Coming up on AgweekTV, we will talk about the EPA banning an insecticide that is important to the region and what that means for farmers. We will kick off our Agweek Corn and Soybean Tour in Minnesota. We will discuss Iowa farmland and rental values jumping higher following grain prices. Finally, we will meet with a North Dakota farmer wo invented the world's only grain bin and silo mover.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

EPA IS BANNING AN INSECTICIDE IMPORTANT TO THE REGION, WE'LL FIND OUT WHAT THAT MEANS FOR FARMERS.

THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR KICKS OFF IN MINNESOTA.

IOWA FARMLAND AND RENTAL VALUES JUMP HIGHER FOLLOWING GRAIN PRICES.

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AND WE MEET THE NORTH DAKOTA FARMER WHO INVENTED THE WORLD'S ONLY GRAIN BIN AND SILO MOVER.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HAS DEALT FARMERS IN THE REGION A TOUGH BLOW WITH THE ANNOUNCEMENT IT'S BANNING THE INSECTICIDE CHLORPYRIFOS IN FOOD AND FEED USES DUE TO SAFETY CONCERNS.

THE INSECTICIDE, AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE, IS BETTER KNOWN AS LORSBAN. IT TARGETS BITING AND SUCKING PESTS SUCH AS SPIDER MITES AND APHIDS AND IS USED IN CROPS LIKE CORN, WHEAT AND SOYBEANS.

FARMERS WILL NOW HAVE TO RELY ON OTHER INSECTICIDE CLASSES FOR CONTROL, SUCH AS NEONICOTINOIDS AND PYRETHROIDS.

Adam Varenhorst: We will be able to move to different insecticide classes so it won't be as if we don't have anything to use anymore. However, with some of our pests we are starting to see some resistances to some of those other insecticide products.

FARMERS ARE ALSO CONCERNED ABOUT THE HIGHER COST OF THOSE OPTIONS AND LESS EFFECTIVE CONTROL, THUS MORE POTENTIAL YIELD LOSS.

Kevin Deinert: We've seen in some research especially spider mite damage could result in either 40% to 60% loss on those affected acres.

THE BAN BECOMES EFFECTIVE SIX MONTHS AFTER ITS PUBLISHED IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER. REMAINING SUPPLIES CAN BE USED UNTIL THAT DEADLINE.

THE BAN DOES NOT AFFECT NON-FOOD USES SUCH AS MOSQUITO CONTROL, WHICH WILL BE UNDER REVIEW LATER IN 2022.

NEWSWIRE REPORTS SAY EPA IS EXPECTED TO RECOMMEND LOWERING THE 2021 BIOFUELS BLENDING MANDATES BELOW 2020 LEVELS TO ALIGN WITH COVID-REDUCED PRODUCTION. NO OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT HAS BEEN MADE YET, BUT IT WOULD BE ANOTHER BLOW TO THE INDUSTRY.

HOWEVER, THE REPORT ALSO INDICATES EPA COULD MAKE A SEPARATE RECOMMENDATION TO BOOST THE LEVELS FOR 2022 ABOVE THE PREVIOUS TWO YEARS.

MARATHON PETROLEUM CORPORATION AND ADM HAVE ANNOUNCED AN AGREEMENT TO FORM A JOINT VENTURE TO OWN AND OPERATE ADM'S PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED SOYBEAN PROCESSING FACILITY IN SPIRITWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA.

ADM WOULD OWN 75-PERCENT, MPC THE BALANCE.

THE FACILITY IS TO BE COMPLETED IN 2023 AND WOULD PROCESS 150,000 BUSHELS OF SOYBEANS A DAY INTO AROUND 600 MILLION POUNDS OF REFINED SOYBEAN OIL ANNUALLY. THAT FEEDSTOCK WOULD ACCOUNT FOR 75 MILLION GALLONS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY. THAT PRODUCTION WOULD GO TO MPC.

LAND VALUES AND CASH RENTAL RATES ARE ON THE RISE AND HITTING RECORD LEVELS IN SOME CORN BELT STATES.

FORMER IOWA STATE ECONOMIST MIKE DUFFY SAYS IOWA IS FOLLOWING THAT TREND WITH VALUES UP 8 TO 10-PERCENT. WHILE HE THINKS THE MARKET IS CLOSE TO A TOP, THERE HAVE BEEN A COMBINATION OF FACTORS DRIVING LAND PRICES THAT ARE STILL IN PLACE.

Dr. Mike Duffy: Crop prices, low interest rates, government payments were good, so income was up.

