Coming up on AgweekTV, we'll see harvest starting in the western Corn Belt and we'll take a look at yield prospects in South Dakota and Minnesota. We'll discuss people thinking about irrigation in western North Dakota. We'll discuss the drought forcing cattle producers to cull deeper and travel farther for feed. Finally, we'll see a new precision ag center at SDSU bringing innovation to the region.



COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

HARVEST IS STARTING IN THE WESTERN CORN BELT, WE'LL LOOK AT YIELD PROSPECTS IN SOUTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA.

Mikkel Pates: AS THE LAND DRIES UP, PEOPLE THINK ABOUT IRRIGATION IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA.

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THE DROUGHT IS FORCING CATTLE PRODUCERS TO CULL DEEPER AND TRAVEL FARTHER FOR FEED.

AND THE NEW PRECISION AG CENTER AT SDSU BRINGS INNOVATION TO THE REGION.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THIS WEEK WE'RE AT THE BIG IRON FARM SHOW AT THE FAIRGROUNDS IN WEST FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA.

EVERY YEAR MORE THAN 60,000 ATTENDEES COME TO THE SHOW TO SEE DEMONSTRATIONS AND VISIT EXHIBITS COVERING MORE THAN 200 ACRES OF GROUND. PLUS FARMERS ATTEND TRAINING AND EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS, GET HEALTH SCREENINGS AND NETWORK.

THIS YEAR'S FIELD DEMOS INCLUDED AN AUTONOMOUS GRAIN CART, AND SPEAKERS LOOKED AT TOPICS FROM FARM POLICY TO LAND AND GRAIN MARKETS.

TOPPING OUR AG NEWS, THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION IS TAKING ACTION TO ADDRESS CONCENTRATION WITHIN THE MEATPACKING INDUSTRY AND ENSURE FOOD SECURITY WITH THE RISING COST OF FOOD.

THE WHITE HOUSE SAYS ABOUT HALF OF THE OVERALL INCREASE IN GROCERY STORE PRICES CAN BE ATTRIBUTED TO BEEF, PORK AND POULTRY. BEEF AND PORK HAVE SEEN A DOUBLE DIGIT INCREASE IN PRICE IN THE LAST COUPLE OF MONTHS. THEY POINT TO PACKER CONCENTRATION WITH FOUR PACKERS CONTROLLING FROM 55 TO 85-PERCENT OF THE BUSINESS AND SAY IT RAISES CONCERN ABOUT PROFITEERING.

TO HELP ADDRESS CONSOLIDATION, USDA IS STRENGTHENING THE PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT. THERE WILL ALSO BE MORE FOCUS ON PRICE DISCOVERY, COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF MEAT, AND EXPANDED MEAT PACKER CAPACITY AMONG SMALL PROCESSORS. AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK SAYS PACKERS ARE MAKING RECORD PROFITS WHILE FARMERS AND RANCHERS LOSE MONEY.

CATTLE PRODUCERS ARE SLOWLY SEEING SOME PROGRESS ON INCREASING COMPETITION AND TRANSPARENCY IN THE MARKETPLACE.

USDA RECENTLY STARTED RELEASING FORMULA CONTRACT INFORMATION ON CATTLE. THIS WAS ONE OF THE REMEDIES AGREED UPON BY CATTLE GROUPS. CATTLEMEN HOPE ITS A PARTIAL VICTORY, BUT WITH ONLY A FEW REPORTS RELEASED, IT'S TOO EARLY TO TELL.

Bob Noble: We just don't know yet how that is going to work but more information has got to be good. I hope NOBLE SAYS AFTER THE NCBA CONVENTION, HE'S ALSO OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THEIR 75-PERCENT RULE TO INCREASE THE NEGOTIATED CASH CATTLE TRADED.

The packers signed their agreement to have their data analyzed for the packer participation silo, part of that 75-percent rule.

