Coming up on AgweekTV we will talk about the U.S. launching new trade talks with China and pushes for more meaningful reforms under the phase one deal. We'll look at how area colleges are preparing students for today's high tech agricultural jobs. We'll see the city of Sioux Falls use a new soy based concrete sealant to repair some of its streets. Finally, Farm Rescue hits a milestone helping farm families in neded.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THE U.S. LAUNCHES NEW TRADE TALKS WITH CHINA AND PUSHES FOR MORE MEANINGFUL REFORMS UNDER THE PHASE ONE DEAL.

WE'LL LOOK AT HOW AREA COLLEGES ARE PREPARING STUDENTS FOR TODAY'S HIGH TECH AGRICULTURAL JOBS.

THE CITY OF SIOUX FALLS USES A NEW SOY BASED CONCRETE SEALANT TO REPAIR SOME OF ITS STREETS.

Newsletter signup for email alerts

Michelle: The city of Sioux Falls is using a new soy-based concrete sealant to repair some of the streets like here on Marion Road.

AND FARM RESCUE HITS A MILESTONE HELPING FARM FAMILIES IN NEED.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION LAUNCHED NEW TRADE TALKS WITH CHINA THIS WEEK WITH A GOAL OF MORE MEANINGFUL REFORMS. U.S TRADE REPRESENTATIVE KATHERINE TAI ANNOUNCED THE U.S. WILL MAINTAIN THE ORIGINAL $370 BILLION OF TARIFFS ON CHINESE IMPORTS WHILE PUSHING BEIJING TO FULFILL ITS PLEDGES TO BUY MORE AG GOODS UNDER THE PHASE ONE DEAL.

China missed the 36.5 billion dollar goal in the Phase One deal in 2020 buying roughly 29 billion dollars of goods. Former Ambassador to China Terry Branstad says it wasn't a surprise.

Brandstad: They came close, but not quite. Part of that was because of COVID and the impact that that had on trade.

Regardless, China still purchased record amounts of ag goods which boosted U.S. farm prices.

Scott VanderWal: They've done a lot better than they have in the past and it's something that we haven't sold to them in the past and it increased our exports and put some excitement in the market and that's what we really needed.

Former Foreign Ag Service Administrator Mike Yost says China's buying hasn't all been tied to the Phase One.

Mike Yost: I'm told they're filling up the reserves, they were empty and food security is a big thing in China.

China's also behind on their 43.5 billion dollar commitment for 2021 as U.S. Census figures through August put their purchases at 19.3 billion dollars, which may trigger retaliation.

Brandstad: We'll see. We certainly hope that they will meet their responsibility under the agreement and that the agreement can be extended.

Yost: I only believe in what I see get loaded in the boat and unloaded in China because I think at any time things could blow up and they'll use any rationale to submarine the agreement.

And that makes a Phase Two deal even more unlikely which farm groups have been pushing the administration for, because that's where tariffs will finally be dropped.

HOURS BEFORE THEIR DEADLINE CONGRESS PASSED A CONTINUING RESOLUTION TO FUND THE GOVERNMENT THROUGH DECEMBER 3.

THE CR CONTAINED TEN BILLION DOLLARS OF DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR AGRICULTURE, EXTENDING THE WHIP PLUS PROGRAM TO COVER LOSSES FROM DROUGHT, FLOODS AND MORE IN 2020 AND 2021. THERE IS ALSO 750 MILLION DOLLARS IN DISASTER AID FOR LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS WITH LOSSES IN 2021. THE HOPE IS SIGN-UP CAN BE ROLLED OUT QUICKLY.

THIS WEEK'S CROP STOP TAKES US TO CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE THE SUNFLOWER CROP IS LOOKING PRETTY GOOD, DESPITE SOME CHALLENGING WEATHER.

DENNIS RENNER AND HIS SON LANCE GROW 500 ACRES OF SUNFLOWERS NEAR MANDAN.

THEY GOT VERY LITTLE RAIN DURING THE GROWING SEASON. COUPLED WITH SEVERAL DAYS OF 100 DEGREE TEMPS, MAKING IT CHALLENGING. SUNFLOWERS ARE A FAIRLY DROUGHT-TOLERANT CROP, BUT THEY DID GET SEVERAL INCHES OF RAIN IN LATE AUGUST, WHICH HELPED.

Lance Renner: I THINK SO, THEY'RE STILL BLOOMING, SO I THINK THAT HELPED WITH GETTING SOME SEEDS PUT IN THE HEADS AND EVERYTHING LIKE THAT, AND FILL. SO THAT WILL HELP WITH THE TEST WEIGHT AND WITH THE OIL CONTENT.

