Coming up on AgweekTV we will visit Dakotafest, while taking a look at the hot button ag policy issues. We will hear how South Dakota is doing with its first industrial hemp crop. We see U.S. ag secretary Tom Vilsack tour drought-stricken Minnesota and talk about drought assistance. Finally, we will see the farmers that are being hit by the Minnesota based Pipeline Foods bankruptcy.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV WE'RE AT THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY DAKOTAFEST, WITH A LOOK AT THE HOT BUTTON AG POLICY ISSUES. I'm Jenny Schlecht at Dakotafest and we'll hear how South Dakota is doing with its first industrial hemp crop. AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK TOURS DROUGHT STRICKEN MINNESOTA AND TALKS DROUGHT ASSISTANCE. AND FARMERS ARE HIT BY THE MINNESOTA BASED PIPELINE FOODS BANKRUPTCY.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THIS WEEK WE'RE IN MITCHELL, SOUTH DAKOTA WHERE DAKOTAFEST IS CELEBRATING ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY.

THIS FARM SHOW HAS GROWN SUBSTANTIALLY DURING THAT TIME AND NOW BOASTS MORE THAN 400 EXHIBITS, WITH A NICE MIX OF BOTH CROP AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ON DISPLAY. PLUS CATTLE CHUTE DEMOS, PANEL SPEAKING EVENTS AND NETWORKING AMONG FARMERS AND INDUSTRY.

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SOUTH DAKOTA'S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION PROVIDED AN AG POLICY UPDATE AT THE DAKOTAFEST ROUND TABLES. DROUGHT ASSISTANCE, THE FIX TO THE CATTLE MARKETS, TAXES AND THE INFRASTRUCTURE BILL TOPPED THE LIST OF ISSUES AMONG LAWMAKERS AND PRODUCERS.

CONGRESSMAN DUSTY JOHNSON SAYS WHILE THE SENATE FINALLY PASSED AN INFRASTRUCTURE BILL, IT FACES A TOUGH ROAD IN THE HOUSE.

JOHNSON: I think it's pretty uncertain right now to be honest with you. There's a lot of concern both among the moderate democrats and the Republicans that at some point the speaker is going to tie together the 1.2 Trillion with the 3.5 trillion.

AND HE SAYS HE'LL OPPOSE ANY EFFORTS TO INCREASE TAXES TO PAY FOR THE BILLS.

JOHNSON: THAT'S THE PROBLEM, ONE OF THE MANY PROBLEMS OF THE 3.5 TRILLION IS THAT TO PAY FOR THAT THEY DO THEY GET RID OF STEPPED UP BASIS, THEY DO BRING THE ESTATE TAX DOWN. THAT STUFF, THAT DOG'S JUST NOT GOING TO HUNT.

DROUGHT IS ALSO TOP OF MIND WITH PRODUCERS, BUT SENATOR MIKE ROUNDS DOESN'T THINK CONGRESS WILL PASS ANY MAJOR DISASTER RELIEF.

Rounds: There will be minor modifications but there's money out there floating through the process right now. it's a matter of whether or not some of the money is diverted to the programs that actually count.

AND CATTLE PRODUCERS CONTINUE TO CALL FOR A MARKET FIX. SENATOR JOHN THUNE SAYS TWO HEARINGS HAVE SHOWN MORE COMPETITION IS NEEDED, YET, THERE IS NO QUICK OR EASY ANSWER.

Thune: Whether it's a solution that comes from Congress that legislates something like that, a 50-14 proposal or whether you can get justice through Packers and Stockyards. In the end I think it really is, there's going to have to be something done with the level of concentration there is in the meat packing industry.

THE GROUP ALSO DISCUSSED THE FUTURE OF THE RFS AND CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY.

ANOTHER PANEL DISCUSSION AT DAKOTAFEST FOCUSED ON HEMP, AS SOUTH DAKOTA IS IN ITS FIRST YEAR OF GROWING THE CROP. AGWEEK'S JENNY SCHLECHT MODERATED THE PANEL AND HAS MORE WITH 2 OF THE PARTICIPANTS.

Jenny: THANKS MICHELLE. I'M HERE WITH DERRICK DOHMANN AND KEN MEYER OF THE SOUTH DAKOTA INDUSTRIAL HEMP ASSOCIATION, AND DERRICK YOU WORK WITH A LOT OF GROWERS ACROSS THE REGION. WHAT DO YOU THINK IS IMPORTANT FOR THEM TO LEARN AS THEY'RE EMBARKING ON THIS NEW CROP?

