This week on AgweekTV, the biofuels industry could receive a huge infrastructure boost if the budget reconciliation bill passes in Congress. We'll tell you about a research project that shows promise to reduce sunflower head rot the natural way, using bees. The sugarbeet harvest is wrapping up in the region. And the perfect supply chain storm tightens global fertilizer supplies and sends prices skyrocketing.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.



\u0009THE WHITE HOUSE AND CONGRESSIONAL DEMOCRATIC LEADERS HAVE PUT TOGETHER A REVISED FRAMEWORK FOR THE BUDGET RECONCILIATION BILL. THE BUILD BACK BETTER PLAN HAS A PRICE TAG OF $1.8 TRILLION, DOWN FROM THE PREVIOUS PROPOSAL OF $3.5 TRILLION.

THERE ARE PAY-FORS SUCH AS A 15-PERCENT CORPORATE MINIMUM TAX ON LARGE COMPANIES AND MULTIMILLIONAIRES. BUT ELIMINATION OF STEPPED-UP BASIS AND CHANGES IN THE ESTATE TAX AREN'T IN THE CURRENT PLAN SOUTH DAKOTA SENATOR JOHN THUNE SAYS THERE WILL BE A BIG FIGHT IF THAT ISN'T UPHELD AS IT MOVES THROUGH CONGRESS.

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Sen. John Thune: I lead a letter of all 50 Senate Republicans to the President basically saying we will oppose this vigorously and all we need is one Democrat to step up. Now the administration I think has gotten the message.



FOR AGRICULTURE IT INCLUDES A $25 PER ACRE PAYMENT FOR COVER CROPS AND INCREASES FUNDING FOR EQIP AND THE CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM. PLUS, THERE'S EXTRA DOLLARS FOR RURAL DEVELOPMENT, AND RESEARCH.



\u0009THE UPDATED DRAFT OF THE BUILD BACK BETTER ACT ALSO INCLUDES NEARLY ONE BILLION DOLLARS FOR BIOFUELS INFRASTRUCTURE.

THIS WOULD ALLOW USDA TO PROVIDE GRANTS DURING THE NEXT TEN YEARS TO EXPAND BIOFUEL PUMP INFRASTRUCTURE AND UPGRADE EXISTING TANKS AND PUMPS. DOUG NOEM WITH THE SOUTH DAKOTA CORN GROWERS ASSOCIATION SAYS IT WOULD ALSO INCREASE USAGE OF HIGHER BLENDS OF BIODIESEL AND ETHANOL OVER E-10.



Doug Noem: If somebody wants to build a new gas station and sell blends higher than E10 then they can apply for and get a grant for up to 75-percent of the cost for putting some of that equipment in such as dispensaries and pumps, and tanks and so on.



NOEM SAYS THIS IS A SIGNAL THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION RECOGNIZES BIOFUELS ARE PART OF THE SOLUTION TO THEIR CARBON REDUCTION STRATEGY. IF PASSED, THIS BIOFUELS INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM WOULD BE HUGE FOR THE INDUSTRY.



Over the past few years the most the ethanol industry's ever got for a program like this is $100 million. So people are over the top excited about a billion dollars.



THE ACT INCLUDES A NEW TAX CREDIT TO SUPPORT THE CREATION OF SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL.

PLUS THE BIODIESEL TAX CREDIT WOULD BE EXTENDED FOR FOUR YEARS. IT WAS SET TO EXPIRE AT THE END OF 2022.



\u0009THE HOUSE AG COMMITTEE HELD A HEARING THIS WEEK ON CHALLENGES TO THE FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN. THE PERFECT STORM HAS DISRUPTED THE FERTILIZER MARKET, CREATING A GLOBAL SHORTAGE AND PUSHING RETAIL PRICES TO NEAR RECORD HIGHS THIS FALL. IT'S THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.



Farmers are feeling the sting of skyrocketing fertilizer prices as they make fall applications, and prices may not cool anytime soon. Bob Larson with Nutrien Ag Solutions says retail prices for many nitrogen products have more than doubled from a year ago, with anhydrous ammonia around $980 per ton on a national average.



