Coming up on AgweekTV, we will discuss soybean farmers teaming up with Goodyear to roll out tires made with soybean oil. We will see a North Dakota co-op make history as it loads the longest unit train in the United States. Finally, we will take a look at the crop size in the November WASDE Report.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

SOYBEAN FARMERS TEAM UP WITH GOODYEAR TO ROLL OUT TIRES MADE WITH SOYBEAN OIL.

Ann Bailey: A NORTH DAKOTA CO-OP IS MAKING HISTORY AS IT LOADS THE LONGEST UNIT TRAIN IN THE UNITED STATES.

AND AFTER A CHALLENGING SEASON, WE'LL LOOK AT THE CROP SIZE IN THE NOVEMBER WASDE REPORT.

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WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

CONGRESS FINALLY PASSED THE INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND AND JOBS ACT. THE BILL SPENDS 1.2 TRILLION DOLLARS OVER EIGHT YEARS AND IS ONE OF THE LARGEST INVESTMENTS IN INFRASTRUCTURE IN U.S. HISTORY.

AGRICULTURE WILL GAIN FROM:

110-BILLION DOLLARS FOR ROADS AND BRIDGES, 66- BILLION F0R RAIL IMPROVEMENTS, 65- BILLION DOLLARS IN BROADBAND INVESTMENTS, 47 BILLION IN CYBERSECURITY AND MITIGATION OF DROUGHT AND FLOODS, PLUS PORTS AND WATERWAYS RECEIVE OVER 17-BILLION.

THERE ARE ALSO UPDATES IN HOURS OF SERVICE FOR TRUCKERS AND A BIOBASED PILOT PROGRAM.

FARM GROUPS GENERALLY SUPPORTED THE PACKAGE.

SEVEN MIDWESTERN GOVERNORS ARE ASKING EPA TO CREATE A NEW RULE TO ALLOW YEAR-ROUND SALES OF E15 AND WANT IT IN PLACE BY THE NEXT DRIVING SEASON.

A FEDERAL COURT VACATED THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION RULE THAT ALLOWED THOSE SALES. GOVERNOR'S INCLUDING SOUTH DAKOTA'S KRISTI NOEM, TOLD EPA UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT THE ADMINISTRATOR HAS THE AUTHORITY TO WRITE REGULATIONS THAT PUT E15 ON EQUAL FOOTING WITH E10 REGARDING VOLATILITY AT A GOVERNOR'S REQUEST. IF GRANTED, THE RECENT COURT DECISION WOULD NOT RESTRICT RETAILERS IN THOSE STATES FROM SELLING E15 YEAR-ROUND.

Kristi Noem: I think we're in there to compete and we'll fill up the space for that energy demand if given the opportunity for a level playing field and that's what we've always advocated for.

THE EPA ADMINISTRATOR MUST PROMULGATE RULES ENACTING A REQUEST WITHIN 90 DAYS OF NOTIFICATION FROM A GOVERNOR. SOME STATES HAVE ALREADY SECURED WAIVERS.

THE NOVEMBER WASDE REPORT WAS NEUTRAL TO EVEN FRIENDLY FOR SOYBEANS.

USDA LOWERED BEAN YIELD .3 BUSHELS AND PRODUCTION BY 23 MILLION. BUT LOWER EXPORTS RESULTED IN A 20 MILLION BUSHEL INCREASE IN CARRYOUT. ,

CORN YIELD WAS RAISED TO A RECORD 177 BUSHELS PER ACRE WHICH INCREASED PRODUCTION 43 MILLION BUSHELS, BUT ENDING STOCKS WERE TRIMMED SLIGHTLY WITH INCREASED CORN FOR ETHANOL.

AND U.S. WHEAT ENDING STOCKS ARE STILL AT 14 YEAR LOWS AND GLOBAL STOCKS WERE LOWERED ANOTHER 1.4 MILLION METRIC TONS.