Derrick: SURE. I GUESS THE NUMBER ONE THING THAT I'VE LEARNED OVER THE THREE YEARS OF BEING INVOLVED WITH THIS CROP AND GROWING IT IS I CAN'T STRESS ENOUGH EDUCATION. I REALLY ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO GET ON THE INTERNET, YOU KNOW REALLY FIGURE OUT WHAT THEY WANT TO DO WITH THIS CROP. IF THEY WANT TO PRODUCE IT, IF THEY WANT TO FIND A NICHE MARKET LIKE FOR INSTANCE ANIMAL BEDDING, SOMETHING LIKE THAT. I MEAN, THERE'S SO MANY DIFFERENT THINGS THAT PEOPLE CAN DO WITH IT. PROCESSING. SO NUMBER ONE THING, EDUCATE YOURSELF, FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU WANT TO DO AND ASK AROUND THE INDUSTRY. I MEAN, THERE'S PEOPLE THERE TO HELP AND ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS AND HELP YOU SUCCEED. THAT'S WHAT WE WANT.

Jenny: AND KEN, YOU WORK WITH FARMERS, OR YOU'RE GOING TO WORK WITH FARMERS FOR THE FIRST TIME THIS YEAR ON PROCESSING FOR CBD. WHAT DO THEY NEED TO KNOW BEFORE THEY APPROACH YOU?

Ken: WELL FARMERS ARE GOOD ABOUT ALWAYS DOING THEIR HOMEWORK, AND SO MOST OF THE FARMERS THAT HAVE CBD HEMP BIOMASS THAT THEY WOULD LIKE US TO PROCESS HAVE ALREADY BEEN TALKING TO US. THE GOOD THING OVERALL IS THAT IN SOUTH DAKOTA WE DO HAVE THE START OF A PROCESSING INDUSTRY, FOR ALL THREE SECTORS, FOR GRAIN, FIBER AND CBD OIL. SO IT'S A GREAT START.

Jenny: THANKS KEN AND DERRICK. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SD-HEMP.COM. At Dakotafest, this is Jenny Schlecht for Agweek.

THANKS, JENNY.

U.S. AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK AND SEVERAL OTHER STATE OFFICIALS PAID A VISIT TO SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA TO SEE HOW DROUGHT IS AFFECTING PRODUCERS IN THE STATE, AND TO OFFER WHAT HELP THEY CAN TO DO HELP. NOAH FISH HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Chip Callister: I'VE BEEN FEEDING HAY THAT WE NORMALLY STORE FOR WINTER. WE SHOULD BE KNEE HIGH IN THIRD CROP HAY RIGHT NOW.

CHIP CALLISTER RAISES CROPS AND CATTLE IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA. HE IRRIGATES HIS CROPS, BUT NOT HIS PASTURES. THAT COULD BE A PROBLEM COME WINTER.

Chip Callister: I'LL PROBABLY CHOP, YOU KNOW, SOME SILAGE AND THAT WILL HELP ME OUT A GREAT DEAL.

U.S. AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK CAME TO CALLISTER FARMS TO GET A LOOK AT THE DROUGHT CONDITIONS, HEAR ABOUT WHAT FARMERS NEED, AND TELL THEM WHAT HELP IS AVAILABLE TO PRODUCERS.

Tom Vilsack: THE FARMER CAN DO EVERYTHING HE OR SHE CAN DO, BUT IF MOTHER NATURE DOESN'T COOPERATE, THERE'S ONLY SO MUCH THE FARMER CAN DO. THAT'S WHY IT'S IMPORTANT FOR US TO HAVE THESE PROGRAMS.

VILSACK WAS JOINED BY MINNESOTA AG COMMISSIONER THOM PETERSEN, AND SENATORS AMY KLOBUCHAR AND TINA SMITH, ALL PLEDGING HELP.

Amy Klobuchar: MAKING SURE THAT ALL OF OUR RANCHERS AND FARMERS KNOW ABOUT WHAT'S OUT THERE FOR THEM RIGHT NOW, FROM THEIR FSA AGENTS AND FROM THEIR INSURANCE PEOPLE.

BUT PERHAPS MORE IMPORTANTLY, VILSACK SAYS, ARE LONG TERM SOLUTIONS TO CLIMATE CHANGE.