Larson: Ammonia up again probably $300 a ton in cost from where it was a year ago. In season, this late stuff that you bought probably say even upwards of $500 to $600.



Potash and phosphate have also bounced off of 15-year lows last fall, with potash at $730 per ton.



Larson: Phosphorus and potash are probably up $200 to $300 a ton from where we were last fall.



The price spike is a result of higher grain prices, but more so supply chain issues that have tightened supplies like 7-year highs in natural gas, plus logistical issues, including those tied to Hurricane Ida damage.



Larson: And so when the barges did not get unloaded on grain because of their facilities we ended up, you can't put fertilizer back on these barges and get them back up North filled up for this fall run.



That in turn is limiting the availability of fertilizer, which may override price concerns.



Larson: It's going to get tight later this fall. The last 20% supplies could get tight. Really all product lines will get tight. Which then means the system is empty.



And so, supplies will contract more by spring which could push prices even higher depending on natural gas.



Larson: I don't see it being really skyrocketing for spring from where it is today in season prices. Retail prices are today probably trading under cost today just because everybody has a position. So, realistically I think you'll probably see a $200 to $300, you know, still an increase to get to our replacement cost today.



His advice to farmers trying to manage the increased cost of production is to look at split applications, use of nitrogen stabilizers and in-season foliar feeding.



YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE OR AT AGWEEK.COM.



\u0009FARMERS HAVE SEEN BIG PRICE RUN-UPS IN THE FERTILIZER MARKET BEFORE. IN FACT, IN 2008 PRICES WERE HIGHER THAN THEY ARE TODAY. HOWEVER, THIS CYCLE IS DIFFERENT BECAUSE IT'S A GLOBAL SHORTAGE AND NO MATTER WHAT PRODUCERS ARE WILLING TO PAY, THEY MAY NOT BE ABLE TO GET THE PRODUCT.

MARKET EXPERT JOSH LINVILLE TOLD AGWEEK'S MIKKEL PATES HE'S NEVER SEEN THE GLOBAL MARKET HIT BY SO MANY NEGATIVE FACTORS SIMULTANEOUSLY. INCLUDING CHINA'S BAN ON FERTILIZER EXPORTS THROUGH JUNE 2022 TO CONSERVE ELECTRICITY.



Josh Linville: The Chinese represent one third of global urea production give or take, depending on how much they're producing. And so if they pull themselves from the marketplace you pull a lot of the exports out of the marketplace, you've just lowered supply significantly demand remains the same. High tide floats all boats.



PLUS NATURAL GAS PRICES ARE UP 224-PERCENT DOMESTICALLY, BUT PRICES IN EUROPE ARE FOUR TIMES HIGHER THAN IN THE U.S.



We have lost a pretty good amount of European nitrogen production because of natural gas values over there. It's just it simply costs them so much money to produce a ton of fertilizer that they can't afford it. >



HE RECOMMENDS FARMERS WORK WITH RETAILERS TO LINE UP INVENTORY NOW SO THEY GET IT LOCKED IN, ESPECIALLY FOR SPRING.



VARIOUS COMMODITY GROUPS ARE ASKING THE U.S. COURT OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE TO OVERTURN A PREVIOUS DECISION REGARDING PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER IMPORTS FROM MOROCCO.

IN MARCH THE ITC BEGAN IMPOSING TARIFFS ON MOROCCAN AND RUSSIAN PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER. MOSAIC FILED THE PETITION TO IMPLEMENT THE 19-PERCENT TARIFFS FOR FIVE YEARS.

THE GROUPS ARE CHALLENGING THE RULING CLAIMING MOSAIC CONTROLS OVER 80-PERCENT OF THE PHOSPHATE MARKET, GIVING THEM A NEAR-MONOPOLY STATUS. THIS HAS RESULTED IN A PHOSPHATE SHORTAGE.



SENATORS INCLUDING SOUTH DAKOTA'S JOHN THUNE AND MIKE ROUNDS HAVE INTRODUCED LEGISLATION TO REINSTATE MANDATORY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING FOR BEEF.