Joining us for analysis is Luke Swenson. Luke, probably the biggest surprise of the report was lower yield on soybeans, but it was kind of offset here by the slow export pace. Do you see that export pace continuing to be slow?

Luke Swenson: I THINK IT'S GOING TO SUSTAIN. I MEAN, EVERYONE WAS OBVIOUSLY LOOKING FOR THE INCREASE IN YIELD ON BEANS MORE SO THAN CORN, I THINK WE WERE EVEN LOOKING AT THE SAME. SO IT DIDN'T SURPRISE EVERYONE. IT MAKES SENSE THE WAY THEY JOCKEY AROUND NUMBERS.

LUKE, CHINA IS ABOUT, I DON'T KNOW, THIRTY SIX PERCENT BEHIND WHERE THEY WERE LAST YEAR FOR SOYBEAN EXPORTS AT THIS TIME. CAN WE GET CAUGHT UP?

Luke Swenson: THEY CAN, I THINK IT'S GOING TO NEED A, YOU'RE GOING TO NEED A PRODUCTION ISSUE IN SOUTH AMERICA FOR THEM TO COME IN AND BID FOR THAT, BECAUSE WHEN WE'RE LOOKING AT STOCKS WHERE WE ARE IT'S GOING TO BE HARD FOR THEM TO CLOSE THAT GAP. I MEAN, THE USDA HAD US DOWN TEN PERCENT AT THIS TIME AND WE'RE DOWN, IT'S LIKE YEAH, THIRTY FOUR. I DON'T THINK THEY'RE GOING TO NECESSARILY CLOSE IT, BUT THE QUESTION IS, WE'RE SETTING RECORD CRUSH PACES HERE, YOU'VE GOT NEW PLANTS COMING UP IN THE NEXT TWO YEARS EVERYWHERE. I THINK WE'RE DOMESTICALLY GOING TO BE A LEADER, AND CHINA'S GOING TO SUPPORT, MORE THAN THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

SPECIFICALLY ON CORN, WE DID HAVE RECORD YIELDS, 177 BUSHELS PER ACRE, BUT IT WAS OFFSET BY ETHANOL DEMAND.

Luke Swenson: OVERALL STOCKS IN THE U.S. ARE LOW, MARGINS ARE HIGH. THESE GUYS CAN KEEP BIDDING FUTURES WELL ABOVE WHERE THEY ARE, AND THEY CAN KEEP CHASING IT DOWN FOR THE TIME BEING. SO UNLESS YOU REALLY SEE ENERGY FALLING OFF AS A WHOLE, I MEAN NATURAL GAS FINALLY PULLED BACK, SO THAT MIGHT HELP FERTILIZER A LITTLE BIT. BUT ON THE LONG RUN, CRUDE OIL IS UP AT EIGHTY, THE ECONOMY'S RUNNING, WE'RE IN GREAT SHAPE.

WELL AND CORN IS GOING TO HAVE TO BID FOR SOME ACRES HERE.

Luke Swenson: ONE THING WE'RE PAYING ATTENTION TO, WE'RE ACTUALLY SHORT BEANS AGAINST CORN JUST BECAUSE WE THINK ACRES ARE REALLY GOING TO SURPRISE GOING FORWARD. AND WE THINK THE MARKET'S ALREADY REALLY SHIFTING TO PAY ATTENTION TO TWENTY TWO THERE.

CASH BASIS IS DOING ALL THE WORK HERE. HOW HIGH DO YOU THINK WE'RE GOING TO SEE PRICES GO THEN?

Luke Swenson: I THINK, WE'VE BEEN TELLING OUR GUYS IT'S GOING TO BE A BASIS-LED SALES MARKET. WE'RE NOT GOING TO BE LOOKING AT FUTURES REALLY IN SELLING, IT'S GOING TO BE BASIS LED ON STRATEGIC OPPORTUNITIES. YOU'VE GOT BULLISH GROWERS WITH A LOT OF CASH IN THEIR POCKETS, SITTING ON BINS IN A SITUATION THAT THEY HAVEN'T BEEN IN A DECADE. THEY CAN AFFORD TO SIT BACK IN THIS INFLATIONARY MARKET THEY'RE GOING TO LET IT WORK, I THINK.

