Coming up on AgweekTV, we will discuss the EPA proposing regulations that could be detrimental for agriculture. We will visit the U.S. Canadian border and see how ag inspectors keep an eye out for noxious weeds and pests. We will see a small town café that is making a big difference in the farming community. Finally, we will continue sharing why we are thankful for ag.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

EPA HAS ANOTHER BUSY WEEK PROPOSING REGULATIONS DETRIMENTAL FOR AGRICULTURE.

Jeff Beach: I'M JEFF BEACH. I'LL TELL YOU ABOUT HOW AG INSPECTORS KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR NOXIOUS WEEDS AND PESTS AT THE U.S. CANADIAN BORDER.

Ann Bailey: I'M ANN BAILEY. I'LL TELL YOU ABOUT A SMALL TOWN CAFE THAT'S MAKING A BIG DIFFERENCE IN THE FARMING COMMUNITY.

Newsletter signup for email alerts

AND WE CONTINUE TO SHARE THE REASONS WE'RE THANKFUL FOR AG.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE HOUSE PASSED THE BUILD BACK BETTER ACT BEFORE RECESSING FOR THE THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY. IT NOW MOVES TO THE SENATE WHERE REPUBLICANS ARE HOPING TO BLOCK THE LEGISLATION.

INCLUDING SENATOR JOHN THUNE, WHO TOLD SOUTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU MEMBERS HE'S CONCERNED THE ADDITIONAL SPENDING WILL FURTHER INCREASE INFLATION AND THE COST OF PRODUCTION FOR AGRICULTURE.

THE BILL ALLOCATES MORE THAN 87-BILLION DOLLARS IN TOTAL AG SPENDING OVER THE NEXT TEN YEARS....INCLUDING 28-BILLION FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS, 18-BILLION FOR RURAL DEVELOPMENT, 12- BILLION FOR FARM DEBT RELIEF AND 2-BILLION FOR RESEARCH. THUNE SAYS THIS SETS A DANGEROUS PRECEDENT FOR THE NEXT FARM BILL.

Sen. John Thune When you're spending that kind of money and doing it on their agenda and not in the areas where typically we would be spending resources in a farm bill it's really going to affect I think the way that we allocate resources in the next farm bill.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HAS KICKED THE CAN DOWN THE ROAD AGAIN WITH A DELAY IN THE RENEWABLE VOLUME OBLIGATIONS IN THE RENEWABLE FUELS STANDARD.

THE AGENCY IS PROPOSING AN EXTENSION ON THE 2019 THROUGH 2021 COMPLIANCE AND VOLUME DEADLINES ON RVO'S, BUT GAVE NO REASON WHY.

BIOFUELS GROUPS ARE OUTRAGED AND SAY IT'S PURELY POLITICAL.

Brian Jennings: We're already way late for 2021. We're behind schedule considerably for the 2022 volumes under the RFS. And there's just a growing sense of frustration.

INDUSTRY LEADERS ARE ALSO CONCERNED THE AGENCY WILL RETROACTIVELY ADJUST THE VOLUMES FOR YEARS LIKE 2020.

THE EPA RELEASED A PROPOSED RULE TO REPLACE THE NAVIGABLE WATERS PROTECTION RULE. IT WOULD RE-ESTABLISH THE PRE-2015 DEFINITION OF WATERS OF THE U.S.

SOUTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU PRESIDENT SCOTT VANDERWAL SAYS HIS GROUP IS DISAPPOINTED THE AGENCY IS RETURNING TO AN OVERLY COMPLICATED INTERIM WATER RULE. HE SAYS IT ALSO REPRESENTS FEDERAL REGULATORY OVERREACH.

Scott VanderWal: The federal government does not have the authority to overreach state's rights on these water issues and to come down and try to regulate ephemeral waters and temporary streams.

THE LANGUAGE ALSO CREATED MAJOR PERMIT BACKLOGS FOR THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WHICH RESULTS IN LONG DELAYS FOR FARMERS AND RANCHERS WORKING HARD TO KEEP AMERICA FED.

SOUTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU HELD THEIR 104TH ANNUAL CONVENTION IN SIOUX FALLS LAST WEEK.

MEMBERS PASSED RESOLUTIONS REGARDING PROPERTY TAX CHANGES FOCUSED ON RANGELAND VALUATIONS, PLUS SOME NEEDED REFORM OF IMMIGRATION POLICY DUE TO THE AG LABOR CRISIS.