THE AMERICAN BEEF LABELING ACT WOULD REQUIRE THE U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, IN CONSULTATION WITH THE U.S. SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE, TO DEVELOP A WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION COMPLIANT MEANS OF REINSTATING M COOL ONE YEAR FROM ENACTMENT.

SENATOR MIKE ROUNDS SAYS THIS IS AN IMPORTANT STEP IN RESTORING MARKET INTEGRITY FOR CATTLE PRODUCERS AND CONSUMERS.



Sen. Mike Rounds: If something says that it's from the United States of America it ought to be from the United States of America and there's a value to being able to advertise it that way. Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling, one of the reasons why the folks out of state or out of the country don't like it is because there's a value to it that right now our American producers can't get.



CATTLE PRODUCERS LIKE KEITH EICHLER ARE OPTIMISTIC MCOOL CAN BE MADE WTO COMPLIANT AND GET THE NEEDED TRACTION IN CONGRESS.



Keith Eichler: We need M COOL bad and it'll happen. I truly believe there's a lot of support there by Senators all over the country because we not only want fair prices for the cattlemen, we want fair prices for the consumer.



HE SAYS RESTORING M COOL WILL ALLOW PRODUCERS TO BUILD DEMAND FOR U.S. PRODUCED CATTLE.

M COOL HAS LONG BEEN A PRIORITY FOR CATTLE GROUPS LIKE R-CALF. THEIR DATA INDICATES THAT DURING THE NEARLY SEVEN YEARS SINCE M COOL FOR BEEF WAS REPEALED, U.S. CATTLE PRODUCERS EXPERIENCED LOWER CATTLE PRICES.



COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, THE SUGARBEET HARVEST IS WRAPPING UP-WE'LL SEE HOW THE CROP FARED IN THIS TOUGH GROWING SEASON.



USDA'S RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY HAS RELEASED THE HARVEST PRICES FOR CROP INSURANCE WHICH ARE SET IN OCTOBER.



\u0009THEY EXCEEDED THE PROJECTED PRICE AVERAGES FROM FEBRUARY. FOR CORN IT'S UP 79-CENTS FROM THE SPRING PRICE, FOR SOYEANS 43-CENTS AND OIL TYPE SUNFLOWERS ARE UP $9.60 PER HUNDRED WEIGHT.

\u0009FARMERS USE THEIR ACTUAL PRODUCTION LOSS TO COLLECT FROM CROP INSURANCE, AND ANY PRODUCTION SHORTFALL IS PAID AT THE HIGHER HARVEST PRICE. HOWEVER, INDUSTRY EXPERTS SAY THEY DON'T EXPECT BIG PAYOUTS BECAUSE MANY YIELDS WERE BETTER THAN EXPECTED.



\u0009THE 2021 SUGARBEET SEASON WAS A CHALLENGE FROM THE START, BUT IN THE END, GROWERS PRODUCED A DECENT CROP.

\u0009ROSE DUNN HAS A WRAP-UP OF THE SEASON.



THE CROP IS NEARLY ALL HARVESTED NOW, AND AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY SAYS FARMERS HAVE PRODUCED NEARLY TWELVE MILLION TONS OF SUGARBEETS. THAT COMPARES TO TEN MILLION TONS LAST YEAR. YIELDS AVERAGE 28.7 TONS PER ACRE.

\u0009BUT THE DIRECTOR OF THE RED RIVER VALLEY SUGARBEET GROWERS, HARRISON WEBER, SAYS IT WASN'T AN EASY SEASON. IN THE SPRING, DRY CONDITIONS CAUSED POOR GERMINATION IN SOME FIELDS.



Harrison Weber: STARTING OFF IN THE SPRINGTIME WE HAD REALLY FAVORABLE CONDITIONS IMMEDIATELY TO START, BUT THEN IT GOT DRY VERY QUICKLY.



THEN A WIND STORM FORCED SOME GROWERS TO REPLANT, BUT IT REMAINED DRY, SO THOSE ACRES STRUGGLED WITH EMERGENCE.

