESPITE DROUGHT IN SOUTH DAKOTA THIS YEAR, THE WINNER OF THE STATE SOYBEAN YIELD CONTEST CRUSHED THE PREVIOUS RECORD.

The winner was Kory Standy of Charles Mix County with a record 118.48 bushels per acre which he credits to his fertility program.

Kory Standy: I grid sampled here five years ago and I've been going every year I've been going getting my poorer spots, I've been trying to get them all up to snuff now.

His irrigated beans were planted in 30 inch rows. He says they were chest high but never lodged.

Standy: We never had no big winds or anything and with my subsurface irrigation I got to apply all the water and my micronutrients. I get them all applied in a good time.

Tonya Standy was runner up with a yield of 108.82. And the contest also recognizes high quality.

Deinert: We can kind of determine okay, what kind of soybeans are we raising in South Dakota? Are they high protein, are they high oils? And so we can use that information to best market our state.

CATTLE PRODUCERS MAY SOON HAVE ANOTHER FEED OPTION AS NDSU RESEARCHERS ARE STUDYING FEEDING HEMP SEED CAKE TO LIVESTOCK, PARTICULARLY CATTLE.

TWO EXPERIMENTS LOOKED INTO THE FEED. ONE TESTED GROWTH, IN WHICH HEMP SEED CAKE WAS COMPARED TO DISTILLERS GRAIN. WHILE DAILY GROWTH WAS SLIGHTLY LOWER WITH THE HEMP, THERE WERE SOME NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS.

ANIMAL SCIENCES PROFESSOR KENDALL SWANSON SAYS HEMP APPEARS TO BE A GOOD PROTEIN SOURCE FOR CATTLE, AND HE SAYS THERE MAY BE OTHER BIO-ACTIVE BENEFITS..

THE HEMP SEED CAKES ARE PRODUCED FROM THE MEAL THAT'S LEFT AFTER CBD OIL IS SQUEEZED OUT OF THE HEMP, SO SWANSON SAYS THEY'RE RESEARCHING WHETHER THAT HAS ANY EFFECT ON THE CATTLE.

Kendall Swanson: BECAUSE OF ITS POTENTIAL EFFECTS WITH CBD AND THINGS, THERE ARE SOME SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR APPROVAL, THAT IT NEEDS TO BE SHOWN THAT IT'S SAFE TO FEED THESE PRODUCTS.>

SWANSON SAYS LEGALIZING HEMP SEED PRODUCTS FOR FEED COULD BE A BIG BENEFIT FOR BOTH LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS, AND HEMP GROWERS.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL MEET A SOUTHERN TRANSPLANT WHO'S HELPING TO STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA...

SOME RARE DECEMBER WEATHER EVENTS TOOK PLACE THIS WEEK IN OUR REGION. WILL THE REST OF THE MONTH AND YEAR CONTINUE TO BE VOLATILE?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

IT'S ELECTION TIME AGAIN FOR THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL.

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL IS HOLDING ELECTIONS IN THE SEVEN COUNTIES IN DISTRICTS ONE, FIVE, SEVEN AND NINE. NOMINATION FORMS HAVE BEEN MAILED TO SOYBEAN GROWERS IN THOSE COUNTIES.

SOYBEAN COUNCIL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR STEPHANIE SINNER SAYS THE BOARD'S WORK NOW, IS FOR THE FUTURE OF THE SOYBEAN INDUSTRY.

Stephanie Sinner: SO IT'S REALLY LOOKING FOR THE PEOPLE THAT ARE THINKING FORWARD, AND THINKING ABOUT WHAT DO WE DO TODAY THAT IT'S GOING TO MAKE A LASTING IMPACT FOR THE NEXT GENERATION. AND THAT'S WHAT I THINK IS EXCITING ABOUT CONSIDERING BEING ON THE BOARD.

NDSU EXTENSION'S AG AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIRECTOR SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT THAT SOYBEAN PRODUCERS STAY ENGAGED IN THE PROCESS. THEY HELP DECIDE HOW MILLIONS OF CHECKOFF DOLLARS WILL BE SPENT.

Charlie Stoltenow: IT'S ABOUT THE INDUSTRY, AND HOW DO WE FEED A PLANET THAT'S GETTING HUNGRIER EVERY DAY. HOW DO WE DO THAT, HOW DO WE KEEP OURSELVES SUSTAINABLE? HOW DO WE STAY IN BUSINESS? AND SO WHEN YOU'RE THINKING ABOUT THESE THINGS, REALLY, DON'T THINK ABOUT YOURSELF, THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR INDUSTRY.

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT NOMINATING YOURSELF OR ANOTHER GROWER, GO TO THE WEBSITE ON YOUR SCREEN.

NORTH DAKOTA'S RURAL COMMUNITIES OFFER LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES, AND ONE WAY TO GROW IS BY ATTRACTING MORE PEOPLE FROM OTHER STATES.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN TALKED WITH A SOUTHERN WOMAN WHO'S MAKING HERSELF AT HOME IN HARVEY.

Kathey Medlin Keller: IT'S TOTALLY DIFFERENT THAN WHAT I WAS USED TO, IT REALLY IS. AND I LOVE IT, I LOVE IT HERE.