THE RENNERS' YIELDS TYPICALLY RANGE FROM 15 TO 18-HUNDRED POUNDS AN ACRE, AND THEY EXPECT TO GET AT LEAST 15-HUNDRED, SO THEY'RE PLEASED. THEY EXPECT TO START SUNFLOWER HARVEST AT THE END OF THE MONTH.

OVER THE GROWING SEASON, WE'VE BEEN FOLLOWING SEVERAL FARMERS FROM PLANTING TO HARVEST.

DAN SPIEKERMEIER, WHO FARMS IN SOUTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA WITH HIS SON, GROWS CORN, SOYBEANS, AND SUNFLOWERS.

HE SAYS EVEN WITH SOME OBSTACLES FROM MOTHER NATURE THIS SPRING, HE'S HAPPY WITH HIS CROPS.

DESPITE A HARD MAY FROST AND A HOT, DRY SUMMER, THE HARVEST IS GOING WELL AND THE HOT WEATHER IS HAVING THE SAME EFFECT AS A FREEZE IN STOPPING PLANT GROWTH. HE SAYS THEY'RE HAPPY WITH SOYBEANS YIELDS, WHICH ARE RANGING FROM MID-FORTIES TO LOW FIFTIES, WITH MOISTURE LEVELS BELOW TEN PERCENT.

Dan Spiekermeier: FOR AS HOT AND DRY AS IT WAS I DON'T KNOW HOW IT EVEN GOT THAT FAR, SO WE'RE LUCKY TO HAVE THAT.

SPIEKERMEIER SAYS THE HOT, DRY WEATHER DOES GIVE HIM MORE CONCERNS ABOUT COMBINE FIRES.

A NAPOLEON, NORTH DAKOTA CATTLE DEALER IS FACING CRIMINAL CHARGES FOR FAILING TO PAY FOR MILLIONS OF DOLLARS OF CATTLE.

BRIAN WAYNE GADER IS ACCUSED OF BOUNCING A CHECK FOR MORE THAN 200 THOUSAND DOLLARS TO THE LAKE REGION LIVESTOCK SALE BARN IN DEVILS LAKE, IN DECEMBER OF 2020.

GADER'S A LONGTIME CATTLE BUYER WHO HAD DONE BUSINESS AS "GADER CATTLE COMPANY" WITH HIS WIFE KRISTY.

GADER ALSO FACES SEVERAL CIVIL CASES AROUND THE REGION, WITH CLAIMS WORTH MILLIONS.

HE'S A FORMER PARTNER IN NAPOLEON LIVESTOCK, WHERE HE STILL ATTENDS SALES EVERY WEEK. NORTH DAKOTA'S AG COMMISSIONER SAYS ALTHOUGH GADER IS NO LONGER LICENSED, THERE'S NOTHING STOPPING HIM FROM ATTENDING.

Doug Goehring: UNTIL THE OWNER OF THE SALE BARN DOESN'T WANT HIM THERE, HE SAYS I DON'T WANT YOU ON MY PREMISES, I BELIEVE THEY HAVE A LEGAL RIGHT TO PROBABLY ASK HIM TO LEAVE, BUT WE DON'T.

GADER LOST HIS LICENSE TO DEAL CATTLE LAST MARCH. HE IS SCHEDULED FOR A HEARING ON THE DEVILS LAKE CASE ON OCTOBER 14TH.

AFTER A TURBULENT YEAR, THINGS MAY BE LOOKING UP FOR CATTLE PRODUCERS.

FIRST THEY DEALT WITH COVID-RELATED SUPPLY CHAIN AND CATTLE MARKET DISRUPTIONS, FOLLOWED BY THE DROUGHT.

NOW THEY JUST HOPE TO GET BACK TO NORMAL IN THE COMING YEAR. THE PRESIDENT-ELECT OF THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S BEEF ASSOCIATION SAYS PRODUCERS ARE DOING WHAT THEY CAN TO HOLD ONTO THEIR CATTLE, BUT IT'S CHALLENGING.

Don Schiefelbein: WHAT'S EXCITING IS WE KIND OF CAN SEE THE GOLD AT THE END OF THE RAINBOW, IT LOOKS LIKE THIS MARKET'S GOING TO RETURN, SO THERE ARE PRODUCERS WHO ARE DOING EVERYTHING IN THEIR POWER TO TRY AND HOLD ON TO THAT INVENTORY, KEEP THOSE COWS, KEEP THAT FACTORY IN STOCK. BUT IN SOME PLACES THERE JUST IS NO NEGOTIATION WITH MOTHER NATURE, AND YOU CAN SEE THAT COW LIQUIDATION IS OCCURRING.