PACKING CAPACITY IS ALSO ADVANCING WITH EXPANSION PLANS AT TAMA, IOWA AND NEW MEDIUM SIZED PLANTS ANNOUNCED IN IOWA AND NEBRASKA.

DROUGHT-STRICKEN CATTLE PRODUCERS IN NORTHERN NORTH DAKOTA ARE MAKING CHALLENGING COUNTERMOVES. AS MIKKEL PATES REPORTS, THEY'RE SELLING OFF ANIMALS EARLIER THAN THEY'D LIKE, AND TRAVELING FARTHER THAN THEY WANT FOR FEED.

Jeff Kuntz: I don't know that any of this would have made any grain in it.

JEFF KUNTZ RAISES CATTLE IN NORTH CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA. THE REGION HAS BEEN HIT HARD BY THE DROUGHT, AND ON THIS DAY, KUNTZ IS CUTTING ANOTHER FARMER'S DROUGHTED-OUT CORN FIELD 40 MILES FROM HOME TO USE FOR LIVESTOCK FEED FOR THE WINTER.

Jeff Kuntz: YOU SEE THE CORN IN THE WINDROW BUT I DON'T BELIEVE THAT IT WOULD HAVE ACTUALLY MADE MATURE CORN. AND I'M NOT SURE WHAT HIS INSURANCE COMPANY, IF THEY ZEROED IT OUT COMPLETELY OR GAVE HIM A YIELD. IT WASN'T GOING TO MAKE ENOUGH OF A YIELD TO COMBINE FOR HIM.

THE KUNTZ RANCH USUALLY RUNS ABOUT 300 COWS. HE HOPES THIS CORN STOVER HELPS GET THEM THROUGH THE WINTER, BUT HE HAS HAD TO SELL OFF 140 COW-CALF PAIRS.

Jim Ziegler: WE'RE JUST HITTING THE TIME OF YEAR THEY'RE HAVING TO DO SOME DRASTIC CHANGES.

JIM ZIEGLER OWNS LAKE REGION LIVESTOCK, A SALE BARN AT DEVILS LAKE. THIS SUMMER HAS BEEN A BUSY ONE FOR HIM. ZIEGLER SAYS THEY'VE HELD WEEKLY CATTLE SALES THROUGH THE SUMMER, RATHER THAN EVERY OTHER WEEK.

Jim Ziegler: PEOPLE ARE WEANING CATTLE EARLY, THEY'RE TAKING COWS OFF OF GRASS, THEY'RE CULLING EARLY, DOING DIFFERENT THINGS.

IF THE DROUGHT CONTINUES, THE GOVERNMENT WILL LIKELY COME UP WITH LOAN AND FEED ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS, BUT IN THE MEANTIME, ZIEGLER EXPECTS HIS SALE BARN TO STAY BUSY INTO THE FALL.

Jim Ziegler: BASICALLY MOST OF THE CALF CROP WILL BE GONE FROM THE STATE BEFORE CHRISTMAS I WOULD GUESS.

THE UPSIDE IS THAT CATTLE PRICES ARE HIGHER THAN THEY WERE A YEAR AGO. IN NORTH CENTRAL NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

HARVEST IS UNDERWAY AS WE CONTINUE THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR. I TALKED TO TERRY SCHULTZ, WITH MUSTANG SEEDS ABOUT YIELD PROSPECTS IN SOUTH DAKOTA. WE STARTED OFF TALKING ABOUT THE VARIABILITY OF DROUGHT IN THE STATE.

Terry Schultz: VARIABILITY ON THIS CROP IS PROBABLY MORE THAN I'VE REALLY SEEN IN THE LAST THIRTY YEARS. IT VARIES IN THE FIELD, NOT EVEN, YOU KNOW OBVIOUSLY COUNTY BY COUNTY.

SO TERRY WHAT ARE YOU THINKING THE STATEWIDE CORN YIELD IS GOING TO BE LIKE THIS YEAR IN SOUTH DAKOTA?