SO CORN IS ALSO GETTING SOME HELP FROM THE WHEAT MARKET, WHICH HAS BEEN SURGING AND A LOT OF THAT IS DUE TO THESE TIGHT GLOBAL SUPPLIES, AND WE GOT MORE CONFIRMATION OF THAT IN THE REPORT. SO DO YOU CONTINUE TO SEE US CRACKING OUT THESE CONTRACT HIGH AREAS?

Luke Swenson: I REMEMBER THE LAST TIME, I THINK IT WAS 11.18 THAT WE HIT A FEW YEARS AGO. I MEAN, WE HIT 11.18 AND I BELIEVE WE WERE DOWN LIKE 45 CENTS BY THE END OF THE DAY. I MEAN, THERE'S NOTHING IN THAT MARKET, IT'S SO THIN. SET YOU TARGETS OUT THERE AND FORGET ABOUT THEM. IF THEY GET HIT, BE HAPPY, DON'T TRY AND PICK THE TOP PENNY ON THIS THING., BECAUSE IT CAN COME AND GO BEFORE YOU EVEN HAVE A CHANCE TO REACT.

IT IS GOING TO BE A VERY INTERESTING WINTER.

YES IT WILL.

ALL RIGHT, THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOUR ANALYSIS, LUKE SWENSON JOINING US FROM THE MONEY FARM.

FOUR U.S. SENATORS HAVE STRUCK A DEAL ON A PRICE DISCOVERY BILL TO EXPAND NEGOTIATED CASH TRADE FOR CATTLE AND TO ADDRESS THE LACK OF TRANSPARENCY IN THE MARKET.

THE CATTLE PRICE DISCOVERY AND TRANSPARENCY ACT ESTABLISHES REGIONAL MANDATORY MINIMUM THRESHOLDS OF NEGOTIATED CASH AND NEGOTIATED GRID TRADES BASED ON EACH REGION'S 18 MONTH AVERAGE TRADE. IT REQUIRES USDA TO MAINTAIN A MARKETING CONTRACT LIBRARY, PROHIBITS CONFIDENTIALITY IN LIVESTOCK PRICE REPORTING AND REQUIRES TIMELY REPORTING OF CATTLE CARCASS WEIGHTS AND CATTLE TO BE DELIVERED FOR SLAUGHTER EACH DAY FOR THE NEXT 14-DAYS.

MUCH OF THE INDUSTRY HAS BEEN SUPPORTIVE OF THE PROPOSAL.

Scott VanderWal: We think that something tailored to the various regions would make sense, while still saying yes, we probably do need a little more cash negotiated trade.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, AN HISTORIC NORTH DAKOTA ELEVATOR LOADS A RECORD-BREAKING TRAIN.

NORTH DAKOTA'S OLDEST CO-OP ELEVATOR IS MAKING HISTORY. THE HONEYFORD ELEVATOR RECENTLY BECAME THE FIRST IN THE U.S. TO LOAD AN 85-HUNDRED FOOT UNIT TRAIN. THAT'S 142 RAIL CARS.

ANN BAILEY HAS MORE ON WHAT THAT MEANS TO THE FUTURE OF RAIL TRANSPORT, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Kevin Peach: THE LARGER TRAIN YOU SHIP, THE CHEAPER THE FREIGHT IS TO GET IT THERE.

Ann Bailey: HONEYFORD CO-OP MANAGER KEVIN PEACH SAYS ELEVATORS NEED TO BE LOOKING FORWARD, OR THEY'LL BE LEFT BEHIND.

THIS 142-CAR TRAIN IS MORE THAN A MILE AND A HALF LONG. IT MARKS A MILESTONE THE CO-OP HAS BEEN BUILDING TOWARD FOR SEVERAL YEARS. PEACH SAYS THEY WANT TO BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF TECHNOLOGY...