SCHIEFELBEIN, WHO IS FROM KIMBALL, MINNESOTA, TAKES OVER AS NATIONAL PRESIDENT IN FEBRUARY.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL SEE HOW A NEW EDUCATIONAL FACILITY IS HELPING TRAIN STUDENTS FOR AG CAREERS.

SEVERAL COLLEGES AROUND THE REGION OFFER TWO OR FOUR YEAR DEGREES IN AG. AND THEY'RE WORKING TO KEEP UP WITH THE EVER-CHANGING INDUSTRY.

ANN BAILEY VISITED A NEW FACILITY IN CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA, AND GIVES YOU A LOOK IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Preston Sundeen: WE THINK THAT THERE IS AN UNBELIEVABLE AMOUNT OF CAREER OPPORTUNITIES.

PRESTON SUNDEEN IS DIRECTOR OF THE PRECISION AG PROGRAM AT LAKE REGION STATE COLLEGE IN DEVILS LAKE NORTH DAKOTA. UNLIKE AG PROGRAMS FROM AN EARLIER ERA, TODAY'S FOCUS ON USING TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FARMING.

Preston Sundeen: WE PROVIDE REAL WORLD EXPERIENCE.

LAKE REGION STATE COLLEGE'S BRAND NEW HOFSTAD AG CENTER LETS STUDENTS GET EXPERIENCE WITH PRECISION AG EQUIPMENT AND OTHER MACHINERY. OUTSIDE, THEY GET TO USE EQUIPMENT ON A 40-ACRE FIELD. THIS YEAR THEY PLANTED CORN.

Preston Sundeen: WE'RE VERY HANDS ON AND THAT'S WHAT WE REALLY WANT TO PROMOTE HERE. HALF OF OUR NEW FACILITY IS A SHOP TO BE HANDS ON, OUR CLASSROOMS ALSO HAVE THAT HANDS ON COMPONENTS TO THEM.

WHETHER STUDENTS TAKE THAT KNOWLEDGE BACK TO THE FARM, INTO AGRI-BUSINESS, OR A COMBINATION OF BOTH, SUNDEEN SAYS THESE TWO-YEAR PROGRAMS PREPARE THEM THOSE CAREERS.

Preston Sundeen: I LIKE TO THINK THAT WE GIVE A REALLY BIG FOUNDATION IN AG, AND PRECISION AG IS JUST INTERTWINED INTO IT ALL, AND THEN FROM THERE STUDENTS GET A GOOD START IN AN AG CAREER.

SUNDEEN SAYS THIS NEW FACILITY WILL CONTINUE TO HELP THEIR AG PROGRAM GROW. IN DEVILS LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ANN BAILEY FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

FARM RESCUE HAS HIT A MAJOR MILESTONE.

THE NORTH DAKOTA GROUP HELPS FARM FAMILIES IN NEED, AND RECENTLY THEY ASSISTED THEIR 800TH FAMILY.

EUGENE AND KATIE BIRKLID FELL BEHIND AFTER HE HAD BRAIN SURGERY, SO FARM RESCUE STEPPED IN TO HELP WITH THEIR SOYBEAN HARVEST. THE BIRKLIDS SAY THEY'RE GRATEFUL.

Eugene Birklid: IT'S REALLY HELPFUL, AND I'M THANKFUL FOR THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WANT TO COME AND HELP ME, HELP US. IT'S STRESSFUL AND WE WEREN'T SURE HOW WE WERE GOING TO GET IT ALL DONE WITH ME BEING OUT OF COMMISSION FOR A LITTLE WHILE.

Katie Birklid: IT'S BEEN A HUGE RELIEF. I WAS REALLY NERVOUS ABOUT HOW WE WERE GOING TO HANDLE HARVEST THIS YEAR, AND FARM RESCUE COMING IN WAS A HUGE BLESSING.

FARM RESCUE IS A NON-PROFIT THAT WAS STARTED 15 YEARS AGO TO HELP WITH JOBS LIKE PLANTING OR HARVESTING WHEN A KEY FAMILY MEMBER IS UNABLE TO DO IT.

AFTER HARVEST WRAPS UP A NEW SOFTWARE PROGRAM MAY HELP CUSTOMERS RETHINK THE VALUE OF FEED INGREDIENTS, WHICH COULD BE A BIG ADVANTAGE FOR UPPER MIDWEST SOYBEAN GROWERS.

PETER SCHOTT IS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF GENESIS FEED TECHNOLOGIES, A SOFTWARE COMPANY WORKING TO MEASURE ENERGY IN ANIMAL FEED.