Jeff Gadske: But ag labor, you need those workers to come and help you out throughout that from other countries and stuff. I mean you got a lot of Mexican and South African people to come work for you. We need to get them here, get them here the right way.

FARM BUREAU MEMBERS ARE ALREADY STARTING TO WORK ON RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE 2023 FARM BILL. THOSE IDEAS WILL GO ON TO THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU'S FARM BILL WORKING GROUP WHICH WILL HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE FROM EVERY STATE INCLUDING SOUTH DAKOTA. \u0009\u0009\u0009

ATTENDEES ALSO GOT AN UPDATE ON THE NEW SOUTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU HEALTH PLAN.

A FARMER FROM ASHLEY, NORTH DAKOTA IS JAILED IN UKRAINE. KURT GROZHANS IS ACCUSED OF HIRING A HIT-MAN TO ASSASSINATE THE COUNTRY'S AGRICULTURE MINISTER. IT COMES AFTER GROZHANS CLAIMED THAT THE MAN EMBEZZLED FROM HIS FARMING BUSINESS IN UKRAINE.

NICK BROADWAY HAS MORE.

Kurt Grozhans raised cattle and produced grains at his family farm in Ashley. His sisters tell me, in the year 2000, he traveled to Ukraine, to explore his family heritage, discovering it's farmable land.

KRISTI: He would share photos with us from time to time of his crops.

Kurt developed a passion for farming its land, joining forces with a man named Roman Leshchenko at around 2017. Kurt made Leshchenko the director of their Ukrainian farming business -- then days later, Leshchenko is said to have started transferring money from the company. Kurt accuses him of embezzling 250-thousand dollars, along with stealing grain -- starting a months long legal process detailed in *his* blog post where he calls himself a "deceived American investor." He accuses Leshchenko of making a large contribution to Vladamir Zelensky's presidential campaign in Ukraine, eventually becoming Ukraine's agricultural minister. Groszhans' post says he spent years suing Roman Leshchenko, while judges delayed his case, claiming they said "you should understand who you're suing."

KIMBERLY: He showed me on his app that this Roman said that he was going to have him thrown in jail.

Foreign news agencies are reporting, Kurt Groszhans is in jail -- accused of hiring a hit man to go after Leshchenko. His family says this is something he would never do. Now they're spending overnights getting in touch with the embassy and with our local delegation to get him back.

KIMBERLY: We love him and we believe in him and we want him to come home.

KRISTI: Do everything we can to keep fighting to bring him home safely.

THEY'VE SET UP AN EMAIL FOR ANYONE WITH INFORMATION OR ANY WAY TO HELP: FREEDOMFORKURT@GMAIL.COM.

DANGEROUS AND DESTRUCTIVE HITCHHIKERS CAN BE COMING INTO THE U.S. ON TRUCKS OR SHIPPING CONTAINERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD. BUT THANKS TO AG SPECIALISTS WITH THE U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, MANY OF THESE PESTS AND NOXIOUS WEEDS ARE STOPPED BEFORE THEY GET INTO THE U.S.

JEFF BEACH VISITED THE PORT OF ENTRY AT PEMBINA, NORTH DAKOTA, TO SEE HOW OFFICERS FIND AND STOP THESE HARMFUL INVADERS. IT'S OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Neil Halley: WE LOOK FOR ANYTHING THAT WILL HARBOR PESTS OR DISEASE, OR THE FEDERAL NOXIOUS WEEDS.

NEIL HALLEY IS AN AG SPECIALIST WITH CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION AT PEMBINA. THEY CHECK SHIPMENTS, AND FIND RESTRICTED ITEMS SEVERAL TIMES A WEEK.

Neil Halley: WE LOOK AT ANIMAL PRODUCTS, WE LOOK AT MEAT AND MEAT BYPRODUCTS. PRODUCTS GOING FOR PET FOOD. WE LOOK AT SEED. WE SEE A LOT OF POTATOES COMING THROUGH HERE FOR PROCESSING.

Jeff Beach: THE AG INSPECTORS WORK IN TANDEM WITH THE USDA. THEY INSPECT THE LIVESTOCK HERE AT THE BORDER.

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF CONTAINERS COME BY RAIL AND TRUCK THROUGH PEMBINA, PORTAL, NORTH DAKOTA AND INTERNATIONAL FALLS, MINNESOTA FROM CANADA EVERY YEAR. PEMBINA'S ASSISTANT PORT DIRECTOR SAYS THEY HAVE TO MAKE SURE THERE'S NOTHING COMING THROUGH THAT COULD HARM AMERICAN CROPS OR LIVESTOCK, BUT WITHOUT SLOWING THE BUSINESS OF COMMERCE.