Tom Vilsack: MORE INTENSE STORMS, LONGER DROUGHTS, WILDFIRES. OUR SYSTEM ISN'T REALLY DESIGNED TO PROVIDE THE LEVEL OF HELP AND ASSISTANCE FOR THESE LONG TERM CHALLENGES THAT FARMERS AND RANCHERS AND PRODUCERS FACE.

AT CANNON FALLS, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

NORTH DAKOTA SENATOR JOHN HOEVEN HAS ALSO BEEN MEETING WITH PRODUCERS TO GET FEEDBACK ON EXISTING DROUGHT ASSISTANCE.

HOEVEN IS WORKING TO SECURE 6.28 BILLION DOLLARS IN DISASTER RELIEF IN THE SENATE AG APPROPRIATIONS BILL. THIS WOULD EXPAND THE WHIP PLUS PROGRAM TO INCLUDE 2020 AND 2021 DISASTERS. IT WOULD ALSO PROVIDE 750-MILLION DOLLARS FOR LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS. BUT SOME SAY THAT WON'T GO FAR WITH PASTURES DEPLETED AND HAY PRICES CLIMBING.

Brett Kenzy: You know that's like one month. A cow will eat that much money in a month and we're in August and they are already people feeding cows up there.

THE RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY IS ALSO PROVIDING FLEXIBILITY ON ADJUSTING CROPS THAT WON'T MAKE IT BY LEAVING A STRIP IF THEY ARE HAYED OR GRAZED FOR LIVESTOCK.

THE FUTURE OF ENERGY POLICY REMAINS UNCERTAIN, ESPECIALLY WITH THE PUSH FOR ELECTRIC CARS.

IN FACT IN MINNESOTA, GOVERNOR TIM WALZ IS PUSHING A CLEAN CAR STANDARD LIKE CALIFORNIA'S. BIOFUELS GROUPS SAY IT DOESN'T MAKE SENSE WITH THE SUCCESS OF BIOFUELS, INCLUDING THE STATES 20-PERCENT BIODIESEL MANDATE.

Bob Worth: We have proven ourself that it's a good renewable fuel and it works with what they want to get rid of carbon. Why aren't we using more of that? What aren't we going 50-percent? Why aren't we going to a B100?

HOWEVER, THE GOVERNOR'S PLAN INCLUDES OTHER ENERGY SOURCES.

Thom Petersen: The Governor has also been very supportive of renewable fuels is that has to be a piece of the mix.and so, that's why we had a major legislative initiative this year to help build out that infrastructure.

CLIFF KAEHLER WITH NOVEL ENERGY SOLUTIONS SAYS OTHER GREEN ALTERNATIVES MUST ALSO BE INCLUDED.

Cliff Kaehler: You know in 10 to 15 years it's going to be most all solar, wind and hydro with a few natural gas plants as peakers.

KAEHLER SAYS THE BIGGEST OBSTACLE IS BUILDING OUT THE GRID.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV FROM DAKOTAFEST.. SOME FARMERS ARE OUT MILLIONS OF DOLLARS AFTER A MINNESOTA GRAIN COMPANY SUDDENLY GOES BANKRUPT.

WELCOME BACK TO DAKOTAFEST. THERE ARE MORE THAN 430 VENDORS AT THIS YEAR'S SHOW. WE CAUGHT UP WITH A FEW OF THEM DURING THE THREE DAY EVENT.

REAVES BUILDINGS IS A LOCALLY OWNED, FAMILY OPERATED COMPANY THAT'S BEEN IN BUSINESS FOR 49 YEARS.

Suzannah Reaves: What sets us apart is really our engineered strength of our buildings. We're also a fully customizable building company. So you bring your plans to us, and because we manufacture all of our trusses, we can really provide you with the actual building package that you want and need, for your operation, your commercial buildings, your barndomineums. Anything you want, we'll build it.

MICHELLE: THE SOUTH DAKOTA ASSOCIATION OF COUNTY WEED AND PEST BOARDS TOLD US THE DROUGHT HAS MADE WEED CONTROL MORE DIFFICULT. BUT FALL APPLICATIONS ARE IMPORTANT.

Brenda Sievers: It's made weed control a challenge all the way across the board. Just because we haven't had any consistent rains where you could actually have and say, yes, this is a good fall to do some good control. A lot of those weeds, if they're not good and actively growing this fall, they're not going to take in any herbicide so it's really going to be a challenge. It's going to be very spotty.