AND LOADING THIS TRAIN HELPS KEEP THEM AHEAD OF THE MARKET.

Kevin Peach: WE'RE VERY PROUD OF THAT, WE'RE EXCITED TO HAVE BEEN ABLE TO DO IT HERE, AND YOU KNOW WE WORKED HARD AT GETTING TO THIS POINT. INVESTED A LOT OF MONEY TO GET TO THIS POINT.

THE TRAIN IS FILLED WITH 550,000 BUSHELS OF CORN, GROWN BY FARMERS IN A 50-MILE RADIUS OF THE TINY NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA TOWN. IT'S BOUND FOR AN ALBERTA, CANADA GRAIN COMPANY, WHERE IT WILL GO TO CATTLE FEEDLOTS. 8500 FOOT UNIT TRAINS HAVE RUN IN CANADA FOR SEVERAL YEARS, AND ARE LIKELY TO BECOME MORE COMMON IN THE STATES.

Gregg Haug: WE WORK HARD TO MAKE SURE THAT THESE GUYS STAY COMPETITIVE. THE ELEVATOR MANAGERS ARE WORKING WITH PRODUCERS TO GET THE BEST PRICE, AND THAT JUST DEPENDS ON THE BEST RATES. IT'S THE FUTURE REALLY, BUT THEY'RE FIRST.

THIS TRAIN HOLDS 44 PERCENT MORE GRAIN THAN TRADITIONAL 112-CAR TRAINS. CANADIAN PACIFIC'S DIRECTOR OF MARKETING WAS ON HAND TO WATCH IT GET LOADED. HE CALLS IT REVOLUTIONARY.

Jon Harman: WE EXPECT THIS TO BE THE MODEL OF THE FUTURE.

IN HONEYFORD, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ANN BAILEY FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN FARMERS ARE TEAMING UP WITH GOODYEAR TO PROVIDE SOY-BASED TIRES TO SHERIFF DEPARTMENTS ACROSS THE STATE AND PART OF THE STATE FLEET.

Soybean Council Chair Tim Ostrem says soybean oil replaces 45-percent of the petroleum in the tread of the Goodyear Eagle Enforcer tires.

Tim Ostrem: This is a new product that Goodyear is coming out with that allows law enforcement to use a product that is renewable and sustainable.

Carley Bishop with Goodyear says using soybean oil in the tread of the tire improves winter traction.

Carley Bishop: So the soybean oil has a lower freezing point to keep it pliable in those conditions, so that's the main part of these tires that's beneficial.

Sheriff Mike Milstead says they already use these tires and appreciate the donation.

Mike Milstead: We never knew that you know 40-percent of the petroleum came from soybeans, much of which is right here from South Dakota. So, pretty exciting that we're able to support the soybean industry, they support us.

A SUPPLY CHAIN CRISIS CONTINUES TO DISRUPT AGRICULTURE AND MAKE LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION MORE SOUGHT AFTER AND IMPORTANT THAN EVER.

THAT WAS THE MESSAGE SPEAKER TRENT LOOS SHARED AT A FAMILIES FEEDING FAMILIES EVENT IN YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA. HE TALKED ABOUT THE FRAGILE STATE OF THE FOOD AND ENERGY SECTORS AND HOW SUPPLY CHAIN SHORTAGES ARE CAUSING FOOD INFLATION.

Trent Loos: So energy also supplies part of the fertilizer for our food production and all of this is going to trickle down to the consumers. We're already seeing increased prices for every single food item in the store.

GROUP PRESIDENT BRANDON VAN OSDEL SAYS THE PANDEMIC HAS AMPLIFIED THE IMPORTANT ROLE FARMERS PLAY IN FEEDING THEIR COMMUNITIES.

Brandon Van Osdel: Cattle in a feedlot or whatever, to produce it and to process it and to get it to a plate. I mean that is interesting and crazy the amount of work that takes.

MORE THAN 250 COMMUNITY MEMBERS TURNED OUT FOR THE EVENT.