Christopher Misson: WE'VE GOT TO KEEP COMMERCIAL FREIGHT MOVING, BUT WE'VE GOT TO DO THE BEST WE CAN TO MAKE SURE THAT WE'RE NOT GETTING BEAT.

EVERY LOAD IS SCANNED, AND SOMETIMES THEY FIND OTHER THINGS, LIKE WHEN AN OFFICER NOTICED SOMETHING ODD LAST SPRING.

Christopher Misson: THREE QUARTERS OF THE LOAD WAS HAY, THEY NOTICED AN ANOMALY IN THE BACK THIRD OF THE LOAD, SO THEY BACKED IT IN FOR AN INSPECT, AND SO IT WAS HAY, AND THEN MARIJUANA, AND THEN HAY.

IF SOMETHING SUSPICIOUS IS FOUND, THE SHIPMENT IS HELD AT THE BORDER UNTIL IT CAN BE AT VERIFIED. THE INSPECTORS SAY IT'S A HIGH PRIORITY TO FIND PESTS AND WEEDS THAT CAN CAUSE DAMAGE, OR DESTRUCTION TO AMERICAN CROPS AND LIVESTOCK. IN PEMBINA,NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS JEFF BEACH FOR AGWEEK.

COMING UP, AS WE CONTINUE OUR LOOK AT ALL THE WAYS WE'RE THANKFUL FOR AG...

Jenny Schlecht: WE'LL TALK TO A NORTH DAKOTA FARMER WHO'S THANKFUL FOR THE CHANCE TO EXPERIMENT.

A NEW BUILDING COMPLEX AT NDSU WILL MERGE SEVERAL AG PROGRAMS INTO ONE SITE, MAKING IT A RESEARCH POWERHOUSE.

THE "PELTIER COMPLEX" WILL BE NDSU'S LARGEST ACADEMIC FACILITY. IT'S NAMED FOR ONE OF THE REGION'S BIGGEST AG SUPPORTERS, THE LATE JOE PELTIER.

THE 85-MILLION DOLLAR PROJECT WILL JOIN NDSU'S FOOD, MEAT AND CEREAL SCIENCE LABS, ALONG WITH THE NORTHERN CROPS INSTITUTE.

Gov. Doug Burgum: IT GIVES A CHANCE FOR ALL OF NORTH DAKOTA CROPS TO HAVE EVEN MORE VALUE FOR THE PRODUCERS, AND SOLVE REAL PROBLEMS FOR CITIZENS ALL OVER THE WORLD.

Keith Peltier: IF SOMEBODY COMES IN HERE AND SEES THIS KIND OF FACILITY AND SAYS, YOU KNOW THESE GUYS NOT ONLY HAVE WORLD CLASS PRODUCTS, THEY HAVE WORLD CLASS FACILITIES, WE'RE GOING TO BUY SOME MORE FROM THEM. SO I THINK IT'S A TREMENDOUS AID IN RECRUITING AND IN PROMOTING, IT'S JUST GOING TO BE A FANTASTIC FOR THE STATE.

NDSU'S VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS SAYS IT WILL BE UNIQUE IN THE WORLD, AND THE WORK DONE AT THE FACILITY WILL ADD VALUE TO THE REGION'S CROPS AND LIVESTOCK.

Greg Lardy: IT'S REALLY A FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLABORATION BETWEEN OUR GROUPS, AND TO BRING IN THAT TRADE COMPONENT WITH THE N.C.I. AND THE TRADE OFFICE IS REALLY GOING TO PAY DIVIDENDS FOR THE REGION.

THE PELTIER COMPLEX IS EXPECTED TO BE COMPLETED BY 2024.

AG RESEARCH IS VITALLY IMPORTANT TO KEEPING IMPROVING FARMING PRACTICES, WHILE TAKING CARE OF OUR NATURAL RESOURCES.

JENNY SCHLECHT TALKED TO ONE GROWER WHO IS THANKFUL FOR SOIL HEALTH RESEARCH.

Jenny Schlecht: WHEN JASON STRAND CAME BACK TO HIS HOME FARM IN ELLENDALE, NORTH DAKOTA, HE KNEW HE WANTED TO USE THE FIELD NEXT TO HIS HOUSE TO DO SOMETHING A LITTLE DIFFERENT.