MICHELLE: A HUGE JUMP IN STEEL PRICES AND INDUSTRY WIDE DELAYS IN ACQUIRING MATERIALS HASN'T SLOWED DOWN SUPERIOR GRAIN BINS.

Trever Meier: We really ramped for this year before things got crazy. You know, we were able to see that that market was going to go kind of nuts. There was so much uncertainty, we got in early. So we're still sitting good on bins. We can still get grain bins to farmers. You know, There are some pockets that are looking at some good crops. We can still get you a bin and get 'em up.

MICHELLE: AMERICAN NATIONAL INSURANCE HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE 1905 AND SPECIALIZES IN AG AND AG RELATED COVERAGE.

Shawn Ellingson: At American National, a couple things we do differently than our competition or other insurance other companies is, say you have your combine out on the farm and you run a rock or something into it and it tears it up. We'll replace all of that, there is no limit. Another thing we do is we have some endorsements on our policy where we can make that policy fit exactly for you. For example, if you go rent a piece of equipment, we have 250-thousand dollars of coverage automatically on your policy to cover that until you get a chance to give us a call.

DOZENS OF FARMERS IN AT LEAST THREE STATES ARE OWED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS FROM A BANKRUPT GRAIN COMPANY.

PIPELINE FOODS OF FRIDLEY, MINNESOTA, FILED BANKRUPTCY IN JULY, LEAVING MANY OF THEIR NON-GMO AND ORGANIC PRODUCERS WITH NO GRAIN, AND NO MONEY. MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE ON THIS COMPLEX CASE.

Brian Herbst: WHERE IS THAT MONEY AT TODAY? OK THAT'S A QUESTION THAT NEEDS TO BE ANSWERED IN MY MIND.

FARMER BRIAN HERBST SAYS HE WAS COMPLETELY BLINDSIDED BY THE BANKRUPTCY. PIPELINE OWES HIS FAMILY NEARLY 350 THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR NON-GMO GRAIN THEY WERE ACQUIRING, ESSENTIALLY WITH IOU'S, MONTHS AFTER EXECUTIVES KNEW THEY WERE IN FINANCIAL TROUBLE. HE'S INCENSED THAT THEY TAKING IN GRAIN THEY WOULDN'T PAY FOR, RIGHT UP TO THE END.

Brian Herbst: AND I CAN'T STRESS ENOUGH THE IMPACT, THE RIPPLE EFFECT THAT SOMEBODY IN THAT POSITION THAT JUST KEEPS GOING ON IN WHAT LOOK LIKE EXTREMELY NORMAL SITUATION TO THE FARMERS BUT YET WELL KNOWING THAT THEY'RE NOT GOING TO PAY FOR THAT LAST GRAIN THAT THEY'RE BRINGING IN BECAUSE OF THEIR FINANCIAL SITUATION.

CHRIS AND ANDREA KOLLER RAISED ORGANIC CORN AND SOYBEANS FOR PIPELINE ON A 183-ACRE FARM . THEY'RE OWED $82,000.

Chris Koller: WE JUST ASSUMED THEY WERE A STANDUP COMPANY, SO THIS COMPLETELY WAS A SURPRISE TO US.

THE FULL SCOPE OF THE CASE ISN'T CLEAR BUT PIPELINE HAS ASKED THE JUDGE IN DELAWARE TO ALLOW THEM TO LIQUIDATE NEARLY $30 MILLION IN GRAIN INVENTORIES, PRIMARILY TO PAY OFF SECURED CREDITORS -- NOT FARMERS WHO DELIVERED IT.

Andrea Koller: THE BILLS KEEP COMING IN AND WONDERING WHERE THE MONEY'S GOING TO COME FROM.

THE JUDGE ALLOWED ONLY MINNESOTANS IN THE CASE TO SELL STORED GRAIN TO OTHER BUYERS BEFORE IT SPOILS. ANDREA KOLLER SAID THAT'S A GODSEND. AND SHE WANTS TO MAKE SURE FARMERS ARE AWARE OF WHAT'S IN THE CONTRACTS THEY'RE SIGNING -- WHEN IT'S CASH, AND WHEN IT'S A CREDIT SALE.

Andrea Koller: WELL IT'S AFFECTED OUR FARM TREMENDOUSLY.

IN HOPE, MINNESOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

STILL AHEAD FROM DAKOTAFEST, WE'LL HAVE INFORMATION FOR CONTROLLING WEEDS AFTER YOUR SMALL GRAIN HARVEST.