\u0009FINALLY, SEVERAL INCHES OF TIMELY RAIN IN THE LATE SUMMER AND FALL, COMBINED WITH WARM TEMPERATURES ENCOURAGED ROOT GROWTH, AND ADDED SIGNIFICANT TONNAGE.



Harrison Weber: RIGHT IN THE NICK OF TIME, WE CAUGHT A COUPLE OF THOSE ONE INCH, INCH AND A HALF, TWO INCH RAINS UP AND DOWN THE VALLEY AND REALLY PUSHED THE CROP ALONG AT THE VERY TAIL END. WE GAINED A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF TONNAGE THE LAST SIX, EIGHT WEEKS OF KIND OF FALL, SUMMER TIME FRAME RIGHT BEFORE HARVEST, AND SO WITHOUT THAT LATE, LATE RAIN IT WOULD HAVE BEEN A TOTALLY DIFFERENT HARVEST FOR US.



THEN THE START OF HARVEST WAS DELAYED ABOUT TEN DAYS BY UNSEASONABLY WARM TEMPERATURES IN EARLY OCTOBER. SO ALL IN ALL NOT A RECORD CROP, BUT A GOOD YEAR.



Harrison Weber: NOT A HOME RUN CROP BY ANY MEANS, BUT WE'LL DEFINITELY TAKE IT. A STRONG, STRONG CROP.



IN FARGO, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.



SUGAR CONTENT IS GENERALLY LOWER IN THE SOUTHERN RED RIVER VALLEY, AND HIGHER IN THE NORTH, BUT ON AVERAGE IS ABOUT 17.9%,



\u0009THE FORMER MANAGER OF THE MCINTOSH-WATAUGA EQUITY EXCHANGE GRAIN ELEVATOR IS CHARGED WITH EMBEZZLING NEARLY $50,000.

\u0009DEANN MARIE HOLZWARTH HAD BEEN MANAGER FROM 2016 TO EARLY 2020.

THE LOSS WAS WAS NOTICED WHEN A FARMER REQUESTED PAYMENT OF 41-THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR 2018 WHEAT AND THE ELEVATOR FAILED TO PAY.

\u0009IN ADDITION, THE SOUTH DAKOTA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION CLAIMS THE ELEVATOR WAS NOT IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE COMMISSION'S FINANCIAL STANDARD FOR A GRAIN BUYER. HOLZWARTH WILL BE BACK IN COURT ON NOVEMBER 15TH.



\u0009AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, RESEARCHERS ARE USING BEES TO TREAT A DEVASTATING SUNFLOWER DISEASE.

\u0009AND LATER, IT'S APPLICATION TIME FOR MINNESOTA HEMP GROWERS.



AFTER A COLD, MOSTLY DRY WEEK WE ARE AGAIN SEEING A WARMING TREND TO HELP FINISH THE LAST OF THE HARVEST.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.



\u0009NDSU RESEARCHERS ARE STUDYING AN INNOVATIVE WAY TO CONTROL A DEVASTATING SUNFLOWER DISEASE.

\u0009AS ANN BAILEY REPORTS, THEY'RE HAVING GOOD RESULTS USING BEES TO FIGHT SUNFLOWER HEAD ROT.



This is the infected head of the sunflower.



SUNFLOWER HEAD ROT CAN DEVASTATE THE PLANTS, AND YIELDS. IT'S A FUNGUS, BUT FUNGICIDES AREN'T EFFECTIVE ON IT. NOW, NDSU SCIENTISTS AT THE LANGDON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER ARE WORKING ON A PROJECT TO USE HONEYBEES TO FIGHT THE DISEASE. RATHER THAN POLLINATING, THEY DELIVER CR-7, A NATURALLY OCCURRING FUNGAL ORGANISM.



Randy Mehlhoff: WITH NORTH DAKOTA BEING THE NUMBER ONE PRODUCER OF HONEY, AND THERE'S A LOT OF HIVES UP IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA, IT JUST SEEMS LOGICAL TO TRY THIS PROJECT WITH HONEYBEES, AND IT LOOKS LIKE IT'S WORKING. IT JUST SEEMS LIKE A REALLY GOOD FIT BOTH ENVIRONMENTALLY AND ECONOMICALLY.