A CORSICA, SOUTH DAKOTA FARMER HAS BEEN SENTENCED TO 7 YEARS IN FEDERAL PRISON AND ORDERED TO PAY $24 MILLION IN RESTITUTION.

THIS COMES AFTER A FEDERAL INDICTMENT IN MARCH 2020, WHICH DETAILED ROBERT BLOM'S PONZI SCHEME INVOLVING ABOUT $10 MILLION IN FUNDS RELATED TO HIS CUSTOM CATTLE FEEDING BUSINESS. COURT DOCUMENTS SAY BLOM ALTERED PURCHASING DOCUMENTS, ALLOWING HIM TO SELL THE SAME GROUP OF CATTLE TO MULTIPLE BUYERS.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL MEET A YOUNG BISMARCK COUPLE HELPING TO STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA.

THE WEATHER PATTERN TURNED MORE ACTIVE THIS WEEK WITH A MIX OF RAIN AND SNOW. HOW LONG WILL THAT LAST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

NORTH DAKOTA'S RURAL COMMUNITIES OFFER LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES , AND ONE WAY TO GROW IS BY ATTRACTING MORE PEOPLE FROM OTHER STATES, OR COUNTRIES.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN MET SOME SOUTHERNERS WHO HAVE CHOSEN TO MAKE BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA HOME.

Leah Hargrove: PEOPLE HERE ARE AMAZING, THEY'RE KIND, THEY'RE HELPFUL. THEY MAKE GOOD FRIENDS.

ZACK AND LEAH HARGROVE WERE BORN AND RAISED IN THE SOUTH. THEY MET IN COLLEGE IN NORTH CAROLINA, THEN LANDED AT UND FOR ZACK'S GRADUATE PROGRAM IN METEOROLOGY IN 2012.

Leah Hargrove: I REMEMBER BEING DEVASTATED WHEN WE FIRST FOUND OUT. HE SAID WE'LL JUST GO TWO YEARS AND THEN WE CAN GO WHEREVER YOU WANT TO GO.

THEY DIDN'T REALLY PLAN TO STAY IN NORTH DAKOTA. BUT AS FATE WOULD HAVE IT, JOBS OPENED UP AT THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BISMARCK AND TEXAS, JUST AS ZACK WAS FINISHING HIS DEGREE.

Zack Hargrove: WE HAD BEEN TO BISMARCK A NUMBER OF TIMES AND WE LOVED THE AREA, IT'S RIGHT ON THE RIVER AND THE HILLS AND THE TERRAIN. SO WE REALLY LIKED THAT, AND THEN WE ALREADY HAD SOME FRIENDS HERE, SO EVERYTHING WORKED OUT. SO JUST EVERYTHING FELL INTO PLACE, AND SO WE'RE STILL HERE.

ZACK TOOK THE JOB, AND LEAH STARTED A NON-PROFIT, GLOBAL NEIGHBORS, TO HELP IMMIGRANTS. THE HARGROVES SAY LIVING IN A LESS POPULATED AREA GIVES THEM SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES.

Leah Hargrove: THERE'S A LOT OF SUPPORT IN NORTH DAKOTA FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND FOR START-UPS. OUR RESUMES ARE PRETTY ACCOMPLISHED FOR PEOPLE WHO AREN'T THAT OLD, AND THAT'S BECAUSE OF NORTH DAKOTA'S OPPORTUNITIES.

ZACH SAYS NORTH DAKOTA IS THE PERFECT PLACE FOR A WEATHER WATCHER AND STORM CHASER. DURING HIS WEATHER ADVENTURES HE FELL IN LOVE WITH PHOTOGRAPHING THE STATE'S BACK ROADS. IN FACT, A COLLECTION OF HIS PICTURES WERE TURNED INTO A BOOK.

Zack Hargrove: THAT'S ONE THING I LOVE ABOUT THIS STATE, I JUST LOVE DRIVING AROUND IT. SEEING THE STUFF THAT NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE SEE.