WE'VE HAD A LITTLE SHIFT IN THE WEATHER PATTERN RECENTLY. WHAT WILL THAT MEAN FOR MOISTURE PROSPECTS IN THE REGION.

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

THE SMALL GRAIN HARVEST IS UNDERWAY IN THE REGION, BUT THE BATTLE AGAINST WEEDS IS FAR FROM OVER.

FARMERS SHOULD BE THINKING ABOUT THE CONSEQUENCES FOR NEXT YEAR'S SOYBEANS AND OTHER CROPS, IF THIS YEAR'S WEEDS GO UNCONTROLLED.

NDSU EXTENSION WEED SPECIALIST JOE IKELY SAYS WITH THE DRY CONDITIONS, HE'S BEEN SEEING A LOT OF GLYPHOSATE RESISTANT WATER HEMP AND KOCHIA.

HE SAYS THERE'S PLENTY OF TIME LEFT IN THE SEASON FOR THOSE WEEDS TO REGROW AFTER BEING CUT OFF, OR STILL GERMINATE AND PRODUCE SEED IF IT RAINS. IKLEY SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT TO TAKE ACTION NOW, TO SET UP FOR BETTER WEED CONTROL NEXT YEAR. ESPECIALLY KOCHIA, WHICH THRIVES IN DRY CONDITIONS. A SINGLE PLANT CAN PRODUCE 15-THOUSAND SEEDS IN JUST A FEW WEEKS.\u0009\u0009\u0009

AND THE FEWER WEED SEEDS GROWERS HAVE TO FACE NEXT YEAR, THE BETTER THE CHANCE OF SEASON-LONG WEED CONTROL.

Joe Ikely: SO WE HAVE A SITUATION WHERE WE HAVE ANOTHER THIRTY, MAYBE SIXTY DAYS UNTIL A FROST. AND SO WE HAVE THIS LONG PERIOD WHERE WE SHOULD THINK ABOUT CONTROLLING THESE WEEDS, TO SET US UP FOR BETTER WEED CONTROL NEXT YEAR, BECAUSE WE DON'T WANT TO HAVE THOSE WEEDS THAT SURVIVE GOING AND PRODUCE MORE SEED TO ADD INTO OUR SEED BANK.

9FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT WEED CONTROL AFTER SMALL GRAIN HARVEST, CONTACT YOUR LOCAL EXTENSION AGENT.

THE IOWA STATE FAIR WRAPPED UP THIS WEEKEND IN DES MOINES AFTER A HIATUS LAST YEAR DUE TO COVID.

THE FAIR FEATURED LIVESTOCK, CROPS AND HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITS FROM 4-H, FFA AND OPEN CLASS EXHIBITORS. ADD IN GREAT FOOD, THE FAMOUS BUTTER SCULPTURES AND EVEN THE STATE'S LARGEST PUMPKIN.

AG SECRETARY MIKE NAIG SAYS ITS A GREAT PLATFORM TO EDUCATE THE NEARLY 1 MILLION CONSUMERS IN ATTENDANCE ABOUT THE STATE'S NUMBER ONE INDUSTRY.

Mike Naig: We really bring together urban and rural. If you grew up on a farm or you didn't grow up on a farm you're here experiencing this together, there's a shared experience. And you know Iowa's State Fair is an agricultural fair and we work hard to ensure that it remains that way.

NAIG SHOWED IN THE 39TH GOVERNOR'S CHARITY STEER SHOW TO RAISE MONEY FOR THE RONALD MCDONALD HOUSES. THE WINNING STEER WAS OWNED BY LANE ELMQUIST OF AUDUBON.

STILL AHEAD, SOME IDEAS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR FRESH GARDEN PRODUCE.

THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR MANY OF US LOOK FORWARD TO PRODUCE FRESH FROM THE GARDEN.

CRISTEN CLARK, THE IOWA FARMER WHO WRITES THE "FOOD AND SWINE" BLOG, IS ALSO A MONTHLY AGWEEK MAGAZINE COLUMNIST, AND SHARES VIDEOS ON AGWEEK.COM. THIS WEEK, SHE SHOWS OFF HER FIRST GARDEN, AND SHARES A DELICIOUS RECIPE FOR FRESH CUCUMBERS AND TOMATOES. GO TO AGWEEK.COM TO CHECK IT OUT.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV HERE FROM DAKOTAFEST.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.