Terry Schultz: CORN YIELDS, YOU KNOW, I BELIEVE ARE PROBABLY GOING TO BE 25 TO 30 PERCENT OFF OF TREND YIELD FOR OUR AREA. I THINK WE'RE GOING TO SEE EVERYWHERE FROM ZERO TO 250.

WE DID GET SOME LATE SEASON RAINS, DID THEY HELP AT ALL TO FILL THE CROP?

Terry Schultz: YOU KNOW, THEY'RE PROBABLY GOING TO HELP A LITTLE BIT ON TEST WEIGHT, WHICH WILL RESULT IN SOME YIELD. BUT IT'S NOT GOING TO GIVE US AS MUCH BOOST AS I THINK IT PROBABLY DID THE LATE SOYBEANS.

AND ARE YOU CONCERNED ABOUT STANDABILITY OF THE CORN?

Terry Schultz: STANDABILITY IS GOING TO DEFINITELY BE A CONCERN. WE SEE, YOU KNOW, THESE NEW GENETICS WE STRIVE FOR HIGH YIELDS, AND WHEN IT DOESN'T HAVE MOISTURE IT PULLS THAT FROM THE MIDDLE OF THE STALK, CAUSES ANTHRACNOSES.

AND WHAT ABOUT SOYBEANS, WHAT ARE YOU THINKING YIELDS ARE GOING TO BE LIKE THERE?

SOYBEAN YIELDS, I THINK ARE GOING TO PROBABLY BE OFF BY THIRTY PERCENT OFF OF WHAT WE WOULD EXPECT FOR A BUMPER CROP.

AND WE'RE ALREADY HARVESTING SOME OF THE CROP AND IT'S DRYING DOWN FAST, ISN'T IT?

YES, YOU KNOW, AS WE'VE SEEN LAST YEAR, IT GOT VERY DRY. YOU KNOW YOU GET DOWN BELOW TEN PERCENT, INTO THE NINES, THAT'S VERY DIFFICULT, AND WE'RE GOING TO SEE THAT AGAIN THIS YEAR.

TERRY SCHULTZ JOINING US WITH MUSTANG SEEDS.

Noah: I'm Agweek reporter Noah Fish and we're in Southeast Minnesota today and I'm with Michael Cruz of the University of Minnesota Extension. Michael, what kind of conditions has this area seen as far as weather?

Michae Cuz: YEAH, FOR SURE. SO COMPARED TO SOME OF THE OTHER PLACES AROUND THE STATE WE ACTUALLY CAUGHT SOME PRETTY TIMELY RAINS THIS YEAR, SO WHEN EVERYBODY ELSE IS KIND OF TALKING ABOUT DROUGHT RIGHT NOW, WE ACTUALLY ARE DOING RELATIVELY OK. WE ARE A LOT MORE ON THE WET SIDE THAN SOME OF THE OTHER PEOPLE IN THE STATE.

COMPARED TO AN AVERAGE YEAR, YIELDS ARE GOING TO BE DOWN THIS YEAR PROBABLY?

Michae Cuz: YEAH FOR SURE YIELDS ARE GOING TO BE DOWN AROUND HERE, AND I THINK ONE OF THE BIG THINGS THAT FARMERS ARE GOING TO SEE IS THAT YIELDS ARE VARIABLE BOTH FOR SOYBEANS AND FOR CORN. DECENT YIELDS AROUND HERE BUT WE DEFINITELY LOST ON OUR TOP END.

MICHAEL WHAT ARE THE CONDITIONS LOOKING LIKE FOR THE CORN CROP?