KATHEY MEDLIN KELLER WAS RAISED IN OKLAHOMA, EVENTUALLY MOVING TO OREGON FOR HER WORK IN I-T. THAT'S WHERE SHE MET HER HUSBAND TIM, A HARVEY NATIVE. BUT NINE YEARS AGO, AS THAT AREA GREW MORE POPULOUS, THEY DECIDED TO MOVE BACK TO HARVEY, TO TAKE CARE OF TIM'S PARENTS.

KATHEY BOUGHT THE PERFECT PETALS FLOWER SHOP IN 2013, SHORTLY AFTER MOVING TO HARVEY.

they're beautiful

SHE'S EXPANDED THE BUSINESS INTO ADJACENT BUILDINGS, BUT HAS A HARD TIME FINDING EMPLOYEES.

SO SHE'S OFTEN RECRUITING PEOPLE TO MOVE TO HARVEY.

Kathey Medlin Keller: TIM AND I BOTH HAVE TRIED TO GET SEVERAL PEOPLE THAT WE WORKED WITH TO COME HERE AND BUY BUSINESSES AND JUST START A NEW LIFE. PEOPLE HELP EACH OTHER. THAT IS TO ME AN AMAZING THING. EVERYBODY JUST PULLS TOGETHER.

TIM FOUND THAT WHILE SOME THINGS HAD CHANGED BACK HOME, SOME THINGS HADN'T.

Tim Keller: A LOT OF THE SMALL TOWN COMMUNITY VALUES ARE STILL THE SAME, PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE.

WHILE THE COLD AND SNOWY WINTERS DIDN'T PHASE KATHEY, SHE HAD A LITTLE TROUBLE WITH WHAT YOU MIGHT CALL A LANGUAGE BARRIER.

Kathey Medlin Keller: WHEN I FIRST CAME HERE AND I MET TIM'S MOM AND DAD, THEY BOTH HAD EXTREMELY STRONG GERMAN ACCENTS AND I COULD NOT UNDERSTAND THEM. THEY COULDN'T UNDERSTAND MY SOUTHERN ACCENT, SO IT WAS KIND OF FUNNY.

Lisa Goodman: IF YOU WANT THOSE THINGS IN YOUR COMMUNITY, YOU HAVE TO SUPPORT THEM AND YOU HAVE TO BE INVOLVED.

LISA GOODMAN IS HERSELF A TRANSPLANT, FROM WISCONSIN, AFTER MARRYING A LOCAL FARMER. SHE WORKS AS A FINANCIAL PROFESSIONAL, BUT HAS ALSO BECOME INVOLVED IN A NUMBER OF COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES IN HARVEY AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.

Lisa Goodman: YOUR RURAL COMMUNITIES ARE A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE, THEY HAVE A LOT TO OFFER AND I THINK PEOPLE JUST NEED TO KIND OF OPEN THEIR EYES AND REALIZE THAT THERE'S A LOT TO OFFER IN THESE SMALL COMMUNITIES.

KATHEY SAYS SHE FINDS A LOT TO LIKE HERE, AND HAS NO PLANS TO LEAVE.

Kathey Medlin Keller: WITHIN SIX MONTHS I FELT LIKE I WAS AT HOME.

SO YEAH, IT FEELS PRETTY MUCH LIKE HOME.

IN HARVEY, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM.

STILL AHEAD, SOME MINNESOTANS GET A TASTE OF LOCAL TREATS AT THE ANNUAL HOLIDAY FEAST.

JUST IN TIME FOR HOLIDAY FEASTING, AN ANNUAL FEAST HIGHLIGHTS LOCAL FOODS IN SOUTHERN MINNESOTA.

THE EIGHTH ANNUAL LOCAL FOODS MARKETPLACE HIGHLIGHTS THE UNIQUE FLAVORS OF THE REGION, AND SUPPORTING THE AREA'S FARMS AND FOOD BUSINESSES.

THE MARKET FEATURED LOCALLY MADE ITEMS, INCLUDING CHEESES, MEATS, HONEY, SPICES, JAMS AND CHOCOLATES AS WELL AS BEER, WINE AND CIDER. FEAST FOUNDER TIM PENNY SAYS MORE AND MORE PEOPLE WANT LOCAL FOODS.

Tim Penny: AND THEN WE DECIDED TO POOL TOGETHER AND PULL OFF THIS ANNUAL FEAST FESTIVAL, WHICH IS LIKE A FARMERS MARKET ON STEROIDS, IN ORDER TO DRAW MORE ATTENTION TO ALL OF THE EXCITING LOCAL FOODS THAT ARE BEING PRODUCED AND PROCESSED HERE IN RURAL MINNESOTA.

THE MARKET IS SUPPORTED BY SEVERAL BUSINESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS, INCLUDING THE MINNESOTA AG DEPARTMENT AND U OF M EXTENSION.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK.

SIX AG ORGANIZATIONS HAVE JOINED FORCES TO DEFRAY SOME OF THE COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH WETLANDS MITIGATION.

AND WHAT'S THE LATEST WITH THE AQUACULTURE INDUSTRY IN MINNESOTA?

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.