HE WAS HONORED AS PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE DECADE IN THE NORTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR'S PHOTO CONTEST. AND IN 2018 LEAH WAS NAMED BISMARCK'S HUMANITARIAN OF THE YEAR, HONORS THEY WOULDN'T EXPECT IN A MORE POPULOUS STATE. AND THEY APPRECIATE LIVING IN A PLACE WHERE THEIR KIDS ARE SAFE,

Leah Hargrove: MY DAD CAME TO VISIT AND HE SAID IT'S LIKE YOU LIVE IN MAYBERRY. KIDS WALK HOME FROM SCHOOL, THEY PLAY OUTSIDE, PEOPLE LEAVE THEIR HOMES UNLOCKED. I SAID YEAH, IT REALLY KIND OF IS.

Zack Hargrove: IT IS HARD TO DENY WHAT A GREAT PLACE THIS IS TO RAISE A FAMILY.

AND WHILE ZACK AND LEAH MAY STILL IDENTIFY AS SOUTHERNERS, THEY'RE KIDS ARE NORTH DAKOTANS, BORN AND RAISED

Leah Hargrove: YESTERDAY OUR FIVE YEAR OLD, SHE CAME HOME FROM SCHOOL AND SHE SAID UFFDA ABOUT SOMETHING. IT WAS SO CUTE!

IN BISMARCK, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM.

A SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA NURSE AND FARMER IS AMONG THOSE WHO HAVE CHOSEN TO LEAVE THEIR JOBS RATHER THAN GET A COVID VACCINE.

AMANDA VOLSEN AND HER HUSBAND, ERIC, FARM NEAR WALTERS, MINNESOTA. SHE HAS WORKED PART-TIME FOR THE MAYO CLINIC FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS.

THAT WORK PROVIDED IMPORTANT SIDE INCOME FOR HER FAMILY. BUT WHEN VOLSEN LEARNED SHE WOULD HAVE TO BE VACCINATED TO CONTINUE WORKING FOR MAYO, SHE DECIDED TO QUIT.

SHE SAYS SHE HAS SEVERAL REASONS FOR NOT GETTING THE VACCINE, BUT IT'S STILL HARD LEAVING NURSING.

Amanda Volsen: I'M PASSIONATE ABOUT PROVIDING GOOD CARE FOR PEOPLE, QUALITY CARE. SO JUST KNOWING THAT THAT WAS BEING SET ASIDE FOR NOW, WHEN AND IF I'LL RETURN BACK TO NURSING, I DON'T KNOW.

VOLSEN SAYS SHE HOPES TO EXPAND HER PHOTOGRAPHY BUSINESS TO REPLACE HER NURSING INCOME.

STILL AHEAD, THIS YEAR'S NORTHERN AG EXPO WILL BE THE LAST FOR A MAN WHO'S BEEN THERE... FROM THE START.

THE NORTHERN AG EXPO IS RETURNING TO THE FARGODOME, AFTER SKIPPING A YEAR BECAUSE OF COVID-19.

IT'S PUT ON BY THE NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

GARY KNUTSON, OUT-GOING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NDAA, SAYS THERE WILL BE ABOUT 160 EXHIBITORS AS WELL AS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS. THE EVENT WILL CONTINUE UNDER MANAGEMENT OF STU LETCHER, WHO ALSO LEADS THE NORTH DAKOTA GRAIN DEALERS ASSOCIATION.

KNUTSON HELPED LAUNCH THE EXPO IN 1993, AND THIS YEAR HE'S RETIRING.

Gary Knutson: WE'VE ALWAYS FELT LIKE THE FARMER NEEDS TO KNOW AS MUCH AS HE CAN ABOUT WHAT NEW PRODUCT OR NEW SERVICE OR NEW INNOVATION IS COMING TO HIM, AND WHY NOT COME TO THE TRADE SHOW AND GET IT UNDER ONE ROOF?

NORTHERN AG EXPO RUNS NOVEMBER 30TH AND DECEMBER FIRST AT THE FARGODOME.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.