Jason Strand: THE LONG TERM IS TO KEEP DOING WHATEVER I CAN TO IMPROVE THE SOIL HEALTH ON THIS AND INCREASE THE BIOLOGICAL POPULATIONS AND GIVE FARMERS IN THE AREA SOMETHING TO SEE FIRST HAND.

STRAND IS USING THIS FIELD TO TRY DIFFERENT REGENERATIVE PRACTICES THAT WILL ALSO ALLOW HIM TO HAVE NEIGHBORS GRAZE ON THE FIELD.

Jason Strand: SO ON THE SIXTY ACRES THIS YEAR I PLANTED CORN WITH WHAT EQUATES TO A FORTY INCH ROW SPACING, SO I COULD INTERSEED AT THE B FOUR AND GET SOME COVER CROPS GROWING, SO I HAVE SOMETHING THIS FALL FOR CATTLE TO GRAZE ON.

DARRELL OSWALD, THE MANAGER OF THE BURLEIGH COUNTY SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT'S MENOKEN FARM APPRECIATES STRAND'S EFFORTS.

Darrell Oswald: WE'RE PLEASED THAT FARMERS AND RANCHERS AND AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS HAVE EMBRACED SOME OF THE THINGS THAT WE STUDY HERE AT THE FARM. BUT AGAIN, THE NEED FOR OTHER DEMONSTRATION FARMS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, AND ACROSS NORTH DAKOTA, IS EVIDENT.

Jenny Schlecht: OSWALD SAYS PEOPLE LIKE STRAND USING THE KNOWLEDGE THAT COMES FROM PLACES LIKE MENOKEN FARMS, IN PLACES WITHOUT DEMONSTRATION FARMS, ALLOWS THAT KNOWLEDGE TO SPREAD TO NEW AREAS.

Darrell Oswald: HOW EXCITING A TIME IT IS IN AGRICULTURE, AND I'M THANKFUL FOR THAT.

NEAR ELLENDALE, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS JENNY SCHLECHT FOR AGWEEK.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL MEET FOLKS IN A SMALL TOWN WHO ARE THANKFUL THEIR ONLY CAFE HAS REOPENED..

WITH THE EXCEPTION OF SOME TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS, ITS BEEN A FAIRLY QUIET WEATHER PATTERN THIS MONTH. WILL THAT CONTINUE?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

MANY PEOPLE IN REYNOLDS, NORTH DAKOTA ARE THANKFUL THAT SOME FARMERS STEPPED UP TO BUY THEIR CAFE LAST YEAR.

IT HAD BEEN CLOSED FOR MORE THAN A YEAR, BUT RECENTLY REOPENED. ANN BAILEY STOPPED IN TO SEE WHAT IT MEANS TO THE COMMUNITY.

Kevin Leddige: DEFINITELY A HOLE IN THE COMMUNITY THAT, YOU KNOW, EVERYBODY MISSED.

Ann Bailey: AFTER A YEARLONG CLOSURE, THE BEEHIVE CAFE IS BACK IN BUSINESS AND BUZZING WITH ACTIVITY.

HE'S SUPPOSED TO ASK YOU A QUESTION.

Bruce Kulseth: IT WAS DIFFERENT FOR US WHEN IT FIRST CLOSED, WE KIND OF WERE LOST, DIDN'T KNOW WHAT TO DO.

THE SMALL TOWN CAFE IS KIND OF THE COMMUNITY HUB, WHERE PEOPLE NURTURE FRIENDSHIPS OVER FOOD.

Ann: How's the food?

Kevin: EXCELLENT.

THE COMMUNITY MISSED ITS BAR AND CAFE, SO LAST YEAR THREE AREA FARMERS BOUGHT IT. IT REOPENED IN SEPTEMBER 2021, AFTER SOME REMODELING.

NEW MANAGERS MIKE AND DAWN MONETTE SAY THEY'RE PLEASED WITH THE RESPONSE FROM THE COMMUNITY.

Mike Monette: AMAZING. REALLY GOOD. THEY'RE VERY HAPPY AND APPRECIATIVE YOU'D SAY I GUESS THAT THERE'S FINALLY FOOD BACK IN REYNOLDS.

egg bake or sausage and eggs.

Dawn Monette: YOU HAVE TO PAY ATTENTION TO THE COMMUNITY, AND WHAT THEY WANT, AND THAT'S WHY I ALWAYS LIKE TO ASK FOR SUGGESTIONS.