\u0009SCHOTT SAYS TYPICALLY THE VALUE OF SOYBEANS IS BASED ON CRUDE PROTEIN, BUT GROWERS SHOULD GET MORE MONEY FOR THEIR CROPS BASED ON ITS ENERGY, INCLUDING SUGAR AND AMINO ACIDS.

BEANS GROWN IN THIS REGION HAVE HIGHER SUGAR CONTENT. BUT THE SUGAR ISN'T ALWAYS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS VALUE.

Peter Schott: WITH SUGAR THERE COMES ENERGY WITH IT, AND ENERGY IS VERY VALUABLE TO THE ANIMALS THAT EAT THE SOYBEANS IN IT, SO WHEN YOU START TO FACTOR THAT INTO WHAT THE SOYBEAN IS BRINGING TO THE ANIMAL FEED, IT RAISES THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF IT QUITE A BIT.

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL IS USING THE SOFTWARE TO PROMOTE SOYBEANS AROUND THE WORLD.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, SIOUX FALLS IS USING SOY TO FIX STREETS!

AND LATER, BEEF TAKES CENTER FIELD AT A BIG GAME.

THE HARVEST ROLLED ALONG QUICKLY THIS WEEK WITH MOSTLY OPEN WEATHER. WHAT'S THE REST OF OCTOBER LOOK LIKE?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

NORTH DAKOTA'S RURAL COMMUNITIES OFFER LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES , AND THEY'RE ATTRACTING MORE PEOPLE TO NORTH DAKOTA.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN TALKS TO A FORMER KANSAS COUPLE ABOUT WHAT FIRST BROUGHT THEM TO THE STATE, AND WHAT KEEPS THEM HERE.

THANKS FOR CALLING THE BOWMAN POLICE DEPARTMENT, THIS IS MELINDA. HOW MAY I HELP YOU?

MELINDA PADILLA LYNCH AND HER HUSBAND MATTHEW HAVE LIVED IN BOWMAN, NORTH DAKOTA FOR TEN YEARS. THEY DECIDED TO MOVE THERE DURING THE GREAT RECESSION, AFTER MATTHEW LOST HIS CONSTRUCTION JOB IN KANSAS CITY.

Matthew Lynch: IT WAS NEVER THE PLAN TO GO TO NORTH DAKOTA.

Melinda Padilla Lynch: WE HAD NO IDEA THAT OIL WAS EVEN UP HERE. WE JUST SAW JOBS ON CRAIGS LIST, AND THERE WAS TONS OF JOBS IN NORTH DAKOTA.

IT WAS A BIG CULTURE SHOCK MOVING FROM A BIG CITY TO THIS WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA TOWN OF 14-HUNDRED. BUT THEY QUICKLY SETTLED IN TO THEIR NEW LIFE IN THE NORTH. MELINDA WORKS AT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT AND MATTHEW HAS A CONSTRUCTION BUSINESS.

Melinda Padilla Lynch: WE STARTED HAVING KIDS, AND THEN MY HUSBAND OPENED HIS OWN BUSINESS, AND THEN WE KIND OF JUST HAD MADE THIS PLACE MORE PERMANENT.

THEY SAY IT'S A GOOD PLACE TO RAISE THEIR TWO YOUNG SONS- CLEAN AND SAFE, WITH GOOD SCHOOLS.

Matthew Lynch: I SEE NO REASON TO GO ANYWHERE ELSE. I LIKE HOW CLEAN IT IS. I LIKE THE GENEROSITY AND THE NICENESS OF THE PEOPLE.

PADILLA LYNCH BRINGS A LOT OF ENTHUSIASM TO HER JOB. THIS MONTH, SHE'S HOSTING THE SECOND ANNUAL CONFERENCE FOR POLICE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. SHE CAME UP WITH THE IDEA A FEW YEARS AGO, AND HER BOSS, POLICE CHIEF CHARLES HEADLEY, WAS IN FULL SUPPORT. THEY DRAW POLICE SUPPORT STAFF FROM FOUR STATES TO BOWMAN FOR THE TWO-DAY EVENT.

Melinda Padilla Lynch: THAT REALLY HAS BEEN ONE OF MY GREATEST, LIKE I SAID, ENDEAVOURS THAT HAS COME TO FULFILL ME AS AN ADMIN IN THIS ROLE.

CHIEF HEADLEY, IS ALSO A TRANSPLANT FROM NEBRASKA. HE SAYS SHE BRINGS A LOT OF ENERGY AND INNOVATION TO THE DEPARTMENT, THE COMMUNITY, AND THE STATE. AND HE SAYS THEY COULD USE MORE LIKE HER.