PLANT PATHOLOGIST VENKAT CHAPARA IS LEADING THE RESEARCH. NDSU IS PARTNERING WITH A CANADIAN COMPANY.



Venkat Chapara: WE ARE HOPING TO FIGURE OUT HOW MANY BEE HIVES PER ACRE ARE NEEDED.



HE SAYS THE PROJECT OFFERS SEVERAL ADVANTAGES FOR GROWERS.



Venkat Chapara: CONTROL OF THE DISEASE, NO FUNGICIDE USE OR SPRAYING USE IS NEEDED SO YOU WILL SAVE MONEY ON SPRAYING, OK. AND ALSO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION WON'T BE THERE. THE THIRD ONE THEY MENTION IS HONEY. AND THE FOURTH ONE I SEE IS GOOD YIELD DIFFERENCE TOO.



Ann Bailey: IT'S ALL HANDS ON DECK FOR THIS RESEARCH PROJECT, AS SIX THOUSAND SUNFLOWER HEADS HAVE TO BE CUT BY HAND.



they go into the respective bags and we tag them.



Randy Mehlhoff: WE HAVE A BENEFIT FOR THE BEEKEEPERS, A BENEFIT FOR THE SUNFLOWER GROWERS, AND A BENEFIT FOR THOSE THAT LIKE TO EAT SUNFLOWERS.



THE RESEARCH ALSO INCLUDES BUMBLEBEES, BECAUSE THEY HANDLE COLDER TEMPERATURES BETTER THAN HONEYBEES. AT THE LANGDON RESEARCH CENTER, THIS IS ANN BAILEY FOR AGWEEK.



THIS BEE TECHNOLOGY HAS ALSO BEEN EFFECTIVE ON STRAWBERRIES AND OTHER CROPS IN THE SOUTHERN U.S.



ONLINE APPLICATIONS ARE NOW OPEN FOR ANYONE IN MINNESOTA WANTING TO GROW OR PROCESS HEMP IN 2022.

A LICENSE FROM THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IS REQUIRED FOR INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY APRIL 30 OF 2022 AND THE LICENSE IS GOOD FOR THE 2022 CALENDAR YEAR. THERE ARE SEVERAL CHANGES FOR THE UPCOMING SEASON REGARDING TESTING AND FEES. THOSE CHANGES AND THE APPLICATION CAN BE FOUND ON THE MDA WEBSITE.



STILL AHEAD, A NORTH DAKOTA FARMER GETS NATIONAL HONORS FOR HIS BUMPER CROP.



A NORTH DAKOTA FARMER IS THE NATION'S TOP WHEAT GROWER.

\u0009JOHN HOFER GROWS CORN, SOYBEANS AND WHEAT NEAR MILNOR. WHILE HIS SOYBEANS SUFFERED IN THE DROUGHT, HIS CORN YIELD WAS GOOD, BUT IT WAS HIS WHEAT THAT REALLY EXCELLED THIS YEAR.

\u0009HE'S THIS YEAR'S WINNER OF THE NATIONAL WHEAT YIELD CONTEST. HIS DRYLAND SPRING WHEAT CROP HAD A YIELD OF 122.27 BUSHELS AN ACRE.

\u0009HOFER HAS GROWN THE WEST BRED 9590 VARIETY FOR SEVERAL YEARS. IT HOLDS UP WELL AGAINST THE IRREGULAR EXCESSIVE HEAT AND DROUGHT THE REGION SAW OVER THE GROWING SEASON.

\u0009HOFER SAYS HE WAS EXPECTING A LOWER YIELD, BUT TIMELY RAINS REALLY HELPED.



John Hofer: We were dry just like everybody else, but the rains came at just the right time and it worked. It was just a matter of who was under the cloud at the right time.



DEB ANDERSON, THE OWNER OF DEB'S SEED SALES, ENTERED HOFER IN THE CONTEST. SHE SAYS THE WEST BRED VARIETY YIELDS EXCEPTIONALLY WELL, AND IS KNOWN FOR HAVING A GREAT TEST WEIGHT AND HIGH PROTEIN CONTENT.



THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.