Michae Cuz: YEAH, VERY SIMILAR TO THE SOYBEAN SITUATION. OBVIOUSLY THE CORN WAS, KIND OF WENT THROUGH A FEW MORE COLDER SEASONS THAN THE SOYBEANS DID BUT THE VARIABILITY IS GOING TO BE THE KEY THING THAT YOU'RE GOING TO SEE IN CORN CROPS AS WELL. EVEN THOUGH THE CORN EARS MIGHT BE VARIABLE, IF THE STAND IS THERE THE YIELD IS GOING TO BE O.K. AGAIN, WE'RE GOING TO LOSE ON OUR TOP END, BUT GENERALLY SPEAKING WE'RE GOING TO BE O.K.

Noah: WELL THANKS MICHAEL I APPRECIATE IT. I'M AGWEEK REPORTER NOAH FISH IN MABEL, MINNESOTA ON THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN CROP TOUR.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV FROM BIG IRON,

Mikkel Pates: A FAMILY IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA IS BACK INTO IRRIGATION, THIS TIME TAKING WATER OUT OF THE FAMED MCCLUSKY CANAL.

Thank you to our twenty twenty one sponsors, Calcine, Aqua yield, Corteva Agriscience, K and T Irrigation, and AgCountry Farm Credit Services.

THE GARRISON DIVERSION WAS BUILT IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA MAINLY FOR FLOOD CONTROL AND WATER MANAGEMENT, BUT ITS LOFTY IRRIGATION GOALS WERE SLOWER IN COMING.

MIKKEL PATES TALKED TO A GROWER WHO IS CONSTRUCTING A NEW SYSTEM TO COMBAT THE CURRENT DROUGHT YEARS, AND MIKKEL, THE SYSTEM STILL HAS SOME CONSIDERABLE UPSIDE POTENTIAL, RIGHT?

WELL YES. IRRIGATION WAS ALWAYS PART OF THE PLAN FOR GARRISON, BUT POLICIES OVER WHICH CROPS COULD BE IRRIGATED -- AND THE WET YEARS IN THE 1990S AND 2000S -- SLOWED DEVELOPMENT UNTIL THE LAST FIFTEEN YEARS. OVERALL DEVELOPMENT IS AT A MUCH SMALLER SCALE THAN ORIGINALLY PLANNED.

Paul Anderson: WE JOKINGLY CALL THIS PROJECT 007.

PAUL ANDERSON ISN'T PART OF A TOP SECRET MISSION. BUT HE CALLS HIS IRRIGATION PROJECT DOUBLE-0 SEVEN. BECAUSE THAT'S HOW MANY HUNDREDTHS OF A MILE HE IS FROM THE HEADGATES OF THE MCCLUSKY CANAL.

Paul Anderson: APPROXIMATELY 35 FEET FROM THE CANAL.

THE CANAL IS PART OF THE GARRISON DIVERSION. ANDERSON STARTED IRRIGATING WITH WATER FROM IT AFTER THE EIGHTIES DROUGHT, THEN STOPPED IN 2014 DURING THE WET YEARS. BUT THE NEED IS BACK.

Paul Anderson: SEEING, YOU KNOW, THAT THE DRY YEARS ARE HERE FOR A WHILE, SEEING THE IMPERATIVENESS OF HAVING TO GET THE IRRIGATION GOING AGAIN.

ANDERSON FARMS AN AVERAGE-SIZED FARM FOR THE AREA. HE'S ANXIOUS TO GET ABOUT 600 ACRES OF IT BACK INTO IRRIGATION OVER THE NEXT YEAR OR SO.

Paul Anderson: THIS YEAR IT'S PROBABLY WORTH 120 BUSHELS TO THE ACRE ON AN AVERAGE YEAR IT MAY ONLY BETTER YOU BY 50 TO 70. ON A REALLY WET YEAR IT MAY NOT HAVE ANY BENEFIT. BUT IT TAKES THE VARIABILITY OUT OF IT.