Charles Headley: IF YOU'RE THINKING OF SETTLING DOWN, HAVING A CAREER IN LAW ENFORCEMENT, AND RAISING A FAMILY, YOU WON'T FIND ANY BETTER THAN WHAT YOU CAN FIND IN THIS STATE.

THE LYNCHES SAY THEY WERE SURPRISED AT HOW MUCH BOWMAN HAS TO OFFER, AND THINK THIS SMALL COMMUNITY HAS BIG OPPORTUNITIES.

Melinda Padilla Lynch: I SEE SO MUCH POTENTIAL FOR GROWTH. I SEE SO MANY GREAT THINGS THAT REALLY COULD HAPPEN.

IN BOWMAN, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM.

\u0009THE CITY OF SIOUX FALLS IS USING A NEW CONCRETE SEALANT TO REPAIR SOME OF ITS STREETS. IT'S A SOY BASED DURABILITY ENHANCER THAT'S ALSO RENEWABLE.

Poreshield is made from soybean oil and provides protection against water, freezing and thawing and salt.

Paul Imbrock: It works by going into the pores of the concrete where it blocks water and ions from entering the concrete. Which means that Poreshield lasts quite a bit longer, where one application provides protection for 10 plus years.

That saves money on bridge and road joint repair and it's 93-percent biobased so its environmentally friendly.

Imbrock: It helps the environment by reducing the amount of CO2 needed to replace cement or replace concrete as co2 emissions is a big part of cement manufacture and generally concrete construction.

The South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council funded the Poreshield application, which utilizes 200 bushels of soybeans per mile of highway joint.

Jerry Schmitz:We know that it will extend the life of roads and what a win win for farmers, their local communities can be using a product produced right here.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, DROUGHT MAKES IT HARDER TO PICK THE PERFECT PUMPKIN AT A POPULAR PUMPKIN PATCH.

CATTLE PRODUCTION IS BIG BUSINESS IN SOUTH DAKOTA AND IT TOOK CENTER STAGE DURING THE SDSU BEEF BOWL IN BROOKINGS.

IT WAS A GREAT DAY OF TAILGATING AND 1700 PEOPLE WERE SERVED AT THE ANNUAL BEEF BARBEQUE TO RAISE MONEY FOR ANIMAL SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIPS. BEEF BOWL IS ALSO A CELEBRATION OF THE BEEF INDUSTRY.

Joe Cassady: And of course agriculture's our number one industry so beef production is just critically important to the state of South Dakota and its economy.

THE SOUTH DAKOTA BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL HOSTED A BEEF E COMPETITION WON BY STILL HARES.

Gary Deering: You know appearance is a lot of it. Taste is a big one for me obviously and some of the outside the box thinking. And that's the great thing about with our product is there's a lot of different ways you can cook our product.

HE SAYS THEY ALSO HIGHLIGHTED THEIR BUILD YOUR BASE WITH BEEF SPORTS NUTRITION PROGRAM THAT THE SDSU FOOTBALL TEAM PARTICIPATES IN.

THEA'S PUMPKIN PATCH IS A POPULAR DESTINATION THIS TIME OF YEAR,

THE PATCH IS LOCATED IN EAST CENTRAL MINNESOTA, NEAR MAPLEWOOD STATE PARK.

THE OLSON FAMILY STARTED IT NEARLY A DECADE AGO, AT FIRST JUST TO GROW PUMPKINS FOR THEIR OWN DECORATING. BUT NOW IT'S GROWN TO INCLUDE A CORN MAZE, HAY RIDES, FOOD AND A PETTING ZOO.

MIKE OLSON SAYS THE CORN FOR THEIR MAZE GREW SURPRISINGLY WELL THIS YEAR, BUT LIKE PUMPKIN GROWERS AROUND THE COUNTRY, THEA'S CROP SUFFERED IN THE DROUGHT

Mike Olson: NORMALLY THE PUMPKINS, IT AIN'T THAT BIG A DEAL, THEY LIKE IT A LITTLE DRIER THAN TOO WET. BUT THE ORANGE ONES THIS YEAR REALLY GOT AFFECTED. WE DON'T HAVE THE SIZE OR THE QUANTITY.

THEA'S PUMPKIN PATCH SEES ABOUT 15-HUNDRED VISITORS ON A NICE FALL WEEKEND. OLSON SAYS THEY'RE PLANNING SOMETHING NEW FOR NEXT YEAR TO EXTEND THE SEASON, BUT HE'S NOT READY TO SAY WHAT IT IS.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.