FARM MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST DENNIS REYMAN EXPECTS CASH RENTS WILL ALSO BE RENEGOTIATED HIGHER FOR NEXT SEASON, FOLLOWING FARM INCOME TRENDS.

Dennis Reyman: If we finish off well and the grain market holds up we'll see considerable raises in rent. Not just five or ten dollars an acre but more than that.

MANY RENTAL AGREEMENTS EXPIRE ON SEPTEMBER 1.

CORN AND SOYBEAN YIELDS WILL VARY WIDELY THIS SEASON DEPENDING ON MOISTURE, AND SOME AREAS RECEIVED SOME BADLY NEEDED RAIN THIS WEEK.

MIKKEL PATES KICKS OFF THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR WITH A CHECK IN CENTRAL MINNESOTA.

MIKKEL PATES HERE IN THE WILLMAR, MINNESOTA AREA FOR THE 2021 AGWEEK CROP TOUR FOR CORN AND SOYBEANS AND WE HAVE JASON FUSSY HERE WITH CENTROL OF MARSHALL, MINNESOTA, WHO HAS THE TERRITORY UP HERE CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE SIZE OF YOUR AREA?

YES, SURE. SO I MORE OR LESS COVER KANDIYOHI COUNTY WHICH WILLMAR IS CENTRALLY LOCATED IN KANDIYOHI COUNTY, BUT INTO CHIPPEWA AND SWIFT AND RENVILLE COUNTY A LITTLE BIT. KIND OF A RANGE OF ABOUT SIXTY MILES ACROSS BY SIXTY MILES NORTH AND SOUTH.

AND SO AS YOU LOOK AT THIS CROP, I MEAN, IT'S BEEN VERY VARIABLE AS I LOOK AT IT COMING ALONG. WHAT DOES IT RANGE FROM TO OUT THERE DO YOU THINK?

YOU KNOW, GOING AROUND THE COUNTRYSIDE RIGHT NOW, WHERE THERE'S GOOD AREAS OF THE COUNTY THAT HAVE HEAVIER DIRT, HAVE CAUGHT A COUPLE EXTRA RAINS, BUT OTHER AREAS, ESPECIALLY NORTH OF WILLMAR THAT ARE DRIER, WE'RE GOING TO SEE A RANGE OF FIELD AVERAGES OF CORN FROM 100 BUSHEL PROBABLY UP TO 230 BUSHEL, WHILE THE SOYBEANS COULD BE MORE IN THE NUMBERS OF 30 UP TO ABOUT 60.

WHAT ACCOUNTS FOR THAT VARIABILITY USUALLY? IS IT JUST WHO CAUGHT THE RAIN OR IS IT SOIL? OR WHAT DO YOU THINK?

IT IS A COMBINATION. NORTH OF WILLMAR IT'S A LOT LIGHTER, ROLLIER SOIL WHEREAS SOUTH OF TOWN IT IS HEAVIER SOIL. BUT THE SOUTHERN PART, THE SOUTHWEST PART ESPECIALLY CAUGHT SEVERAL INCH TO TWO INCH RAINFALLS THAT THE NORTHERN PART GOT TWO TENTHS, THREE TENTHS. AND THOSE MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE IT SEEMS LIKE, ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU TALK ABOUT THE LAY OF THE SOIL UP THERE AND THE WATER HOLDING CAPACITY.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, IT TAKES A "MIGHTY MOVER" TO MOVE THESE BIG FARM BUILDINGS.

AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR SPONSORS

AN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA FARMER HAD A VERY BIG IDEA ABOUT FORTY YEARS AGO, TO BUILD A 30 TON SILO MOVER.

WALTER GROTTE IS STILL MOVING SILOS AND GRAIN BINS, AND HIS INVENTION IS STILL THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

WALTER GROTTE LOVES A CHALLENGE. HE STARTED OUT IN THE 1960'S MOVING HAYSTACKS, THEN HE BUILT A MACHINE TO MOVE COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION GRAIN BINS AMONG FARMS, THINGS PICKED UP IN THE 1980S WHEN HE BUILT A MACHINE BIG ENOUGH TO MOVE THE ICONIC BLUE HARVESTORE SILOS FOR BROKE LIVESTOCK FARMERS.

Walter Grotte: SO I CALLED A.O. SMITH, THE PRESIDENT OF A.O. SMITH AND I SAID DOES ANYBODY MOVE THEM IN ONE PIECE? AND HE SAYS NO WAY DON'T EVEN TRY IT.

GROTTE TOOK THAT AS A CHALLENGE, AND BUILT HIS SILO MOVER. THEY DUBBED IT "THE MIGHTY MOVER".