PAUL'S DAD RICK HAS SERVED ON THE GARRISON DIVERSION BOARD SINCE 1986, HE STAYED OUT OF VOTE ON PAUL'S PROJECT APPROVAL, OF COURSE, BUT IS HAPPY HIS FAMILY WILL GET ACCESS TO THE CANAL WATER, WITH AN EYE TOWARD TAKING THE RISK OF DROUGHT OUT OF FARMING IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE.

Rick Anderson: WE'RE HOPING SO, BECAUSE IT'S AN INVESTMENT TO TRY TO MAKE THIS THING WORK.

Mikkel Pates: SO THEY'RE SEEING LIFE GIVING WATER, ADDING TO THE LIFE OF THEIR FAMILY FARM, FOR GENERATIONS TO COME. FOR AGWEEK, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES AT COLEHARBOUR, NORTH DAKOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE ON MIKKEL'S COVER STORY AT AGWEEK.COM OR IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE.

THE USDA HAS ACCEPTED OFFERS FOR MORE THAN 2.5 MILLION ACRES FOR ENROLLMENT IN THE YEAR'S GRASSLAND CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM SIGNUP.

THIS IS DOUBLE LAST YEAR'S ENROLLMENT AND BRINGS THE TOTAL ACRES ENROLLED ACROSS AL CRP SIGNUPS TO MORE THAN 5.3 MILLION ACRES, WHICH SURPASSES THE AGENCY’S 4 MILLION ACRE GOAL. FSA ADMINISTRATOR ZACH DUCHENEAUX ATTRIBUTES THIS TO CHANGES THEY MADE TO CRP PROGRAMS THIS SPRING.

Zach Ducheneaux: Offering producers a better suite of incentives including increased rental rates to participate in CRP programs.

FSA ACCEPTED 2,250 ACRES OF GRASSLANDS FOR CRP ENROLLMENT IN MINNESOTA, 404,000 IN SOUTH DAKOTA AND 22,700 IN NORTH DAKOTA.

DUCHENEAUX SAYS THE INTEREST IN WORKING LANDS CONSERVATION LEAVES ROOM FOR INNOVATION WITH OTHER PROGRAMS LIKE THE CONSERVATION RESERVE EASEMENT PROGRAM TO ENLIST NON-TRADITIONAL PARTNERS.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, HOW SOYBEAN GROWERS CAN HELP SLOW THE SPREAD OF A DEVASTATING PEST.

SOME RAINS FELL EARLY THIS WEEK IN THE REGION, BUT WILL THIS TREND CONTINUE AND SLOW THE HARVEST?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

SOYBEAN GROWERS ARE BEING URGED TO TEST FOR SOYBEAN CYST NEMATODE.

SCN IS THE MOST DESTRUCTIVE SOYBEAN PATHOGEN IN THE U.S., CAUSING YIELD LOSSES ESTIMATED AT A BILLION DOLLARS ACROSS THE COUNTRY. IT CAN BE EVEN HIGHER IN HOT, DRY YEARS.

SCN WAS FIRST FOUND IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF NORTH DAKOTA IN 2003, BUT IS EXPANDING WEST AND NORTH ACROSS THE STATE. IT CURRENTLY IS FOUND IN TWO DOZEN COUNTIES.

SO NDSU PLANT PATHOLOGIST SAM MARKELL SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT TO STAY AHEAD OF IT. HE SAYS SCN CAN BE IN FIELDS WITHOUT CAUSING OBVIOUS ABOVEGROUND SYMPTOMS, SO IT IS VERY HARD TO DETECT.

MANY GROWERS MAY NOT BE AWARE THEY HAVE IT FOR SEVERAL YEARS, UNTIL THEY START TO SEE SIGNIFICANT YIELD LOSS.

THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL HAS SUPPORTED AN SCN SAMPLING PROGRAM FOR GROWERS SINCE 2013.