Thank you. you had eggs.

MANY OF THIS GROUP OF GUYS HAVE BEEN COMING HERE SINCE THE 70'S, MOSTLY ON SATURDAY MORNINGS. AND IT'S NOT JUST THE FOOD THEY COME FOR.

Steve Walen: YOU TALK TO THE NEIGHBORS AND YOU HEAR A BUNCH OF GOSSIP FOR THE WEEK OR SO.

GERALD SEIG HAS BEEN COMING TO THE CAFE FOR SOME FIFTY YEARS, BACK TO WHEN IT WAS AT ANOTHER LOCATION ACROSS THE STREET. HE SAYS OVER THE YEARS, THE GROUP, AND THE FRIENDSHIPS AROUND THE TABLE, HAVE GROWN.

Gerald Sieg: IT'S NICE TO HAVE A CAFE IN TOWN AND HAVE A PLACE TO COME AND VISIT AND EXCHANGE IDEAS AND LISTEN TO EVERYBODY TALK AND NOBODY KNOWS WHAT THEY'RE TALKING ABOUT

How is it everyone? Very good.

IN REYNOLDS, NORTH DAKOTA,THIS IS ANN BAILEY FOR AGWEEK.

THOUSANDS OF IMMIGRANTS IN THE ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA AREA ARE THANKFUL FOR A COMMUNITY EFFORT THAT HELPS THEM GROW FOODS FROM THEIR HOMELANDS THAT THEY MAY NOT BE ABLE TO GET, OR AFFORD, HERE.

NOAH FISH HAS MORE ON "THE VILLAGE" PROJECT.

KIM SIN CAME TO THE U.S. AS A CHILD IN 1983. A FEW YEARS AGO, WHEN HE WAS WORKING WITH ELDERLY, HE DISCOVERED MANY WEREN'T ABLE TO AFFORD HEALTHY FOOD, OR FIND AFFORDABLE FOOD FROM THEIR CULTURE OUT OF SEASON. HE WAS INSPIRED BY THE HMONG AMERICAN FARMERS ASSOCIATION, TO TRY SOMETHING SIMILAR FOR CAMBODIANS, AND OTHER IMMIGRANTS, IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA.

Kim Sin: YU KNOW, I NEVER IMAGINED IT WOULD BE SO SUCCESSFUL. IT'S A COMMUNITY EFFORT TO MAKE THE VILLAGE TO GET TO WHERE WE ARE TODAY.

THE VILLAGE AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE NOW HAS FOUR SITES WHERE THEY GROW FOOD, AND THEY'RE DEVELOPNIG TWO MORE. THEY USE A COMBINATION OF RENTED AND DONATED FARMLAND.

Amanda Nigon-Crowley: I THINK AS LONG AS WE HAVE A WAITING LIST, AND AS LONG AS WE HAVE PEOPLE WHO WANT TO GROW THEIR OWN FOOD WE'RE GOING TO KEEP LOOKING FOR LAND AND KEEP TRYING TO EXPAND. WERE ALSO TRYING TO FIND THE FARMERS OF TOMORROW AND EDUCATE PEOPLE ON REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE.

SIN SAYS IT FEELS GOOD GETTING BACK TO HIS ROOTS,

Kim Sin: THIS IS WHAT OUR CULTURE WAS, YOU KNOW, RAISED TO DO, IS CULTIVATING AND FARMING. AND WHEN WE CAME TO THE U.S. WE DIDN'T HAVE THAT OPPORTUNITY.

SIXTEEN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES AND COUNTLESS DIALECTS, WORKING TOGETHER TO GROW FRESH AND HEALTHY FOOD. IN ROCESTER, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

STILL AHEAD, THE CALENDAR MAY SAY WINTER, BUT IT'S TIME TO THINK ABOUT NEXT YEAR'S GARDEN.

NOW THAT THE WEATHER HAS TURNED COLDER, IT'S TIME TO START THINKING ABOUT YOUR GARDEN!

CRISTEN CLARK SAYS IT CAN TAKE LOTS OF PLANNING TO GET THE GARDEN YOU WANT. CLARK WRITES A MONTHLY "FOOD AND SWINE" COLUMN IN AGWEEK MAGAZINE, AND SHARES VIDEOS ON AGWEEK.COM.

THIS WEEK, SHE SHARES HOW HER GARDEN IS EVOLVING FROM VEGGIES TO FLOWERS. GO TO AGWEEK.COM TO CHECK IT OUT.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM. YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.