Walter Grotte: I KNEW WHAT I WANTED AND HOW TO MAKE IT BECAUSE I WANTED IT STRONG AND I WANTED IT LOW AND I WANTED IT SO IT WOULD STEER THE BACK WHEELS. THE BACK WHEELS ON THIS WILL STEER AROUND THE CORNER.

IN FACT, THE MONEY FROM MOVING SILOS HELPED HIS OWN FARM SURVIVE THE 80'S AG CRISIS. NOWADAYS THEY'RE SHIFTED ALMOST ENTIRELY TO HOPPER BINS. .

Max Grotte: THERE'S REALLY NO END IN SIGHT FOR THIS, PEOPLE STILL KEEP CALLING.

WALTER IS 81 AND KEEPS GOING. HIS GRANDSON, MAX, 23, IS JOINING HIM IN THE BUSINESS, AND HE'S ALREADY THINKING OF WAYS TO IMPROVE THE PROCESS.

Max Grotte: I AM KIND OF THINKING ABOUT HOW WE'RE GOING TO BE ABLE TO MOVE THESE 40, 50, 60 THOUSAND BUSHEL FLAT BOTTOM BINS WHEN THE TIME COMES, WHEN THE FARMS GET SOLD THAT THEY WERE BUILT ON. AND MY IDEA IS ACTUALLY AN AIRBAG THAT YOU PUT IN THE CENTER OF IT TO KEEP IN ROUND.

THE GROTTES JUST KEEP GETTING BIGGER IDEAS, ABOUT BIGGER MOVES, IN FINLEY, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

NORTH DAKOTA'S RURAL COMMUNITIES OFFER LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES , AND THEY'RE ATTRACTING MORE PEOPLE WHO NOW CALL NORTH DAKOTA HOME.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN TALKS TO A FAMILY RETURNING TO THEIR RURAL ROOTS, TO HELP STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA.

Ross Lockhart: I GREW UP ON A FARM IN GRANDIN, NORTH DAKOTA, SO ONLY A FEW MILES FROM WHERE WE LIVE NOW.

LIFE HAS KIND OF COME FULL CIRCLE FOR ROSS AND AMBER LOCKHART. THEY GREW UP IN NORTH DAKOTA, MET AT COLLEGE IN MOORHEAD, THEN WENT TO GRADUATE SCHOOL IN THE U.K.. AFTER THAT THEY MOVED TO SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA TO START THEIR CAREERS. BUT THEY HAD A GROWING DESIRE TO MOVE BACK TO NORTH DAKOTA, WITH THEIR YOUNG DAUGHTER STELLA.

Ross Lockhart: IT WAS NICE, WE LOVED LIVING OUT THERE. IT JUST, SOMETHING WASN'T, SOMETHING WAS MISSING.

BUT ONE GOOD THING THAT CAME OUT OF THEIR TIME IN CALIFORNIA WAS A GROWING AWARENESS OF LOCALLY-GROWN FOOD. THEY YEARNED FOR A CLOSER CONNECTION TO THEIR FOOD, AND THE LAND.

Ross Lockhart: IT KIND OF GOT GOING IN THE BACK OF OUR MINDS THAT MAYBE WE COULD START FARMING OR START GROWING OUR OWN FOOD, AND THEN THERE'S THAT SORT OF LONGING FEELING WE HAD, OR I HAD ESPECIALLY, FOR NORTH DAKOTA TO BE BACK CLOSE TO THE LAND.

Amber Lockhart: AND TO HAVE A LITTLE SPACE. THE CITY WAS WONDERFUL IN MANY WAYS, BUT IT WAS CROWDED.

IT TOOK A FEW YEARS OF PLANNING, BUT TODAY HEART AND SOIL FARM IS THIRTEEN ACRES, WHERE THEY GROW CHEMICAL-FREE PRODUCE THAT THEY SELL AT FARMERS MARKETS AND TO LOCAL RESTAURANTS. AMBER CONSIDERS HERSELF THE FULL TIME FARMER, WHILE ROSS HAS A FULL-TIME JOB IN FARGO. THEY BOTH SAY AFTER SOME INITIAL SKEPTICISM FROM FRIENDS AND FAMILY, THEY FEEL WELL SUPPORTED IN THEIR VENTURE.

Amber Lockhart: WE TOOK A LOT OF TIME TO LEARN ABOUT WHAT IT WAS WE MIGHT BE DOING, AND TO PLAN BEFORE WE MADE THE JUMP. BUT THE PLAN WAS ALWAYS TO COME BACK AND GET A SMALL PIECE OF LAND AND GIVE IT A GO.