Sam Markell: WE KNOW SOYBEAN CYST IS GOING TO BE A BIG ISSUE. I MEAN IOWA, ILLINOIS, THEY'VE PROVED THAT TO US. AND SO THEY'RE TRYING TO BE REALLY PROACTIVE AND GET OUT THERE AND GET GROWERS TO IDENTIFY IT AND THEN YOU CAN MANAGE IT. AND YOU'LL PREVENT THAT YIELD LOSS BY MANAGING IT.

GROWERS CAN PICK UP A SAMPLING BAG AT THEIR LOCAL EXTENSION OFFICE, AND SEND IT BACK IN FOR RESULTS. THE SOYBEAN COUNCIL COVERS THE COST OF LAB FEES.

BIG IRON CONTINUES TO BRING FARMERS IN THE REGION THE LATEST INFORMATION ON FARMING TRENDS, PLUS CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY TO HELP THEM ON THEIR FARM. WE TALKED TO SOME OF THE INDUSTRY LEADERS AT THE SHOW.

Brandon Muller: So what we're kind of known for at Total Ag is our custom built fertilizer systems. One of our new products this year that we are selling is called Calcine. Any farmer that has high salt levels in their fields, this is going to be their solution. It's going to take the calcium right out of the soil matrix and it's going to improve your soil health.

Michelle: Lange supply sells fertilizer injection knives and replacement kits for chisel plows, field cultivators, and dual-banding boots.

Andy Lange: The way our knife is designed, the upper body that bolts onto the shank, our leading edge of that is higher than the trailing edge and it forces soil back into the slot so it seals it up. We're sealing that anhydrous up before the dry is actually being placed.

Michelle: The Steffes Group has seen a hot land and equipment market this year and expects the trend to continue.

Scott: I don't see anything in the marketplace that's really going to change what's going on in the machinery world, especially the land events. There's just not a lot of land that's available and these prices are continuing to be strong.

Michelle: Bridgette Readel of Corteva AgriScience says she hasn't seen product shortages like this in her 25 year career.

Bridgette: There are an awful lot of supply shortages in the crop protection business this year. So I would make sure I'm talking to my supplier right now for my glyphosate, my gluphosinate, some of my phynoxy products, just to make sure I've secured supply.

Michelle: Advanced Grain Handling Systems specializes in dryers but also installs bins and other grain handling equipment.

Chad: The one thing here at Advanced Grain Handling Systems that we offer that no other companies offer is that we start at the design stages, all the way from ground zero, all the way to the finish. But we also include all the stages along the way--dirt work, and come right in to do the cement and build everything up, right down the electrical work on everything. So it's a one stop shop.

STILL AHEAD, PRECISION AG GETS A BIG BOOST AT SOUTH DAKOTA STATE.

THE 46-MILLION DOLLAR RAVEN PRECISION AGRICULTURE CENTER AT SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY WAS DEDICATED LAST SATURDAY.

SOUTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR KRISTI NOEM SAYS THE FACILITY ALLOWS COLLABORATION ON PRECISION AG TECHNOLOGY WITHIN SDSU AND WITH INDUSTRY.

Gov Kristi Noem: The partnership that we have going on in South Dakota between education, state government, and industry and the passion of these students is really going to pay off in the long run for each and every farmer out there that's looking for more efficiency and higher yields.

THE STATE OF THE ART CLASSROOMS AND LABS BENEFIT RESEARCHERS AND STUDENTS.

Rosalyn Madsen: The technology here is so much more advanced in the building that what we had previously and it kind of bridges the gap between industry and our school.

AG DEAN JOHN KILLEFER SAYS THE PRECISION AG STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO HELP AGRICULTURE TACKLE CHALLENGES SUCH AS FEEDING A GROWING POPULATION SUSTAINABLY.

John Killefer: With this precision ag major, the first in the nation. You know our students are coming out with this really unique blend of knowledge that's really going to allow them to be the leaders in this precision agriculture that is really the future of agriculture in our country.

THE FACILITY WAS SUPPORTED BY PRIVATE DONATIONS AND THE SOUTH DAKOTA LEGISLATURE.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.