Jen Skoog: I DEFINITELY LEARNED A LOT FROM THEM! WHETHER THEY KNOW IT OR NOT.

JEN SKOOG RUNS "FAMILY ROOTS FARM" ON FIFTEEN ACRES NEAR CHRISTINE, NORTH DAKOTA. SHE SAYS THE LOCKHARTS HAVE BEEN GREAT MENTORS AS SHE STARTED SELLING HER PRODUCE. SHE SAYS PEOPLE LIKE THE LOCKHARTS HELP STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA.

Jen Skoog: NORTH DAKOTA HAS A LOT TO OFFER, WE'VE GOT WONDERFUL WIDE OPEN BEAUTIFUL SPACES. AND TO BE ABLE TO UTILIZE THAT, BRINGING MORE PEOPLE IN, WELCOMING PEOPLE IN, THAT DIVERSITY, THE DIFFERENT IDEAS, THE BACKGROUNDS, IS GOING TO DO NOTHING BUT HELP OUR STATE AND REALLY ALLOW US TO GROW IN ALL ASPECTS.

THE LOCKHARTS ARE HAPPY WITH THEIR RETURN TO NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE THEY FEEL GROUNDED ON THEIR FARM. NEAR GARDNER, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, HOW NANO-LIQID TECHNOLOGY CAN IMPROVE YOUR CROPS AND SAVE YOU MONEY.

THE WEATHER PATTERN IS FINALLY SHIFTING TO BRING SOME COOLER TEMPS AND SOME SHOWERS. WHO'S GETTING THE MOISTURE?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

EVERY DOLLAR COUNTS ON THE FARM, ESPECIALLY IN THIS YEAR'S DRY CONDITIONS. THERE'S A NEW TECHNOLOGY THAT USES NANO-PARTICLES FOR MORE EFFICIENT DELIVERY OF NUTRIENTS TO YOUR CROPS.

ROSE DUNN GIVES YOU A LOOK AT HOW NANOLIQUID TECHNOLOGY WORKS.

WITH SO MANY NEW, EXCITING TECHNOLOGIES BEING OFFERED. IT'S EASY FOR GROWERS TO FEEL OVERWHELMED. BUT AQUA-YIELD PRODUCTS ARE BRINGING NEW SOLUTIONS TO THE CRAZY WORLD OF CROP INPUTS. AQUA YIELD WAS FIRST INTRODUCED TO THIS REGION IN 2018 BY ERICKSON CUSTOM OPERATIONS. THEY WORK CLOSELY WITH TOM VANDER HEIDEN OF S.T. BIOLOGICALS ON TRIALS AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, AS NEW TECHNOLOGIES EMERGE. GROWERS ACROSS THE MIDWEST ARE ACHIEVING HIGHER YIELDS AND A BETTER CROP, WHILE REDUCING INPUT COSTS THROUGH NANOLIQUID TECHNOLOGY.

JIM KREBSBACH IS THE VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES FOR AQUA-YIELD. HE LOVES TO TELL GROWERS ABOUT THE GOOD RETURN ON INVESTMENT FROM AQUA YIELD.

Jim Krebsbach: WE'VE DONE OVER 650 TRIALS, AND WHEN WE COMBINE ALL THE DATA THAT WE GET OFF THESE TRIALS, IT'S A THREE TO ONE RETURN AVERAGE ACROSS THE BOARD. SO YOU CAN SAVE ON INPUTS AND YOU ALSO WILL GET AND CAN SEE A YIELD INCREASE. THAT'S PRODUCT THAT YOU GUYS PAID FOR, YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THAT. PUT IT INTO OUR TECHNOLOGY AND IT HELPS HOLD IT ON, KEEPS IT IN THE SOIL PROFILE LONGER, IT'S MORE AVAILABLE TO YOUR PLANTS.

AQUA YIELD IS UNIQUE IN THAT IT CAN BE DEPLOYED INTO MICRO AND MACRO NUTRIENTS AND OTHER CROP PROTECTION PRODUCTS A GROWER IS ALREADY USING AND PROTECTS THEM IN THE PATENTED NANO SHIELD. TINY NANO PARTICLES PENETRATE ROOT AND LEAF TISSUE, IMPROVING ABSORPTION INTO THE PLANT. THAT MEANS YOU CAN APPLY LESS NUTRIENTS AND CROP INPUTS

LET'S THINK OF NANO AS A DELIVERY VEHICLE, TO HELP GET MORE, WHETHER IT'S CROP PROTECTION OR FERTILITY INTO YOUR PLANTS. NO SPECIAL HANDLING, EASY TO USE. FOUR OUNCES PER ACRE, IT'S A REALLY LOW USE RATE. YOU CAN PUT IT IN FURROW, YOU CAN FOLIAR APPLY IT. ONE TWO AND A HALF GALLON JUG TREATS 80 ACRES, SO REALLY EASY TO IMPLEMENT INTO THE PROGRAM. AND I MEAN REALLY ALL FROM BETWEEN THREE DOLLARS TO POSSIBLY EIGHT DOLLARS ON A PER ACRE COST TO YOU TO TRY IT, SO VERY INEXPENSIVE.

IT DIDN'T TAKE LONG FOR ECO TO BUILD A NETWORK OF DEALERS AND GROWERS THAT BELIEVE IN THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY. CODY HATZENBUHLER, OWNER OF PAN AG AND DEALER OF AQUA-YIELD NANOLIQUIDS, PROMOTES THEM AS A KEY FUNCTION TO HELP WITH IMPROVING SOIL HEALTH AND REDUCING THE AMOUNT OF SALT BEING APPLIED IN-FURROW. THROUGHOUT THE SEASON HE PROMOTES PRODUCTS LIKE NANO PACK, TO IMPROVE MICRONUTRIENT BALANCE FOR THE PREVENTION OF DEFICIENCIES. AQUA YIELD'S NANOLIQUID TECHNOLOGY CAN REDUCE PLANT DISEASES BY MAKING FUNGICIDES MORE EFFECTIVE. THE COMPANY IS ALSO ROLLING OUT PRODUCTS FOR ORGANIC CROPPING SYSTEMS. THE USE OF NANO LIQUID TECHNOLOGY TRULY LETS YOU USE LESS AND YIELD MORE. IN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW AQUA YIELD WORKS, CONTACT JIM ERICKSON AT E.C.O. AT THE NUMBER OR EMAIL ON YOUR SCREEN.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, FARMERS IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA LEARN HOW COVER CROPS CAN IMPROVE THEIR SOIL.

MORE THAN TWO HUNDRED FARMERS FROM FIVE STATES GATHERED AT A SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA FARM RECENTLY, FOR A SOIL HEALTH FIELD DAY.

AS NOAH FISH REPORTS, THEY LEARNED ABOUT THE LATEST IN COVER CROPPING TECHNIQUES.

THE RYE WAS ABOUT THIS TALL ON ME, AND WE WENT IN AND PLANTED DIRECT INTO IT.

INTEREST IN SOIL HEALTH AND COVER CROPPING IS GROWING, IF THIS YEAR'S SOIL HEALTH FIELD DAY IS ANY INDICATION. THE WINONA COUNTY SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT PUTS ON THE ANNUAL EVENT, AND ORGANIZER LANCE KLESSIG SAYS IT WAS THE BIGGEST ONE YET.

Lance Klessig: COVER CROPS DO WORK, WE WANT TO USE DIFFERENT TOOLS TO MAKE THEM SUCCESSFUL. SO THAT'S ROLLER CRIMPING, OR THAT'S USING AIRPLANES OR DRONES, SO BEING WILLING TO THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX AND INNOVATING.

DAVE UNRUH AND HIS SON MIKE GROW ABOUT 800 ACRES OF ROW CROPS AND HAVE A FEW HEAD OF CATTLE. MIKE ALSO RUNS UNRUH COVER CROPPING. HE DEMONSTRATED HOW THEY'VE BEEN ROLLER CRIMPING RYE

WITH SOYBEAN COMING UP UNDERNEATH.

Mike Unruh: I THINK THERE'S A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT ARE CURIOUS ABOUT IT OR PEOPLE THAT HAVE JUST STARTED DOING IT AND WANT TO LEARN MORE.

THE UNRUH'S SAY THESE EVENTS ARE IMPORTANT, NOT ONLY TO LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS, BUT FROM OTHER FARMERS AS WELL.

Dave Unruh: I'M GUILTY OF WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE, YEAH, THAT LOOKS LIKE IT'S WORKING OVER THERE, MAYBE WE SHOULD TRY IT.

Lance Klessig: YES COVER CROPS WORK, WE JUST MIGHT NEED TO BE WILLING TO INNOVATE AND YOU KNOW, KEEP TRYING TO HONE IT IN AND MAKE IT SUCCESSFUL.

IN WINONA, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

THE EVENT ALSO DREW REPRESENTATIVES OF DIFFERENT SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS, SEED REPS AND IMPLEMENT DEALERS.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.